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24th Intelligence Squadron

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

24th Intelligence Squadron
Air Combat Command.png
Active1942-1945; 1992–1995; 2003–present
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
RoleIntelligence
Part ofAir Combat Command
Garrison/HQRamstein Air Base, Germany
EngagementsEuropean Theater of Operations
DecorationsDistinguished Unit Citation
Air Force Meritorious Unit Award
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
Belgian Fourragère
Insignia
24th Intelligence Squadron emblem
Emblem of the 24th Intelligence Sq (USAF).jpg
24th Observation Squadron emblem (approved 10 October 1942)[1]
24 Observation Sq emblem.png

The 24th Intelligence Squadron is an active United States Air Force unit stationed at Ramstein Air Base, Germany. The squadron was first activated as the 24th Observation Squadron during World War II. it conducted aerial reconnaissance training, until converting to the photographic mission as the 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron. it deployed to the European Theater of Operations, where it conducted combat reconnaissance missions, earning a Distinguished Unit Citation and being cited in the Belgian Army Order of the Day on two occasions. It remained in Europe following V-E Day, becoming non operational in August 1945. Its ground echelon returned to the United States in the fall of 1945 and it was inactivated at the Port of Embarkation.

The squadron was redesignated the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron and activated in Panama in 1992. It provided intelligence support until it was inactivated in 1995 as the United States withdrew its forces from Panama. The squadron was reactivated in its current role in 2002.

Mission

The 24th Intelligence Squadron plans, directs and conducts multi-source intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) tasking, processing, exploitation and dissemination operations in support of United States Air Forces Europe, United States European Command, United States Africa Command, United States Central Command, NATO, and joint and combined force air component commanders. The squadron operates two primary mission systems: Distributed Common Ground System (DGS-4) and Eagle Vision One.

DGS-4 is a part of the Distributed Common Ground System, which is the Air Force's AN/GSQ-272 "Sentinel" weapon system. DGS-4 is one of five core sites executing collection, processing, exploitation and dissemination of intelligence data derived from Air Force ISR platforms including Lockheed U-2 and General Atomics MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicles. DGS-4 is the only DGS involved in operations across three different commands on a recurring basis.

Eagle Vision One executes collection, processing, exploitation and dissemination of commercial satellite imagery. The 24th Intelligence Squadron’s Eagle Vision One is one of five Eagle Vision systems worldwide. It is the only active duty Eagle Vision unit with its own pool of Eagle Vision imagery analysts. Eagle Vision is a deployable ground station with the capability to produce CSI and geospatial products.

History

World War II reconnaissance

The squadron was first activated at Army Air Base, Wilmington in late February 1942 as the 24th Observation Squadron, one of the three original squadrons of the 76th Observation Group. The squadron trained with various single engine and twin engine aircraft in aerial reconnaissance and ground support missions and supported the training of Army ground units through May 1943. Starting in May 1943, the squadron assisted in Second Army maneuvers.[1][2]

In August 1943, the squadron mission was changed from visual to photographic reconnaissance and it was redesignated the 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron and relieved from the 76th Group. in April 1944, the squadron deployed to the European Theater of Operations.[1]

At its first combat station, RAF Chalgrove, the squadron equipped with long-range Lockheed F-5 Lightnings.[1] The squadron engaged in tactical reconnaissance over the Normandy Beaches of France prior to the Allied invasion on D-Day, 6 June 1944. Afterwards engaged in highly dangerous unarmed reconnaissance of Northern France, the Low Countries and Germany as Allied armies moved west during the Northern France Campaign during the balance of 1944 and the Allied Invasion of Western Germany, spring 1945. Provided battlefield intelligence primarily to the United States Third Army, however also flew reconnaissance missions for the United States First and Ninth Armies as requested.

Assigned to the United States Air Forces in Europe after the V-E Day, was part of the Army of Occupation in Germany before becoming non-operational in August 1945. The squadron inactivated in October 1945.[1]

Intelligence operations

In 1992, the squadron returned to its original number as the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron and was activated at Howard Air Force Base, Panama to provide intelligence support for Air Force activities in South and Central America. It continued this mission until inactivating in 1995[1] as the United States withdrew its forces from Panama.

The squadron reactivated at Ramstein Air Base, Germany on 8 January 2003 as the 24th Intelligence Squadron.[1]

Lineage

  • Constituted as the 24th Observation Squadron (Light) on 5 February 1942
Activated on 6 March 1942
Redesignated 24th Observation Squadron on 4 July 1942
Redesignated 24th Reconnaissance Squadron (Bombardment) on 2 April 1943
Redesignated 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 August 1943
Inactivated on 4 October 1945
  • Redesignated 24th Air Intelligence Squadron on 1 February 1992
Activated on 11 February 1992
Inactivated on 1 December 1995
  • Redesignated 24th Intelligence Squadron on 17 December 2002
Activated on 8 January 2003[1]

Assignments

Stations

aircraft

Awards and campaigns

Award streamer Award Dates Notes
Streamer PUC Army.PNG
Presidential Unit Citation France 6–20 May 1944 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
AF MUA Streamer.JPG
Air Force Meritorious Unit Award 1 June 2014-31 May 2015 24th Intelligence Squadron[1]
AF MUA Streamer.JPG
Air Force Meritorious Unit Award 1 June 2015-31 May 2016 24th Intelligence Squadron[1]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 11 February 1992-31 July 1993 24th Air Intelligence Squadron[1]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 January 2006-31 December 2007 24th Intelligence Squadron[1]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 June 2009-31 May 2011 24th Intelligence Squadron[1]
Blank300.png
Belgian Fourragère [12 August-28] September 1944; [6 November]-17 December 1944; 18 December 1944-[14] January 1945 24th Intelligence Squadron[1]
Campaign Streamer Campaign Dates Notes
World War II - American Campaign Streamer (Plain).png
American Theater without inscription 27 February 1942 – 12 April 1944 24 Observation Squadron (later 24th Reconnaissance Squadron, 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron)[1]
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer.png
Air Offensive, Europe 27 April 1944 – 5 June 1944 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer.png
Normandy 6 June 1944 – 24 July 1944 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer.png
Northern France 25 July 1944 – 14 September 1944 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer.png
Rhineland 15 September 1944 – 21 March 1945 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer.png
Ardennes-Alsace 16 December 1944 – 25 January 1945 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer.png
Central Europe 22 March 1944 – 21 May 1945 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer.png
Air Combat, EAME Theater 27 April 1944 – 11 May 1945 33d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron[1]

References

Notes

Explanatory notes
  1. ^ There were two airfields used by American forces in Braunschweig (Brunswick). Brunswick-Waggum (R-37) and Brunswick-Broitzem (R-38).
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Bailey, Carl E. (6 April 2017). "Factsheet 24 Intelligence Squadron (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  2. ^ Maurer, Combat Units, p. 141
  3. ^ Station Number in Anderson.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Station number in Johnson.

Bibliography

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

External links

This page was last edited on 28 August 2020, at 22:42
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