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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

232 (two hundred [and] thirty-two) is the natural number following 231 and preceding 233.

← 231  232  233 →
Cardinal two hundred thirty-two
Ordinal 232nd
(two hundred thirty-second)
Factorization 23× 29
Prime no
Greek numeral ΣΛΒ´
Roman numeral CCXXXII
Binary 111010002
Ternary 221213
Quaternary 32204
Quinary 14125
Senary 10246
Octal 3508
Duodecimal 17412
Hexadecimal E816
Vigesimal BC20
Base 36 6G36

232 is both a central polygonal number[1] and a cake number.[2] It is both a decagonal number[3] and a centered 11-gonal number.[4] It is also a refactorable number,[5] a Motzkin sum,[6] an idoneal number,[7] and a noncototient.[8]

232 is a telephone number: in a system of seven telephone users, there are 232 different ways of pairing up some of the users.[9][10] There are also exactly 232 different eight-vertex connected indifference graphs, and 232 bracelets with eight beads of one color and seven of another.[11] Because this number has the form 232 = 44 − 4!, it follows that there are exactly 232 different functions from a set of four elements to a proper subset of the same set.[12]

References

  1. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A000124 (Central polygonal numbers (the Lazy Caterer's sequence))". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  2. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A000125 (Cake numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  3. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A001107 (10-gonal (or decagonal) numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  4. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A069125 (Centered 11-gonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. .
  5. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A033950 (Refactorable numbers: number of divisors of n divides n)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  6. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A005043 (Motzkin sums)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  7. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A000926 (Euler's "numerus idoneus" (or "numeri idonei", or idoneal, or suitable, or convenient numbers))". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  8. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A005278 (Noncototients)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  9. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A000085 (Number of self-inverse permutations on n letters, also known as involutions)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  10. ^ Peart, Paul; Woan, Wen-Jin (2000), "Generating functions via Hankel and Stieltjes matrices" (PDF), Journal of Integer Sequences, 3 (2), Article 00.2.1, MR 1778992 .
  11. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A007123 (Number of connected unit interval graphs with n nodes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 
  12. ^ Sloane, N.J.A. (ed.). "Sequence A036679 (n^n - n!)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. 


This page was last edited on 26 March 2018, at 21:16
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