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2026 United States Senate elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2026 United States Senate elections

← 2024 November 3, 2026 2028 →

33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority

2026 United States Senate election in Alabama2026 United States Senate election in Alaska2026 United States Senate election in Arkansas2026 United States Senate election in Colorado2026 United States Senate election in Delaware2026 United States Senate election in Georgia2026 United States Senate election in Idaho2026 United States Senate election in Illinois2026 United States Senate election in Iowa2026 United States Senate election in Kansas2026 United States Senate election in Kentucky2026 United States Senate election in Louisiana2026 United States Senate election in Maine2026 United States Senate election in Massachusetts2026 United States Senate election in Michigan2026 United States Senate election in Minnesota2026 United States Senate election in Mississippi2026 United States Senate election in Montana2026 United States Senate election in Nebraska2026 United States Senate election in New Hampshire2026 United States Senate election in New Jersey2026 United States Senate election in New Mexico2026 United States Senate election in North Carolina2026 United States Senate election in Oklahoma2026 United States Senate election in Oregon2026 United States Senate election in Rhode Island2026 United States Senate election in South Carolina2026 United States Senate election in South Dakota2026 United States Senate election in Tennessee2026 United States Senate election in Texas2026 United States Senate election in Virginia2026 United States Senate election in West Virginia2026 United States Senate election in Wyoming2026 US Senate map.svg
About this image
Map of the incumbents:
     Democratic incumbent
     Republican incumbent
     No election

Incumbent Majority Leader

TBD in 2024



The 2026 United States Senate elections will be held on November 3, 2026, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested in regular elections, the winners of which will serve six-year terms in the United States Congress from January 3, 2027, to January 3, 2033. Senators are divided into three groups, or classes, whose terms are staggered so that a different class is elected every two years. Class 2 senators were last elected in 2020, and will be up for election again in 2026.

Composition

The composition of the Senate going into the 2026 election will depend on the results of the 2022 and 2024 elections. Among the senators up for election in 2026, there will be 13 Democrats and 20 Republicans.

There may be some additional changes if senators die or resign. If senators in other classes die or resign between 2022 and 2026, there may be additional special elections before or during the 2026 elections. The dates between which the death or resignation of a senator would lead a special election during this time period vary from state to state.

Change in composition

Each block represents one of the one hundred seats in the U.S. Senate. "D#" is a Democratic senator, "I#" is an Independent senator, and "R#" is a Republican senator. They are arranged so that the parties are separated and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the elections

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
D13 D12 D11
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
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in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
Majority →
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
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in 2024
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in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2024
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key
D# Democratic
R# Republican

Race summary

The following is the list of state-by-state summaries:

Elections leading to the next Congress

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party
Electoral
history
Alabama Tommy Tuberville Republican 2020
Alaska Dan Sullivan Republican 2014
2020
Arkansas Tom Cotton Republican 2014
2020
Colorado John Hickenlooper Democratic 2020
Delaware Chris Coons Democratic 2010 (Special)
2014
2020
Georgia Jon Ossoff Democratic 2020
Idaho Jim Risch Republican 2008
2014
2020
Illinois Dick Durbin Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
Iowa Joni Ernst Republican 2014
2020
Kansas Roger Marshall Republican 2020
Kentucky Mitch McConnell Republican 1984
1990
1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
Louisiana Bill Cassidy Republican 2014
2020
Maine Susan Collins Republican 1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
Massachusetts Ed Markey Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
2020
Michigan Gary Peters Democratic 2014
2020
Minnesota Tina Smith Democratic 2018 (Appointed)
2018 (Special)
2020
Mississippi Cindy Hyde-Smith Republican 2018 (Appointed)
2018 (Special)
2020
Montana Steve Daines Republican 2014
2020
Nebraska Ben Sasse Republican 2014
2020
New Hampshire Jeanne Shaheen Democratic 2008
2014
2020
New Jersey Cory Booker Democratic 2013 (Special)
2014
2020
New Mexico Ben Ray Luján Democratic 2020
North Carolina Thom Tillis Republican 2014
2020
Oklahoma Jim Inhofe Republican 1994 (Special)
1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
Oregon Jeff Merkley Democratic 2008
2014
2020
Rhode Island Jack Reed Democratic 1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
South Carolina Lindsey Graham Republican 2002
2008
2014
2020
South Dakota Mike Rounds Republican 2014
2020
Tennessee Bill Hagerty Republican 2020
Texas John Cornyn Republican 2002
2008
2014
2020
Virginia Mark Warner Democratic 2008
2014
2020
West Virginia Shelley Moore Capito Republican 2014
2020
Wyoming Cynthia Lummis Republican 2020
State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party
Electoral
history

Alabama

One-term Republican Tommy Tuberville was first elected in 2020 with 60.1% of the vote.

Alaska

Two-term Republican Dan Sullivan was re-elected in 2020 with 53.9% of the vote.

Arkansas

Two-term Republican Tom Cotton was re-elected in 2020 with 66.5% of the vote.

Colorado

One-term Democrat John Hickenlooper was first elected in 2020 with 53.5% of the vote.

Delaware

Two-term Democrat Chris Coons was re-elected in 2020 with 59.4% of the vote.

Georgia

One-term Democrat Jon Ossoff was first elected in 2020 with 50.6% of the vote. He has not yet declared whether or not he will seek a second term, however he has filed papers to run again with the FEC.[1]

Idaho

Three-term Republican Jim Risch was re-elected in 2020 with 62.6% of the vote.

Illinois

Five-term Democrat and Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin was re-elected in 2020 with 54.9% of the vote.

Iowa

Two-term Republican Joni Ernst was re-elected in 2020 with 51.8% of the vote.

Kansas

One-term Republican Roger Marshall was first elected in 2020 with 53.2% of the vote.

Kentucky

Seven-term Republican Mitch McConnell was re-elected in 2020 with 57.8% of the vote. If Chuck Grassley were to retire in 2022 he would be the longest serving Republican in the Senate by this time.

Louisiana

Two-term Republican Bill Cassidy was re-elected in 2020 with 59.3% of the vote.

Maine

Five-term Republican Susan Collins was re-elected in 2020 with 51.0% of the vote.

Massachusetts

Two-term Democrat Ed Markey was re-elected in 2020 with 66.2% of the vote.

Michigan

Two-term Democrat Gary Peters was re-elected in 2020 with 49.9% of the vote.

Minnesota

One-term Democrat Tina Smith was elected in 2020 with 48.7% of the vote, having first been appointed in 2018, then winning the special election that same year.

Mississippi

One-term Republican Cindy Hyde-Smith was elected in 2020, having first been appointed in 2018, then winning the special election that same year.

Montana

Two-term Republican Steve Daines was re-elected in 2020 with 55.0% of the vote.

Nebraska

Two-term Republican Ben Sasse was re-elected in 2020 with 62.7% of the vote.

New Hampshire

Three-term Democrat Jeanne Shaheen was re-elected in 2020 with 56.6% of the vote.

New Jersey

Two-term Democrat Cory Booker was re-elected in 2020 with 57.2% of the vote.

New Mexico

One-term Democrat Ben Ray Luján was first elected in 2020 with 51.7% of the vote.

North Carolina

Two-term Republican Thom Tillis was re-elected in 2020 with 48.7% of the vote.

Oklahoma

Five-term Republican Jim Inhofe was re-elected in 2020 with 62.9% of the vote.

Oregon

Three-term Democrat Jeff Merkley was re-elected in 2020 with 56.9% of the vote.

Rhode Island

Five-term Democrat Jack Reed was re-elected in 2020 with 66.5% of the vote.

South Carolina

Four-term Republican Lindsey Graham was re-elected in 2020 with 54.4% of the vote.

South Dakota

Two-term Republican Mike Rounds was re-elected in 2020 with 65.7% of the vote.

Tennessee

One-term Republican Bill Hagerty was first elected in 2020 with 62.2% of the vote.

Texas

Four-term Republican John Cornyn was re-elected in 2020 with 53.5% of the vote.

Virginia

Three-term Democrat Mark Warner was re-elected in 2020 with 56.0% of the vote.

West Virginia

Two-term Republican Shelley Moore Capito was re-elected in 2020 with 70.3% of the vote.

Wyoming

One-term Republican Cynthia Lummis was first elected in 2020 with 72.9% of the vote.

See also

  • 2026 United States elections

References

  1. ^ @CATargetBot (January 15, 2021). "NEW 2026 FEC F2 T. Jonathan Ossoff (DEM) #GASEN (D-Ossoff)" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
This page was last edited on 18 May 2021, at 01:58
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