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380th Expeditionary Operations Group

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

380th Expeditionary Operations Group
380thairexpeditionarygroup-emblem.jpg
Emblem of the 380th Expeditionary Operations Group
Active1991–1994; 2002–present
CountryUnited States
BranchUnited States Air Force
Boeing E-3B Sentry (80-0137) from Tinker AFB, Oklahoma attached to the 968th Expeditionary Airborne Air Control Squadron
Boeing E-3B Sentry (80-0137) from Tinker AFB, Oklahoma attached to the 968th Expeditionary Airborne Air Control Squadron
Lockheed U-2S nicknamed Dragon Lady (80–1077) attached to the 99th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron
Lockheed U-2S nicknamed Dragon Lady (80–1077) attached to the 99th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron

The 380th Expeditionary Operations Group) is the operational flying component of the United States Air Force 380th Air Expeditionary Wing. It is a provisional unit stationed at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, and is assigned to the United States Air Forces Central component of Air Combat Command.

The unit was first activated in 1991 at Plattsburgh Air Force Base, New York as the 380th Wing's operational element. It managed the wing's tankers until the fall of 1994, when flying operations at Plattsburgh ended in preparation for the base's closure in response to the 1993 BRAC recommendations

Overview

The 380 EOG conducts combat air refueling, airborne C2, and ISR in a joint and coalition environment. Its component squadrons are:

History

The group was activated at Plattsburgh Air Force Base, New York and assigned to the 380th Air Refueling Wing in 1991. This was because Strategic Air Command (SAC) was reorganizing its wings under the Objective Wing Organization. When it was disestablished the following year, the group became part of Air Mobility Command. This assignment did not last long, for the 1993 Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended the closure of Plattsburgh AFB and the group was inactivated in October 1994.

The group was reactivated and redesignated as the 380th Expeditionary Operations Group in early 2002 to support the War in Afghanistan. The group participated in Operation Enduring Freedom focused on Afghanistan; and the Iraq War from 2003, including the Iraqi Civil War (2014–2017), which the U.S. Department of Defense codenamed Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn.

Lineage

  • Established as the 380th Operations Group on 29 August 1991
Activated on 1 September 1991
Inactivated on 1 October 1994
  • Redesignated 380th Expeditionary Operations Group and converted to provisional status on 4 December 2001
  • Redesignated as 380th Expeditionary Operations Group in early 2002 and activated.

Assignments

  • 380th Air Refueling Wing, 1 September 1991 – 1 October 1994
  • Air Combat Command to activate or inactivate as needed after 4 December 2001
380th Air Expeditionary Wing, c. January 2002–present

Units

  • 12th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron: 2002-Undetermined
  • 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron: 2002-Undetermined
  • 964th Expeditionary Airborne Air Control Squadron: 2002-Undetermined
  • 99th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron: 2002-Undetermined
  • 380th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron: 2002-Undetermined

Stations

  • Plattsburgh Air Force Base, New York, 1 September 1991 – 1 October 1994
  • Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, c. January 2002 – present

Aircraft

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

Citations

  1. ^ "All-enlisted RPA crew operates out of ADAB". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  2. ^ "Outside Authors". The Washington Institute. 27 October 2019.
  3. ^ "Refueling the refuelers". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  4. ^ "380 AEW AWACS provide the big picture to combatant commanders". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  5. ^ "F-15Cs forward deploy in Exercise Hype Eagle". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  6. ^ "380th AEW fighters support combat air patrol missions in Arabian Gulf". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  7. ^ "ADAB Strike Eagles demonstrate agility and enhance regional defense". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  8. ^ "F-15E Strike Eagles arrive at ADAB to support ongoing operations". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  9. ^ "94th FS and 99th RS celebrate 101 years of service". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.
  10. ^ "ADAB enables kinetic strikes on ISIS stronghold". U.S. Air Forces Central Command. 27 October 2019.

Bibliography

  • Fain, James E.(ed.). The History of the 380th Bomb Group (H), AAF, Affectionately Known as the Flying Circus, November 1942 – September 1945. New York: Commandy-Roth Co., 1946.
  • Horton, Glenn R., Jr. The Best in the Southwest: The 380th Bomb Group in World War II. Savage, Minnesota: Mosie Publications, 1995.
  • King of the Heavies – 380th Bomb Group, 1942–1945, by Glenn R. Horton, Jr., and Gary L. Horton. Library of Congress Card Number 83–90348. Privately published, 1983, 184 pp.
  • Maurer, Maurer (1983). Air Force Combat Units of World War II. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-89201-092-4.
  • Williams, Theodore J., and Gotham, Barbara J., WE WENT TO WAR: A WWII Wartime Roster of the 380th Bombardment Group (H), PART II: A Roster of the Flight Crews of the 380th Bomb Group (H), published by Theodore J. Williams, West Lafayette, Indiana, September 1999.
  • Williams, Theodore J., Gotham, Barbara J., and Goble, Sue, WE WENT TO WAR: A WWII Wartime Roster of the 380th Bombardment Group (H), PART IV: A Listing of MOS/SSNs (Military Occupational Specialties/Service Speciality Numbers) Which Personnel of an Isolated Heavy Bombardment Group Would Probably Need During WWII, published by Theodore J. Williams, West Lafayette, Indiana, September 1999.
  • Williams, Theodore J., and Gotham, Barbara J., WE WENT TO WAR: A WWII Wartime Roster of the 380th Bombardment Group (H), PART VII: Keep 'Em Flying, published by Theodore J. Williams, West Lafayette, Indiana, September 2004.
  • Williams, Theodore J., and Gotham, Barbara J., WE WENT TO WAR: A WWII Wartime Roster of the 380th Bombardment Group (H), PART X: Why We Were in the Southwest Pacific Area: A Review, published by Theodore J. Williams, West Lafayette, Indiana, October 2006.
  • Williams, Theodore J., and Gotham, Barbara J., WE WENT TO WAR: A WWII Wartime Roster of the 380th Bombardment Group (H), PART XI: Our Opposition ~ Japanese Anti-Aircraft Artillery and Fighter Units in the Southwest Pacific, published by Theodore J. Williams, West Lafayette, Indiana, March 2007.
  • 380th.org
  • 380th Expeditionary Operations Group Factsheet

External links

This page was last edited on 25 February 2020, at 16:08
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