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529th Air Defense Group

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

529th Air Defense Group
Airdefensecommand-logo.jpg
83d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron North American F-86L-60-NA Sabre 53-0950.jpg
Active 1945-1946, 1946-1947, 1953–1955
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Type Fighter Interceptor
Role Air Defense
Part of Air Defense Command

The 529th Air Defense Group is a disbanded United States Air Force organization. Its last assignment was with the 25th Air Division at Paine Field, Washington. It was inactivated on 18 August 1955. The group was originally activated as a support unit for the 2d Bombardment Group at the end of World War II in Italy and then acted as a depot organization until inactivating in 1946.

The group was activated once again in 1953, when ADC established it as the headquarters for a dispersed fighter-interceptor squadron and the medical, maintenance, and administrative squadrons supporting it. It was replaced in 1955 when ADC transferred its mission, equipment, and personnel to the 326th Fighter Group in a project that replaced air defense groups commanding fighter squadrons with fighter groups with distinguished records during World War II.

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  • The 527th Convocation, University Ceremony – The University of Chicago (Webcast Feed)

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As marshal of the university, it is my honor to declare open the proceedings of the 527th convocation of the University of Chicago and to introduce the university's 13th President, Robert Jzimmer. Please be seated. >> PRES. ZIMMER: Good morning and welcome. As the marshal has just announced, today's ceremony is the 527th time the University of Chicago has assembled for a convocation. These convocations allow students to be recognized and celebrated for their achievements after completion of their studies and to do so through formal exercises. The primary purpose of convocation is of course to award degrees. But these occasions satisfy other objectives, as well. At convocation No. 1 on January 2nd, 1893, the university's first President, William Rainey Harper set out goals for these ceremonies, goals leading to practices that we continue to observe. Harper believed these occasions of high ceremony to be a necessary and nourishing part of the life of the university and intended to have them literally called together or caused to assemble all parts of the university community. In Harper's words "convocations are meant to bind together into a unity the many complex and diverging forms of activity which constitute our university's life and work." Today's ceremony, then, is also upon reflecting upon the whole of what we do in the many libraries, laboratories that make up our campus. And in addition it affords us all a moment to reflect upon the accomplishes of our past, and individually, collectively and institutionally. I confer the degrees awarded today by virtue of the authority delegated to me by the university's Board of Trustees, members of which are seated here on the platform. And I do so on behalf of the faculty of the University of Chicago that has responsibility for the educational programs recently completed. I again welcome you to the 527th convocation, a time‑honored ritual that recognizes achievements of which we can all be proud. [Applause.] Provost: As Provost of the University of Chicago, it is my privilege to introduce David Niremberg, dean of the division of the social sciences. Who will present today's convocation address. In addition to being an esteemed university leader Dean Nirenberg hold an academic appointment in the college and five academic appointments across the divisions of social sciences and humanities. He is a prolific interdisciplinary scholar whose work examines the ways in which Jewish, Christian and Islamic societies have interacted with and thought about each other. Dean Niremberg is the award‑winning author of five monographs on the history of ideas. Scholars have said about him who seems to know everything and whose research in writing have received similar praise. His books have been hailed as extraordinary. He is a significant international presence as a scholar. He has written extensively on diverse range of subjects including art, love, literature, politics and set theory. He is a regular contributor to such publications as the nation t, the new republic and the London review of books. His books have been translated into French, German, Hungarian. He serves on the editorial boards of several international journals. Dean Niremberg joined the University of Chicago faculty in 2006. He previously served on rice university and John Hopkins university. He earned his Bachelor's degree from Yale university and PhD from princeton university and was awarded an honorary degree by the University of cHICAGO in 2016. This year, David was elected to the American Academy of Arts and sciences. The title of his talk today is "a time of mind." David. [Applause.] >> DAVID NIRENBERG: SALVE, O ILLUSTRISSIMI! CREDO EGO VOS MIRARI, QUID SIT, QUOD, CUM TOT SUMMI ORATORES HOMINESQUE NOBILISSIMI SEDEANT, EGO POTISSIMUM SURREXERIM. OH, SORRY. I SEEM TO BE TALKING IN LATIN. I MUST HAVE BEEN CONFUSED BY THESE MEDIEVAL ROBES WE ARE ALL WEARING. AND WHY ARE WE SURROUNDED BY THESE GOTHIC BUILDINGS, WITH THEIR BUTTRESSES AND CRENELATIONS, ORGANIZED AROUND COURTYARDS AND CLOISTERS, ENTERED THROUGH POINTED ARCHES, IF THIS ISN’T THE MIDDLE AGES, OR HOGWARTS? I MEAN, THIS AS A SERIOUS QUESTION. AND SINCE I AM A MEDIEVAL HISTORIAN, YOU MIGHT EXPECT ME TO HOLD FORTH FOR THE NEXT 12 MINUTES ABOUT THE MEDIEVAL ROOTS OF THE MODERN UNIVERSITY. IT IS CERTAINLY TRUE THAT UNIVERSITIES HAVE A MEDIEVAL PAST, ALL THE WAY DOWN TO THEIR BASIC ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES. FOR EXAMPLE, THE COLLEGE AND HOUSE SYSTEM COMMON IN MANY UNIVERSITIES WAS ORIGINALLY FORMED BY STUDENTS WHO BANDED TOGETHER IN THE MIDDLE AGES TO DEFEND THEMSELVES AGAINST PROFESSORS, ARRANGE LODGING, FACILITATE STUDYING, ORGANIZE A KITCHEN AND ESTABLISH A JOINT WINE‑CELLAR.Alas, that last tradition only survives in Oxford and Cambridge. THE GREAT RITUALS OF UNIVERSITY LIFE ARE ALSO MEDIEVAL. WHEN THE UNDERGRADUATES AMONG YOU GATHERED IN ROCKEFELLER CHAPEL FOR THE ANNUAL AIMS OF EDUCATION LECTURE THAT WELCOMED YOU INTO THE UNIVERSITY, YOU WERE PARTICIPATING IN A MEDIEVAL TRADITION, ONE PRAISED IN 1699 BY THE PHILOSOPHER GIAMBATTISTA VICO, WHO GAVE HIS UNIVERSITY’S ORATION THAT YEAR, AS AMONG THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS INSTITUTIONS OF UNIVERSITY LIFE. THE RITUALS OF GRADUATION IN WHICH WE ARE PRESENTLY ENGAGED ARE SIMILARLY FULL OF MEDIEVAL ECHOES. THE TITLES THAT YOU ARE ABOUT TO RECEIVE ‑‑ BACHELOR, MASTER, DOCTOR ‑‑ ARE ALL MEDIEVAL, AS ARE THE HONORS, CUM LAUDE, ETC., CONFERRED WITH THEM AND THE TRADITIONAL PARCHMENT DIPLOMA FOR INSCRIBING THEM. EVEN THE ROBES WE ARE ALL WEARING ARE DERIVED FROM THE DRESS OF MEDIEVAL STUDENTS, AND NEARLY EVERY ASPECT OF THEIR DESIGN IS MEANT TO EVOKE SOME ANCIENT SYMBOLISMS. BUT NONE OF THIS TELLS US MUCH ABOUT WHY THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, LIKE OTHER GREAT NORTH AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES, LOOKS SO MEDIEVAL. OUR FOUNDERS WERE PERFECTLY AWARE THAT THEY WERE ESTABLISHING A MODERN INSTITUTION, DESPITE THEIR UNIQUE SYSTEM OF NUMBERING CONVOCATIONS. YOURS IS THE 527TH, WHICH MIGHT IMPLY TO THE UNINITIATED THAT WE WERE FOUNDED IN 1489. THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO WAS BUILT IN AND FOR THE MODERN AGE AND DEMANDED OF ITS STUDENTS AND FACULTIES THAT THEY DISCOVER THE FUTURE, CRESCAT SCIENTIA, WHICH THEY HAVE DONE; HENCE, MANY OF YOU ARE GRADUATING IN DISCIPLINES UNIMAGINABLE 125 YEARS AGO. INDEED, UNIVERSITIES IN GENERAL MAY WELL BE THE MOST FUTURE‑ORIENTED INSTITUTIONS OF THE MODERN WORLD, IN THE DOUBLE SENSE THAT THEY ARE DEVOTED TO LOOKING BEYOND THE HORIZON OF THE KNOWN, AND TO PREPARING THEIR STUDENTS FOR LIFETIMES TO COME. SO THE QUESTION REMAINS: WHY DOES AN INSTITUTION SO DEDICATED TO THE FUTURE CONSTRUCT ITS SPACE AND ITS RITUALS IN WAYS SO CONSCIOUSLY EVOCATIVE OF A DISTANT PAST? I BELIEVE THAT THE DELIBERATE ARCHITECTURAL AND RITUAL ANACHRONICITY OF OUR UNIVERSITY IS NOT MERELY THE PRODUCT OF HISTORY; IT IS ALSO ANAN INSTANTIATION OF ONE OF THE MOST VITAL TASKS OF A GREAT MODERN UNIVERSITY: TO CULTIVATE IN ITS STUDENTS AND FACULTIES A PARTICULAR TYPE OF SENSIBILITY TO TIME, WHICH I WILL CALL “A TIME OF MIND.” SINCE IT MAY NOT BE CLEAR WHAT I MEAN BY THIS, AND SINCE THIS CULTIVATION IS ONE OF THE UNIVERSITY’S MOST PRECIOUS GIFTS TO EACH OF YOU AND TO SOCIETY IN GENERAL, I’D LIKE TO SPEND A FEW OF OUR LAST MOMENTS TOGETHER MEDITATING UPON IT. THERE ARE SOME OBVIOUS WAYS IN WHICH THE TIME OF A GREAT UNIVERSITY IS DIFFERENT FROM OTHER TYPES OF TIME IN THE WORLD, FIRST AND FOREMOST IN THE EXTRAORDINARY FREEDOM IT GIVES ITS INHABITANTS TO SHAPE IT AS THEY WILL: WHEN TO SLEEP, WHEN TO STUDY, TO LOVE, OR PLAY; WHAT PROBLEMS TO WORK ON AND WITH WHAT DEGREE OF ATTENTION. DURING OUR YEARS IN UNIVERSITIES, WE HAVE A FREEDOM OF CHOICE IN THESE MATTERS THAT WE PROBABLY DID NOT HAVE BEFORE AND WILL NOT HAVE AGAIN. STUDENT POETRY FROM THE MIDDLE AGES MAKES CLEAR THAT THIS WAS ALSO TRUE IN THE MIDDLE AGES: “GO STUDY,” URGES REASON. I WOULD OBEY INDEED, BUT WHEN LOVE WHISPERS TREASON WHOSE BIDDING SHOULD I HEED? THAT POETRY, CALLED GOLIARDIC VERSE, ALSO MAKES CLEAR THAT THE FREEDOMS OF “UNIVERSITY TIME” CAN BE ABUSED: TO DIE INSIDE A DRINKING‑SHOP THAT IS MY TRUE VOCATION. TO PASS AWAY IN HOLY BLISS THROUGH HIGH INTOXICATION. AND ALL THE ANGELS WATCHING ME WOULD SHOUT TO GOD IN HEAVEN‑ LORD, HAVE MERCY ON HIS SOUL‑ HE’S DRUNK BEFORE ELEVEN! [Laughter] 12th Century! BUT WHATEVER ITS POTENTIAL FOR ABUSE, SOCIETIES, MEDIEVAL AND MODERN, HAVE DONE EVERYTHING IN THEIR POWER TO DEFEND THE FREEDOMS OF “UNIVERSITY TIME.” THAT DEFENSE HAS ALWAYS BEEN DEAR, WHICH MEANS, AMONG OTHER THINGS, EXPENSIVE. ONE MEDIEVAL FATHER PUT IT, “A STUDENT’S FIRST SONG IS ALWAYS FOR MONEY, AND THERE IS NO LETTER THAT DOESN’T END WITH A REQUEST FOR CASH.” WHETHER YOU ARE AN UNDERGRADUATE OR A GRADUATE STUDENT, YOUR PRESENCE HERE, AND YOUR EXEMPTION FROM THE DEMANDS OF EVERYDAY TIME IN THE ORDINARY WORLD, WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY ENORMOUS GENEROSITY ‑‑ GENEROSITY ON THE PART OF PARENTS, OF UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES AND OTHER PHILANTHROPISTS, AND OF A NATION WHOSE TAXES MAKE POSSIBLE PELL GRANTS, THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, AND MANY OTHER THINGS. IT IS THIS ECONOMY OF GENEROSITY THAT HAS PUT TIME FOR CONTEMPLATION, A TYPE OF TIME THAT THE ANCIENT ROMANS CALLED “OTIUM” AND ASSOCIATED EXCLUSIVELY WITH SENATORS AND OTHER ARISTOCRATS, WITHIN THE REACH OF SO MANY OF US TODAY, IF ONLY FOR THE YEARS WE ARE PRIVILEGED TO SPEND AT A GREAT UNIVERSITY. WHY IS THIS GIFT OF “OTIUM,” OF “UNIVERSITY TIME,” SO VALUABLE THAT WESTERN SOCIETIES HAVE CHOSEN TO DEDICATE SO MANY RESOURCES TO MAKING IT AVAILABLE TO YOU? MY COLLEAGUES IN ECONOMICS MIGHT ARGUE THAT YOUR YEARS AT UNIVERSITY CAN BEST BE UNDERSTOOD AS AN EXCELLENT INVESTMENT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CAPITAL, AND THEY ARE CERTAINLY THAT; BUT I WANT TO SUGGEST THAT THE FUTURE TIME VALUE OF YOUR LABOR IS NOT WHAT IS ESPECIALLY HUMAN ABOUT WHAT YOU HAVE ACQUIRED DURING YOUR YEARS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. THAT LIES, RATHER, IN AN ATTITUDE, AN AWARENESS, A “TIME OF MIND” HINTED AT ALREADY BY OUR ARCHITECTURAL SETTING; NAMELY, THE KNOWLEDGE THAT ALTHOUGH FOR US FINITE CREATURES THE PASSAGE OF TIME SEEMS TO BE THE MOST FAMILIAR AND IMPLACABLE GIVEN OF OUR BEING, WE CAN CHOOSE TO MAKE IT UNFAMILIAR, TO BEND IT, LIKE A GREAT PIANIST BENDS THE TEMPOS OF A BACH SARABANDE, IN WAYS THAT CREATE STARTLING NEW INSIGHTS. CREATING THIS “TIME OF MIND” IS ONE OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF EVERY GREAT UNIVERSITY, AND IN IT LIE THE POSSIBILITIES OF DISCOVERY. I MEAN, THIS IN AN OBVIOUS AND A LESS OBVIOUS WAY. THE OBVIOUS, DEDICATING YEARS TO REACH INSIGHTS ABOUT HAMURABI OR HAMLET, TO FIND A NEW ALGEBRAIC INVARIANT WITH WHICH TO CLASSIFY A TOPOLOGICAL SPACE, OR TO DISCOVER A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR GENE EDITING, HAS REQUIRED A CERTAIN DEGREE OF EXEMPTION FROM THE SHORT TERM TIME‑HORIZONS OF THE EVERYDAY WORLD. IT REQUIRED A DIFFERENT KIND OF ATTENTION, AS WELL, ONE CAPABLE OF SCREENING OUT MUCH OF THE CONSTANT CLAMOR OF THE COSMOS, OF STILLING THE ROILING AND RUMBLING OF BEING LONG ENOUGH TO ATTEND TO A QUESTION THAT LEADS BEYOND THE IMMEDIATE HORIZON OF THE PRESENT. IT REQUIRED YOU TO LEARN TO PLAY CHESS IN A WORLD OF TETRIS. I guess that dates me. YOU MAY BE LEAVING THIS UNIQUE ZONE OF EXEMPTION FROM SOME OF THE DEMANDS OF TIME, BUT YOU TAKE THE ABILITY TO CHOOSE YOUR “TIME OF MIND” WITH YOU INTO THE WORLD. AND THE LESS OBVIOUS, THE ABILITY WE CULTIVATE HERE TO CHOOSE THE TEMPORALITY OF OUR ATTENTION AND THE DIRECTION OF OUR THOUGHT, THE ABILITY TO STEP INTO A TIME OF MIND. THIS ABILITY IS THE PREREQUISITE FOR ALL TRUE DISCOVERY, IF BY DISCOVERY WE MEAN RENDERING THE FAMILIAR STRANGE. NIETZSCHE ONCE COMPLAINED THAT WHAT MOST OF THE WORLD WANTS WHEN IT ASKS FOR KNOWLEDGE IS “THAT SOMETHING STRANGE SHOULD BE REDUCED TO SOMETHING FAMILIAR.” HE CALLED THIS THE “ERROR OF ERRORS,” AND I AGREE. WHAT IS FAMILIAR IS WHAT WE ARE USED TO, AND WHAT WE ARE USED TO IS WHAT IS MOST DIFFICULT TO KNOW. THE GREATER DISCOVERY LIES IN BECOMING AWARE OF OUR MOST BASIC ASSUMPTIONS, SO THAT WE CAN QUESTION THEM AND MAKE THEM STRANGE. That was the point of a joke, not very funny, told by NOVELIST DAVID FOSTER WALLACE, ABOUT TWO YOUNG FISH WHO ARE SWIMMING ALONG. THEY MEET AN OLDER FISH WHO GREETS THEM WITH "MORNING, HOW'S THE WATER?" THE TWO YOUNG FISH SWIM ON FOR A BIT, AND THEN ONE OF THEM LOOKS AT THE OTHER AND SAYS, “WHAT THE HELL IS WATER?” HALF A CENTURY BEFORE, THE POET W.H. AUDEN MADE A SIMILAR POINT IN AN EQUALLY AQUEOUS BUT MUCH GRIMMER WAY: “A PERSON STRUGGLING TO SAVE HIMSELF FROM DROWNING BECOMES AN INTELLECTUAL, INSOFAR AS HE IS THINKING ABOUT THE CONDITIONS OF HIS EXISTENCE.” SO HERE IS THE GOOD NEWS: YOU DON’T HAVE TO ENCOUNTER A WISE FISH OR RISK A WATERY DEATH IN ORDER TO BECOME AN INTELLECTUAL, IF BY THIS WE MEAN LEARNING TO EXERCISE YOUR HUMAN CHOICE ABOUT WHAT TO THINK ABOUT, AND OUR ABILITY TO STEP OUT OF THE EVERYDAY FAMILIAR INTO A TIME OF MIND AND DISCOVERY. YOU CAN SIMPLY CHOOSE, AS EACH OF YOU HAVE DONE, TO SPEND TIME AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, WITH ITS MARVELOUSLY ANACHRONIC MIXTURE OF ARCHITECTURAL AND INTELLECTUAL TEMPORALITIES. IN A FEW MINUTES, PRESIDENT ZIMMER WILL ASK EACH OF YOU TO STAND, WILL FORMALLY CONFER UPON YOU YOUR DEGREE WITH ANOTHER ALLUSION TO THE DISTANT PAST ‑‑ “I WELCOME YOU INTO THIS ANCIENT AND VENERABLE COMPANY OF SCHOLARS” ‑‑ AND THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO WILL BECOME YOUR COMMON ALMA MATER, YOUR NOURISHING MOTHER. ALL OF US WHO REMAIN BEHIND HOPE THAT YOU WILL RETURN TO THIS MOTHER EARLY AND OFTEN. BUT WE HOPE EVEN MORE THAT WHEREVER YOU FIND YOURSELF IN THE YEARS TO COME, YOU WILL ALSO FIND THIS MOTHER AND HER PECULIAR TIME OF MIND WITHIN YOU, ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU TO STEP INTO, ALWAYS READY TO RENDER THE FAMILIAR STRANGE, AND PROVOKE YOU TO WONDER. AVE, ATQUE VALE. I SALUTE YOU, AND FAREWELL. [Applause.] [Music.] Come, come, ye sons of art, come fly away. Come, come, ye sons of art, come, come away. All your voices. So celebrate, so celebrate this triumphant day. Jubilant voices and excellent sway. So celebrate, celebrate this triumphant day. The tuneful role, the rail, the vail, with charm and he who might. The heart the seasoned to invite. Rejoicing. Shouting. With innocent within us rails. The shout. With innocent, with innocent fellows to welcome us there. [Applause.] At this time in the favoring presence of the congregation here assembled tsponsors of the honorary degree candidates will present the candidates for honorary degrees to the President of the university. Andrew M. Alper's with the University of Chicago many years of service and philanthropic service. Exemplified by his leadership of the Board of Trustees from 2009‑2015. An active alumnus since his graduation from the college and business school, he was elected a member of the university's Board of Trustees in 1999. He served for six years as Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees before being elected chair in 2009. During his time as chair, he helped the university select successfully launch the public phase of its 4.5 billion dollars comprehensive campaign, the University of campaign: Inquiry and impact. He and his family have supported many divisions of the university, including the college, the law school, the biological sciences division and Chicago Booth. He started his career on Wall Street at Goldman Sachs where he spent 21 years as an investment banker, cohead of the financial institutions group, and chief operator of the investment banking division. In early 2002, mayor Michael R. Bloomberg appointed him President of the New York City economic development corporation and chairman of the New York City industrial development agency. In his four years and one half years of New York City service, he was responsible for developing strategies for bringing jobs and economic growth back to the city in the aftermath of the events of September 11, 2001. He continues to serve the university as a member of the Board of Trustees, member of the University of Chicago medical center Board of Trustees, and is a life member of the Chicago Booth council. >> PRES. ZIMMER: Andrew M. Alper has been an enthusiastic and general supporter of the University of Chicago for over four decades and a tireless advocate on its behalf. Through his distinguished leadership of the Board of Trustees and his generous philanthropy, he has served the university with distinction. By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of laws. I now present you with the diploma and hood of the university and welcome you to the ancient and honorable company of scholars of the University of Chicago. Congratulations. [Applause.] Jeffrey Hubbell: Francis H. Arnold is in the field of electrical engineering and biological systems, most complex by oh molecules to create new molecular functions. She has developed a number of fundamental insights and approaches that has been translated to applications and that have societal impact in green chemistry and biofuels. Through an extensive program of scientific undertaking, she has developed the field of directed evolution in which molecular methods, biomolecular methods are employed to put selective pressure on a BIOCULE to iteratively move it the from its starting function to an entirely new function. She therefore pioneered an entirely new approach for biomolecular discovery. Through continued scientific and technological innovations as well as demonstrations with a number of compelling examples, the concept of directed evolution has become mainstream, being adopted widely by academia and industry alike. >> PRES. ZIMMER: Frances H. Arnold has pioneered research and translation in biomolecular engineering through her development of the concept of directed evolution. Her fundamental discoveries have led to a new field of scientific investigation with applications to green chemistry and the development of biofuels contributing to a more sustainable future. By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I hereby confer upon you the degree of doctor of science. I now present you with the diploma and hood of the university and welcome you to the ancient and honorable company of scholars of the University of Chicago. Congratulations. [Applause.] Gary Tubb: J. Patrick Olivelle, is an outstanding critic of literature and south Asian religions. His work has defined the field of endology as it is currently understood and has transformed the scholarly world of fundamental concepts in India. It has also helped reorient contemporary perceptions of India's past. Much of his work has been devoted to fundamental philological tasks of critical editing and scholarly translation. His entire career has been devoted to an extraordinarily ambitious decades‑long project. He has, over the course of the last 40 years, produced a major synthesis of the overlapping and often contending religious and learned cultures of classical Indian civilization. Much of his work has concentrated on one particular and especially significant area of this wider field, what might be termed classical brahmannism. This ‑‑ aesthetic renunciation in his earliest work and culminating in his image east tierial edition and publication. And in legal reasoning and in Hindu law and governance especially in his 2005 edition of the laws of Manu and his translation and studies of the arty Shahs ther. >> PRES. ZIMMER: J. Patrick Olivell's contributions to Sanskrit and polyliterature amount to the most sustained, modern scholarly reflection on the notion of Darma, that central most polysemmic and linchpin of classical Indian civilization. His enormous accomplishments spanning the domains of philosophy, theology, literature and history. By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I hereby confer upon you the degree of doctor of humane lettersy now present you with the diploma and hood of the university and welcome you to the ancient and honorable company of scholars of the University of Chicago. Congratulations. [Applause.] Gregory Engel: The William benton medal is given to those in the field of education. This field includes not only teachers but also anyone who contributes in a systematic way to shaping minds and disseminating knowledge. The University of Chicago is honored to welcome this year's medal winner, who was chosen by the faculty and will now be introduced by Gregory Engel, professor, Department of Chemistry, the James Franke Institute, the institute of physical dynamics and the college. James G. Anderson is the leading experimental measurement of catalytic ‑‑ in atmosphere. He has led a research program the chemical, global impacts of catalytic ozone loss in the upper atmosphere. His work ties microscopic molecular mechanisms and laboratory kinetics of radical molecule reactions to controlled, ultra sensitive, in sit you atmospheric measurements of radicals in the atmosphere. He has also conducted the first air borne measurement of hydroxyl radicals in the stratosphere followed soon there after by halogen molecules injected into the atmosphere from the breakdown of chlorofluorocarbons. Combining these suites of instruments, he conducted the pivotal be experiments that conclusively demonstrated that chlorine ‑‑ ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere now known as the ozone hole. His work relating to the ozone hole directly led to the development of the Montreal protocol, an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer by phasing out the production of substances responsible for its depletion. More recently, his research has linked ozone chemistry to climate change, a finding that explains the microscopic origin of the thinning of the ozone layer over the most populated portions of the planet. >> PRES. ZIMMER: Throughout his career, James G. Anderson has championed environmental stewardship by creating impeccable datasets that prove how human activities affect change in our planet's atmosphere. He has provided leadership to the global community by pioneering traceable scientific measurements that demonstrate specific and throw progenic effects on climate and ozone. It is my honor to present the University of benton medal to James G. Anderson. Congratulations. [Applause.] The Rosenberger medal was established by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse L. Rosenberger in 1917 to recognize the achievement through research in authorship and invention for discovery for unusual public service or for anything deemed to be of great benefit to humanity. The University of Chicago is honored to welcome this year's medal winner, who was chosen by the faculty and will now be introduced by Jessica stockholder. Raymond W. and Martha hill petter Gruner Department of Visual arts and the college, chair, Department of Visual arts. Jessica stockholder: In the wide and advancement of his paintings, he has celebrated African‑American culture, to the artistic canonand understanding how that is understood. He is well known for subjects that focus on black subjects historically from the canon. From abstraction, to comics. He paints figures and signs. His paintings are intimate and also meta as they include the museums and galleries that they are shown inals part of their subject. He is an inspired, imaginative and hard working chronicler of the African‑American experience, primarily a painter he also uses sculpture, collage and video photography to insist on black identity both in the United States and in western art. His mission is to populate museums and galleries with representations of people of color. He has said, quote, "it is possible to transcend what is perceived to be the limitations of a race‑conscious kind of work. It's a limitation only if you accept someone else's foreclosure from the outside. If you plumb the departments yourself, you can exercise a good deal of creative flexibility. You are limited on by your ability to imagine possibilities. >> PRES. ZIMMER: One of the leading contemporary painters of his generation and a mainstay of the international and Chicago art world for over 30 years, Kerry James marshall, vibrant complex and multilayered images of African‑American history and culture synthesize different traditions and genres and represent a body of work that is deeply rooted in personal biography and historical detail while challenging stereotypic representations of African‑Americans. It is my honor to present the University of Chicago Rosenberger medal to kerry James marshall. Congratulations. [Applause.] >> >>: Eric Isaacs: Each year members of the university's distinguished faculty are honored for their exemplary skills and service as teachers. This morning, I should like to acknowledge them by name and ask those who are here on the platform to stand to be recognized by the university community and our guests. For the Quantrell Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching, Daniel Scott McGee, associate professor, Department of Anesthesia and critical care in the college. [Applause.] Emily Lynn Osborne, associate professor, Department of History and the college. [Applause.] Derek Allen Neal, professor, Department of Economics and the college. [Applause.] Maltavilleer, assistant professor, Department of Philosophy and the college. [Applause.] And Sarah N. Zeistler senior lecturer, Department of Mathematics and the college. [Applause.] For the faculty Award for Excellence in graduate teaching and mentoring, Charles Kohn, Mary L. block professor, Department of Art history and the college. [Applause.] Nicholas Hotsopolis, Department of Organizism biology, Department of Neurology and the college. [Applause.] Heinrich M. Yaeger, William J. Fred man and Alicia town send Friedman, the James Franc institute and the college. [Applause.] Heather keenlyside, assistant professor, Department of English language and literature and the college.  [Applause.] Linda Zurillia, Charles E. Miriam, service professor, Department of Political science and the college. [Applause.] And for the McClean faculty award which is conferred by the alumni association, Michael Murin, the Raymond W. and Martha hill petter grouper emeritus in the humanities and professor of religion and literature in the divinity school. [Applause.] (Motet choir singing) The deans of several faculties will now present the candidates for academic degrees to the President of the university. As the candidates stand, we invite you to recognize their achievements with applause. The dean of the division of the biological sciences and of the Pritzker School of Medicine will now present candidates for the degrees of Dr. Of medicine, master of science and Dr. Of philosophy in programs in the division of the biological sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine. Candidates for the degree of Dr. Of medicine will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have fulfilled all the requirements of the Pritzker School of Medicine and the division of the biological sciences. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of medicine. [Applause.] >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of medicine and I express the hope that your work will promote the health and well‑being of all people. Congratulations. [Applause.] Candidates for the degree of master of science for programs in the division of biological sciences in the Pritzker School of Medicine will please stand and be recognized. (helicopter flying overhead). Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the division of the biological sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine and the special programs approved by their departments. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of science. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in the biological sciences. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of science and I express the hope that your learning will lead you to advanced knowledge in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. Congratulations. [Applause.] Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy of programs in the biological sciences will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, each of these students I now present has attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation that contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the biological sciences, I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] The dean of the division of the humanities will now present candidates for the degree of masters of arts, master of fine arts, and doctor of philosophy in programs in the division of the humanities. Dean: Candidates for the degree of master of arts in programs in the division of the humanities will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the division of the humanities and the special programs approved by their departments. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of arts. [Applause.] >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in the humanities. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of arts and I express the hope that your learning will lead you to advanced knowledge in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. Congratulations. [Applause.] Dean: Candidates for the degree of master of fine arts in programs in the division of the humanities please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the division of the humanities and the special programs approved by the Department of Visual arts. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of fine arts. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in the humanities. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of fine arts and I express the hope that your work will enrich our shared cultural landscape. Congratulations. [Applause.] Dean: Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy in programs in the division of the humanities will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, each of the students I now present has attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation that contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the division of the humanities, I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] The dean of the division of the physical sciences will now present candidates for the degree of master of science and doctor of philosophy in programs in the division of the physical sciences. Dean Kolb: Candidates for the degree of master of science in programs in the division of the physical sciences will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the division of the physical sciences and the special programs approved by their departments. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of science. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in the physical sciences. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of science and I express the hope that your learning will lead you to advanced knowledge in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. Congratulations. [Applause.] Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy in programs in the division of the physical sciences will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, each of the students I now present has attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation which contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the division of the physical sciences, I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] The dean of the division of the social sciences will now present candidates for the degrees of master of arts and doctor of philosophy in programs in the division of social sciences as well as a candidate for the degree of doctor of philosophy jointly with the University of Chicago Booth School of business. Dean: Candidates for the degree of master of arts in programs in the division of the social sciences will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the division of social sciences and the special programs approved by their departments. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of arts. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in the social sciences. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of arts and I express the hope that your learning will lead you to advanced knowledge in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. Congratulations. [Applause.] Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy in programs in the division of the social sciences and "the" candidate for the degree of doctor of philosophy awarded jointly with the University of Chicago Booth School of business will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, each of the students I now present has attained a scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation which contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the division of the social science, I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] The dean of the University of Chicago Booth School of business will now present candidates for the degrees of international master of business administration, master of business administration, and doctor of philosophy in programs in the University of Chicago Booth School of business as well as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy jointly with the division of social sciences. >> DEAN: The candidate for the degree of international master of business administration will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, this student has completed the program of international business studies prescribed by the faculty of the University of Chicago Booth School of business. I now have the honor to present her as a candidate for the degree of international master of business administration. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of international master of business administration and I express the hope that your work will further global understanding and the responsible development of international business for the benefit of all people. Congratulations. [Applause.] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of business administration will please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, these students have completed the program of professional studies prescribed by the faculty of the University of Chicago Booth School of business. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of business administration. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of business administration and I express the hope that your work will further wise choices in the allocation of economic resources for the benefit of all people. Congratulations. [Applause.] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy in programs in the University of Chicago Booth School of business will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, the students I now present have attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and have prepared a dissertation that contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the University of Chicago Booth School of business, I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] Eric Isaacs: The dean of the divinity school will present master of divinity, master of arts and doctor of philosophy in programs in the divinity school. >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of divinity will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, each of the students I now present is academically qualified to engage in the profession of ministry, having completed a course of study prescribed by the faculty of the divinity school. I have the honor to point them as candidates for the degree of master of divinity. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of divinity and I express the hope that your work will contribute to a learned and effective ministry dedicated to the spiritual Welfare of humankind. Congratulations. [Applause.] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of arts for programs in the divinity school will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, the students I now present have completed a program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the divinity school for foundational education in the academic study of religion. I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of arts. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in divinity. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of arts and I express the hope that your learning will lead you to advanced knowledge in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. Congratulations. [Applause.] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy in programs in the divinity school will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, each of the students I now present has attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation which contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research in the academic study of religion. On behalf of the faculty in the divinity school, I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] Eric Isaacs: The dean of the degrees will deliver the master of liberal arts, master of science and master of arts and teaching in programs in the Graham School. >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of liberal arts in programs in the Graham School of continuing liberal and professional studies will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the Graham School of continuing liberal and professional studies and I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of liberal arts. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of study in liberal arts. And by the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of liberal arts and I express the hope that your learning will lead you to advanced knowledge in or enrich the practice of your chosen fields. Congratulations. >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of science in the Graham School of continuing liberal and professional studies will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the Graham School of continuing liberal and professional studies. And I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of science. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in your profession. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of science and I express the hope that your learning will lead you to advanced knowledge in or enrich the practice of your chosen field. Congratulations. >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of arts of teaching in the Graham School of liberal and professional studies will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the Graham School of continuing liberal and professional studies. And I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of arts in teaching. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of arts in teaching and I express the hope that your work will contribute to the education of children and the creation of the society dedicated to learning. Congratulations. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Eric eyes: The dean will present the degrees of master of arts, master of public policy and doctor of philosophy in programs in the Harris school as well as candidates for the degree of master of science jointly with the division of physical sciences. >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of masters of arts in programs in the Harris school and candidates for the degree of master of science awarded jointly with the division of the physical sciences will please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, the students I now present have completed the course of professional studies prescribed by the faculty of the Irving B. Harris graduate School of public policy studies and the division of the physical sciences. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of arts or master of science. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of arts or master of science, and I express the hope that your work will improve our understanding of public policy. Congratulations. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of public policy in the programs in the Harris school will please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, these students have completed the course of professional study prescribed by the faculty of the Irving B. Harris graduate School of public policy studies. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of public policy. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of public policy, and I express the hope that your work will guide public policy toward the enhancement of the common good. Congratulations. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy in programs in the Harris school will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, each of the students I now present has attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation which contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the Irving B. Harris graduate School of public policy, I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] Eric Isaacs: The dean of the faculty of the molecular engineering will now present the degrees for molecular ENGINEERING, doctor Of philosophy in molecular engineering. CANDIDATES will please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, this student I now present has attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation which contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the institute for molecular engineering, I have the honor to present him as a candidate for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] Eric Isaacs: The dean of the law school will flu present candidates for the degree of doctor of laws, master of laws, master of legal studies and doctor of jurisprudence in programs in the law school. >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of doctor of law will please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have fulfilled all of the requirements prescribed by the faculty of the law school to qualify them for the profession of law. I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of law. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of law and I express the hope that your work will contribute to the protection of liberty and the advancement of justice. Congratulations. [Applause.] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of laws will please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, these students have fulfilled all of the requirements prescribed by the faculty of the law school to qualify them as masters of laws. I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of masters of law. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of laws and express the hope that your work will further the growth of knowledge in the field of law. Congratulations. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree doctor of jurisprudence please stand and be recognized. Mr. President, these students have completed, with distinction, a program of advanced study prescribed by the faculty of the law school and have submitted dissertations which are original contributions to legal knowledge. I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree doctor of jurisprudence. >> PRES. ZIMMER: You have successfully completed a program of advanced study in the law. And by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of jurisprudence and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] Eric Isaacs: The dean of the School of social service administration will now present candidates for the degrees of master of arts and doctor of philosophy in programs in the School of social service administration. >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of master of arts in programs in the School of social service administration will please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, these students have completed the program of studies prescribed by the faculty of the School of social service administration. I now have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of master of arts. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of master of arts and I express the hope that your work will promote the Welfare of individuals and the achievement of a socially just society. Congratulations. [Applause.] >> DEAN: Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy in programs in the School of social service administration will please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, each of the students I now present has attained scholarly distinction in advanced studies and has prepared a dissertation which contributes to knowledge in a particular field of research. On behalf of the faculty of the School of social service administration, I have the honor to present them as candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy. >> PRES. ZIMMER: By virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of doctor of philosophy and welcome you to this ancient and honorable company of scholars. Congratulations. [Applause.] Eric Isaacs: The dean of the college will now present candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in programs in the college. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] >> DEAN: Will the members of Class of 2016 who are candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science please stand and be recognized. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Mr. President, these students have completed the prescribed program of undergraduate studies. On behalf of the faculty of the college, I now have the honor to present them for candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. >> PRES. ZIMMER: University college Class of 2016 ‑‑ [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] [Laughter] ‑‑ by virtue of the authority delegated to me, I confer upon you the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and welcome you to the fellowship of educated individuals. Congratulations. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Please rise for the singing of the university's alma mater. [Music.] Today we gladly sing the praise of her whose daughters and whose sons now loyal voices proudly raise to bless her with our beinisons. All of fair mothers, fairest she. Most wise of all that wisest be. Most true of all the true say we is our dear alma mater. Please be seated. >> PRES. ZIMMER: This is a special day for all of you upon whom I have just conferred a degree and it is a special day for the family members and friends who may be here to join you. It marks the completion of your study or at least one phase of that study, a path that I trust has been challenging. And I hope that you are enjoying the moment of celebration and perhaps moment of reflection that this convocation affords. You are now all graduates of the University of Chicago. [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] Because of your achievements that we celebrate here today with your family and friends, each of you will always be connected to the University of Chicago, a connection that I hope that you and we will foster for many years. The University of Chicago is an institution driven from its inception by an idea, an idea that one could create and continuously renew a university focused on rigorous, intense inquiry and analysis. The university, through its work every day, expresses the view that clarity derives from the clash of ideas, the challenge of assumptions and the willingness to accept answers only when they meet the tests of argument. We seek understanding that is complex, expandable and fluid rather than simple and rigid, an understanding that reflects analysis rather than ideology, that accepts complexity over the comfort of simplicity, that seeks to delineate both the power and the limitations of argument, and an understanding always ready to incorporate new data which can emerge and which in fact must be sought. We believe that the best education, the most empowering education and the most powerful learning take place in the environment of constant challenge that is implicit in this culture of rigorous inquiry than this culture is responsible for producing ideas of power and importance to humankind. This focus on rigorous inquire has defined the University of Chicago and its research and education at all levels since its beginning and continues to do so today. The university and its culture are renewed every day by the work of its faculty, students and staff. And while it is natural to focus on your own achievements today and what they mean for your future, you can also take satisfaction in your contribution to the ongoing renewal of your university, the University of Chicago. I know that as graduates of this university in the coming years, you will be called upon to act, to speak and to lead. And like so many University of Chicago graduates who have come before you, you will approach this challenge of leadership empowered by your University of Chicago education, the power of analysis and ideas that you have experienced here and that are now your own will serve you wherever your path takes you and whatever challenges you confront. Each of you who received the degree today has received help and support. From parents, family, spouses, partners, children, friends, mentors or university faculty and staff. And while it is your achievement that we mark today, all of these supporters can rightly take great pride in your accomplishments. And so to all degree recipients, please accept my congratulations for all that you have achieved. I wish you all good fortune and happiness in the years ahead. Enjoy your coming adventures wherever they may lead you. Congratulations. [Applause.] [Music.] [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] >> DEAN MARSH: Declaring the ceremonies the ceremonies and divisions and schools will take place in the schedule on your program. We ask that you remain in place until the platform party has withdrawn. This now concludes the 527th convocation of the University of Chicago. Let knowledge grow from more to more and so be human life enriched. [Music.]

Contents

History

World War II

The group was activated at Amendola Airfield, Italy as the 529th Air Service Group shortly after V-E Day[1][2] as part of a reorganization of Army Air Forces (AAF) support groups in which the AAF replaced Service Groups that included personnel from other branches of the Army and supported two combat groups with Air Service Groups including only Air Corps units. The group was designed to support a single combat group.[3] Its 955th Air Engineering Squadron[1] provided maintenance that was beyond the capability of the combat group, its 779th Air Materiel Squadron[1] handled all supply matters, and its Headquarters & Base Services Squadron provided other support.[3] The 529th supported the 2d Bombardment Group (Bomb Gp).[1] The group moved with the 2d Bomb Gp to Foggia, Italy where it added support responsibility for all military installations in the Foggia Airfield Complex.[4] After the 2nd Bomb Gp returned to the United States, the group was apparently used as a depot unit until it was inactivated in 1946.[4][5]

Cold War

The group was again activated later that year and moved to Dow Field, Maine,[6] where it provided support for the 14th Fighter Group.[7] The group was inactivated and replaced by 14th Airdrome Group,[8][9] 14th Station Medical Group, and 14th Maintenance & Supply Group[10] in the experimental Wing/Base reorganization of 1947, designed to unify control at air bases.[11] The group was disbanded in 1948.[12]

 F-84G as flown briefly by the 83d FIS
F-84G as flown briefly by the 83d FIS

The group was reconstituted, redesignated as the 529th Air Defense Group and activated at Paine Field on 18 February 1953[13] with responsibility for air defense of the Northwestern United States.[citation needed] The 529th was assigned the 83d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron (FIS), which was already stationed at Paine Field, flying Republic F-84 Thunderjets,[14] as its operational component.[15] The 83d FIS had been assigned directly to the 4704th Defense Wing.[15] The group also replaced the 86th Air Base Squadron as USAF host organization at Paine Field. It was assigned three squadrons to perform its support responsibilities.[16][17] It was also assigned the 17th Crash Rescue Boat Flight for water rescue duties.

By December 1953, the 83d FIS converted to radar equipped and Mighty Mouse rocket armed North American F-86D Sabres.[14] When the 4704th Defense Wing was discontinued in 1954, the group was reassigned directly to the 25th Air Division.[13] The group was inactivated[13] and replaced by 326th Fighter Group (Air Defense)[18] in 1955 as part of Air Defense Command's Project Arrow, which was designed to bring back on the active list the fighter units which had compiled memorable records in the two world wars.[19] The group was disbanded again in 1984.[20]

Lineage

  • Constituted as 529th Air Service Group ca. 16 December 1944
Activated on 18 May 1945[1]
Inactivated on 15 September 1946[5]
Activated ca. 1 October 1946
Inactivated on 15 August 1947
Disbanded on 8 October 1948[12]
  • Reconstituted and redesignated 529th Air Defense Group on 21 January 1953
Activated on 16 February 1953[13]
Inactivated on 18 August 1955[13]
Disbanded on 27 September 1984[20]

Assignments

Stations

  • Amendola Airfield, Italy 18 May 1945[1]
  • Foggia, Italy c. July 1945 - unknown[4]
  • Mitchel Field, New York, c. 1 October 1946
  • Dow Field, Maine, ca. 20 November 1946 - 15 August 1947[6]
  • Paine Field, Washington, 16 February 1953 – 18 August 1955[13]

Components

Operational Squadron

  • 83d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 16 February 1953 – 18 August 1955[15]

Support Units

  • 529th Air Base Squadron, 16 February 1953 - 18 August 1955
  • 529th Materiel Squadron, 16 February 1953 - 18 August 1955[16]
  • 529th Medical Squadron (later 529th USAF Infirmary),[17] 16 February 1953 - 18 August 1955
  • 779th Air Materiel Squadron, 18 May 1945 - 15 August 1947[21]
  • 955th Air Engineering Squadron, 18 May 1945 - 15 August 1947[21]
  • 17th Crash Rescue Boat Flight, ca. 16 February 1953 - 18 August 1955

Aircraft

  • Republic F-84G Thunderjet, 1953
  • North American F-86D Sabre, 1953-1955

Commanders

  • Lt Col. James J. Groves, 18 May 1945 - unknown[1]
  • Unknown 16 February 1953 - 18 August 1955

See also

References

Explanatory Note

  1. ^ This aircraft is an F-86L, an improved version of the F-86D the 83d flew while assigned to the 529th

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Abstract, History 529 Air Service Group May-Jun 1945". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Abstract, History 529 Air Service Group Aug-Sep 1946". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Coleman, p. 208
  4. ^ a b c d "Abstract, History 529 Air Service Group Nov 1945". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "Abstract, History 529 Air Service Group Nov 1945". Air Force History Index. Retrieved June 23, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "Abstract, History 529 Air Service Group May-Jun 1947". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012. (erroneously marked as history of 529th Air Service Squadron)
  7. ^ "Abstract, History 14 Fighter Group Nov 45-Jun 1947 (erroneously marked as history of 529th Air Service Squadron)". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Abstract, History 14 Airdrome Group Aug-Sep 1947". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Abstract, History 529 Air Service Group Nov 1945". Air Force History Index. Retrieved June 23, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Abstract, History 14 Maintenance & Supply Group Aug-Sep 1947". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  11. ^ Craven & Cate, Vol. VI, p. 75
  12. ^ a b Department of the Air Force Letter, 322 (AFOOR 887e), 8 October 1948, Subject: Disbandment of Certain Inactive Air Force Units
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h Cornett& Johnson, p. 83
  14. ^ a b Cornett & Johnson, p.119
  15. ^ a b c Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 290
  16. ^ a b Cornett & Johnson, p. 147
  17. ^ a b See "Abstract, History 529 Infirmary Jan-Jun 1955". Air Force History Index. Retrieved June 23, 2012. 
  18. ^ Maurer, Combat Units, p. 208
  19. ^ Buss, Sturm, Volan, & McMullen, p.6
  20. ^ a b Department of the Air Force/MPM Letter 575q, 27 Sep 1984, Subject: Disbandment of Units
  21. ^ a b See "Abstract, History 529 Air Service Group May-Jun 1945". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 9, 2012.  (listing assigned units)

Bibliography

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

Further Reading

External links

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