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2024 United States Senate elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2024 United States Senate elections

← 2022 November 5, 2024 2026 →

33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority

2024 United States Senate election in Arizona2024 United States Senate election in California2024 United States Senate election in Connecticut2024 United States Senate election in Delaware2024 United States Senate election in Florida2024 United States Senate election in Hawaii2024 United States Senate election in Indiana2024 United States Senate election in Maine2024 United States Senate election in Maryland2024 United States Senate election in Massachusetts2024 United States Senate election in Michigan2024 United States Senate election in Minnesota2024 United States Senate election in Mississippi2024 United States Senate election in Missouri2024 United States Senate election in Montana2024 United States Senate election in Nebraska2024 United States Senate election in Nevada2024 United States Senate election in New Jersey2024 United States Senate election in New Mexico2024 United States Senate election in New York2024 United States Senate election in North Dakota2024 United States Senate election in Ohio2024 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania2024 United States Senate election in Rhode Island2024 United States Senate election in Tennessee2024 United States Senate election in Texas2024 United States Senate election in Utah2024 United States Senate election in Vermont2024 United States Senate election in Virginia2024 United States Senate election in Washington2024 United States Senate election in West Virginia2024 United States Senate election in Wisconsin2024 United States Senate election in Wyoming2024 US Senate map.svg
About this image
Map of the incumbents:
     Democratic incumbent
     Republican incumbent
     Independent incumbent
     No election

Incumbent Majority Leader

TBD in 2022



The 2024 United States Senate elections will be held on November 5, 2024, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested in regular elections, the winners of which will serve six-year terms in the United States Congress from January 3, 2025, to January 3, 2031. Senators are divided into three groups, or classes, whose terms are staggered so that a different class is elected every two years. Class 1 senators were last elected in 2018, and will be up for election again in 2024. These elections will run concurrent with the 2024 United States presidential election.

As of July 2022, no Republican senators have announced they are planning to retire; two Republican senators are running for re-election; four Democratic senators are running for re-election; and no Democratic senators have announced plans for retirement.

Partisan composition

All 33 Class 1 Senate seats are up for election in 2024; Class 1 currently consists of 21 Democrats, 2 independents who caucus with the Senate Democrats, and 10 Republicans. If vacancies occur in Class 2 or Class 3 Senate seats, that state might require a special election to take place during the 118th Congress, possibly concurrently with the other 2024 Senate elections.

Change in composition

Each block represents one of the one hundred seats in the U.S. Senate. "D#" is a Democratic/active senator, "I#" is an Independent senator, and "R#" is a Republican/active senator. They are arranged so that the parties are separated, and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the elections

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20
Mass.
Running
D19
Md.
Undeclared
D18
Hawaii
Undeclared
D17
Del.
Undeclared
D16
Conn.
Undeclared
D15
Calif.
Undeclared
D14
Ariz.
Undeclared
D13 D12 D11
D21
Mich.
Undeclared
D22
Minn.
Undeclared
D23
Mont.
Undeclared
D24
Nev.
Undeclared
D25
N.J.
Running
D26
N.M.
Undeclared
D27
N.Y.
Undeclared
D28
Ohio
Running
D29
Pa.
Undeclared
D30
R.I.
Undeclared
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
I2
Vt.
Undeclared
I1
Maine
Undeclared
D34
Wis.
Undeclared
D33
W.Va.
Undeclared
D32
Wash.
Undeclared
D31
Va.
Undeclared
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
Majority →
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
R21
Fla.
Running
R22
Ind.
Undeclared
R23
Miss.
Undeclared
R24
Mo.
Undeclared
R25
N.D.
Undeclared
R26
Tenn.
Undeclared
R27
Texas
Undeclared
R28
Utah
Undeclared
R29
Wyo.
Undeclared
TBD
in 2022
R20
Neb.
Running
R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
D13 D12 D11
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
Ariz.
TBD
Calif.
TBD
Conn.
TBD
Mont.
TBD
Minn.
TBD
Mich.
TBD
Mass.
TBD
Md.
TBD
Maine
TBD
Ind.
TBD
Hawaii
TBD
Fla.
TBD
Del.
TBD
Miss.
TBD
Mo.
TBD
Neb.
TBD
N.D.
TBD
Nev.
TBD
N.J.
TBD
N.M.
TBD
N.Y.
TBD
Ohio
TBD
Pa.
TBD
Majority →
R.I.
TBD
Wyo.
TBD
Wis.
TBD
W.Va.
TBD
Wash.
TBD
Va.
TBD
Vt.
TBD
Utah
TBD
Texas
TBD
Tenn.
TBD
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
TBD
in 2022
R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent, caucusing with Democrats

Race summary

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history Last race
Arizona Kyrsten Sinema Democratic 2018 50.0% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
California Dianne Feinstein Democratic 1992 (Special)
1994
2000
2006
2012
2018
54.2% D[a] Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Connecticut Chris Murphy Democratic 2012
2018
59.5% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Delaware Tom Carper Democratic 2000
2006
2012
2018
60.0% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Florida Rick Scott Republican 2018 50.1% R Incumbent running
Hawaii Mazie Hirono Democratic 2012
2018
71.2% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Indiana Mike Braun Republican 2018 50.7% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Maine Angus King Independent 2012
2018
54.3% I Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Maryland Ben Cardin Democratic 2006
2012
2018
64.9% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren Democratic 2012
2018
60.3% D Incumbent running
Michigan Debbie Stabenow Democratic 2000
2006
2012
2018
52.3% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Minnesota Amy Klobuchar Democratic 2006
2012
2018
60.3% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Mississippi Roger Wicker Republican 2007 (Appointed)
2008 (Special)
2012
2018
58.5% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Missouri Josh Hawley Republican 2018 51.4% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Montana Jon Tester Democratic 2006
2012
2018
50.3% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Nebraska Deb Fischer Republican 2012
2018
57.7% R Incumbent running
Nevada Jacky Rosen Democratic 2018 50.4% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
New Jersey Bob Menendez Democratic 2006 (Appointed)
2006
2012
2018
54.0% D Incumbent running
New Mexico Martin Heinrich Democratic 2012
2018
54.1% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
New York Kirsten Gillibrand Democratic 2009 (Appointed)
2010 (Special)
2012
2018
67.0% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
North Dakota Kevin Cramer Republican 2018 55.1% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Ohio Sherrod Brown Democratic 2006
2012
2018
53.4% D Incumbent running
Pennsylvania Bob Casey, Jr. Democratic 2006
2012
2018
55.7% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Rhode Island Sheldon Whitehouse Democratic 2006
2012
2018
61.4% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Tennessee Marsha Blackburn Republican 2018 54.7% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Texas Ted Cruz Republican 2012
2018
50.9% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Utah Mitt Romney Republican 2018 62.6% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Vermont Bernie Sanders Independent 2006
2012
2018
67.4% I Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Virginia Tim Kaine Democratic 2012
2018
57.0% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Washington Maria Cantwell Democratic 2000
2006
2012
2018
58.3% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
West Virginia Joe Manchin Democratic 2010 (Special)
2012
2018
49.6% D Incumbent running
Wisconsin Tammy Baldwin Democratic 2012
2018
55.4% D Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD
Wyoming John Barrasso Republican 2007 (Appointed)
2008 (Special)
2012
2018
67.0% R Incumbent's intent unknown
  • TBD

Arizona

One-term Democrat Kyrsten Sinema was elected in 2018 with 50.0% of the vote. Due to her opposition to some of President Joe Biden's agenda, she is vulnerable to a primary challenge. Potential primary challengers include U.S. representative Ruben Gallego, Mayor Kate Gallego of Phoenix, state senator Martin Quezada, as well as Maricopa County Democratic Party official Jade Duran, while potential Republican candidates include outgoing Governor Doug Ducey and Congressman Andy Biggs. Should he run, Ducey would have an advantage in the GOP primary due to his widespread name recognition, however, he would almost certainly face a contested primary due to former President Donald Trump's criticism of him for refusing to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.[8][9][10]

California

Five-term Democrat Dianne Feinstein was re-elected in 2018 with 54.2% of the vote. Despite being 91 in 2024, Feinstein has filed paperwork to run. Feinstein's staff later clarified that this was due to election law technicalities; it was not indicative of her intentions in 2024.[11]

Should Feinstein retire, U.S. Representatives Ro Khanna, Barbara Lee, Katie Porter, and Adam Schiff have been speculated upon as possible candidates.[12][13][14][15]

Connecticut

Two-term Democrat Chris Murphy was re-elected in 2018 with 59.5% of the vote.

Delaware

Four-term Democrat Tom Carper was re-elected in 2018 with 60.0% of the vote. During the Democratic primary of that race, Carper implied that he might retire in 2024, and, when asked about it, said, "This may be the last time."[16] If Carper does retire, U.S. representative Lisa Blunt Rochester is seen as a potential candidate.[17]

Florida

Former Governor and incumbent one-term Republican Rick Scott was elected in 2018 with 50.1% of the vote. He is running for reelection to a second term.[1]

Outgoing U.S. representative Stephanie Murphy has expressed interest in challenging Scott.[18] Another potential candidate is 2016 Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate Patrick Murphy.[19]

Political journalists speculate Senator Scott may be a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 2024.[20]

Hawaii

Two-term Democrat Mazie Hirono was re-elected in 2018 with 71.2% of the vote.

Indiana

One-term Republican Mike Braun was elected in 2018 with 50.8% of the vote.

Maine

Two-term Independent incumbent Angus King was re-elected in 2018 with 54.3% of the vote. He has hinted that he may retire.[21] Former Maine House speaker and 2020 Democratic nominee for Senate Sara Gideon is considered a potential contender.[22]

Maryland

Three-term Democrat Ben Cardin was re-elected in 2018 with 64.9% of the vote. Representative Jamie Raskin has been rumored as a potential candidate to replace Cardin should he retire.[23]

Massachusetts

Two-term Democrat Elizabeth Warren was re-elected in 2018 with 60.3% of the vote. On May 8, 2021, Warren confirmed that she plans to run for a third term.[2]

Outgoing Governor of Massachusetts Charlie Baker may run in the Republican primary.[24]

Michigan

Four-term Democrat Debbie Stabenow was re-elected in 2018 with 52.3% of the vote. If Stabenow retires, State Senator Mallory McMorrow is seen as a potential candidate.[25]

Minnesota

Three-term Democrat Amy Klobuchar was re-elected in 2018 with 60.3% of the vote.

Mississippi

Two-term Republican Roger Wicker was re-elected in 2018 with 58.5% of the vote.

Missouri

One-term Republican Josh Hawley was elected in 2018 with 51.4% of the vote.

Montana

Three-term Democrat Jon Tester was re-elected in 2018 with 50.3% of the vote.

Nebraska

Two-term Republican Deb Fischer was re-elected in 2018 with 57.7% of the vote. On May 14, 2021, Fischer announced she intends to seek re-election, despite previously declaring an intention to retire.[3]

Democrat Alisha Shelton, a mental health practitioner from Omaha, plans to challenge Fischer.[4]

Nevada

One-term Democrat Jacky Rosen was elected in 2018 with 50.4% of the vote.

New Jersey

Three-term Democrat Bob Menendez was re-elected in 2018 with 54.0% of the vote. On July 13, 2021, The New Jersey Globe stated that Menendez plans to run for a fourth term.[5]

New Mexico

Two-term Democrat Martin Heinrich was re-elected in 2018 with 54.1% of the vote.

New York

Two-term Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand was re-elected in 2018 with 67.0% of the vote.

North Dakota

One-term Republican Kevin Cramer was elected in 2018 with 55.1% of the vote.

Democrat Kristin Hedger, a businesswoman and nominee for North Dakota Secretary of State in 2006 has filed paperwork to run for this seat.[26]

Ohio

Three-term Democrat Sherrod Brown was re-elected in 2018 with 53.4% of the vote. Brown plans to run for a fourth term.[6]

Republican Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose is considered a potential challenger to Brown.[27]

Pennsylvania

Three-term Democrat Bob Casey, Jr., was re-elected in 2018 with 55.7% of the vote. Republican businessman and candidate for U.S. Senate in 2022 David McCormick has expressed interest in challenging Casey.[28]

Rhode Island

Three-term Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse was re-elected in 2018 with 61.4% of the vote.

Tennessee

One-term Republican Marsha Blackburn was elected in 2018 with 54.7% of the vote.

Texas

Two-term Republican Ted Cruz was re-elected in 2018 with 50.9% of the vote. Cruz has expressed interest in running for President in 2024[29] Senator Cruz has also long advocated for Congressional term limits.[30]

Former U.S. representative Will Hurd has expressed an interest in primary challenging Cruz.[31]

Democratic U.S Representative Joaquin Castro, and his twin brother former San Antonio Mayor, former United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, and 2020 presidential candidate Julián Castro are considered potential front runners.[32] Former U.S. representative, 2020 presidential candidate, and Cruz's 2018 opponent Beto O'Rourke may be another potential Democratic candidate.[33] O'Rourke is currently running for the governorship. Astronaut Scott Kelly, the identical twin brother of the junior Democratic senator for Arizona Mark Kelly, has also expressed interest in running.[34]

Utah

One-term Republican Mitt Romney was elected in 2018 with 62.6% of the vote. Romney has expressed uncertainty over his political future.[35] Utah attorney general Sean Reyes has expressed interest in challenging Romney in the Republican primary.[36] Former U.S. Representative Jason Chaffetz is also seen as a potential primary challenger.[35]

Vermont

Three-term Independent Bernie Sanders was re-elected in 2018 with 67.4% of the vote.

Potential Democratic candidates include Vermont attorney general T. J. Donovan[37] and former Vermont lieutenant governor David Zuckerman,[38] a Progressive.[39]

Virginia

Two-term Democrat Tim Kaine was re-elected in 2018 with 57.0% of the vote. Republican Governor Glenn Youngkin is term-limited in 2025 and may run against Kaine.[40]

Washington

Four-term Democrat Maria Cantwell was re-elected in 2018 with 58.3% of the vote.

West Virginia

Two-term Democrat Joe Manchin was re-elected in 2018 with 49.6% of the vote. Manchin plans to run for a third full term.[7]

Republican representative Alex Mooney has expressed interest in challenging Manchin.[41][42]

Manchin has received the endorsements of U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK).[6]

Wisconsin

Two-term Democrat Tammy Baldwin was re-elected in 2018 with 55.4% of the vote.

Wyoming

Two-term Republican John Barrasso was re-elected in 2018 with 67.0% of the vote.

Notes

  1. ^ Against fellow Democrat

References

  1. ^ a b Fineout, Gary (November 12, 2021). "Rick Scott to run for reelection in '24". Politico. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  2. ^ a b Thompson, Alex (May 8, 2021). "Warren says she will run for reelection in 2024". Politico.
  3. ^ a b Walton, Don. "Fischer says she'll seek third Senate term in 2024". JournalStar.com. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  4. ^ a b "Watch Now: Chris Janicek Won't Quit Senate Race, Democrats Eye Write-In Candidate". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Menendez builds warchest for 2024 re-election campaign". July 14, 2021.
  6. ^ a b c Everett, Burgess (July 26, 2021). "Manchin weighs another term as his influence peaks". politico.
  7. ^ a b Schwartz, Brian (October 12, 2021). "Billionaire Peltz draws GOP megadonors to $5,000-a-plate fundraiser for Democrat Sen. Joe Manchin". CNBC. Over a lunch choice of chicken or fish, Manchin told the crowd of donors that he plans to run for reelection in 2024...
  8. ^ Seitz-Wald, Alex; Kapur, Sahil (September 30, 2021). "Could Sen. Kyrsten Sinema face a primary? These progressives are trying to make it happen". NBC News. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
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  10. ^ Dorman, John L. (January 15, 2022). "Trump says he will 'never' endorse Republican Doug Ducey if the Arizona governor jumps into the state's 2022 Senate race". Business Insider.
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  19. ^ Schmitz, Ali (April 24, 2018). "Patrick Murphy says supporters are polling, want him to run for governor". TCPalm. Retrieved October 3, 2020.
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  22. ^ Caitlin Andrews; Jessica Piper; Michael Shepherd (April 16, 2021). "Sara Gideon still has $11M left over from her failed bid to unseat Susan Collins". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved July 11, 2021.
  23. ^ "Raskin will seek reelection, sidesteps questions about other ambitions". WTOP News. February 20, 2021. Retrieved May 13, 2022.
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  28. ^ "GOP sets its sights on Bob Casey's Senate seat". Politico.
  29. ^ Seddiq, Oma (July 2, 2021). "Ted Cruz mulls 2024 presidential bid, says his 2016 campaign 'was the most fun I've ever had in my life'". Insider Inc.
  30. ^ Allen, Cynthia (February 1, 2021). "Ted Cruz is right: Lawmakers in Congress should be forced out by term limits". Retrieved August 10, 2021.
  31. ^ "Former GOP Rep. Will Hurd Leaves The Door Open To Primarying Ted Cruz". Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  32. ^ Conant, Ericka (January 12, 2021). "If Sen. Ted Cruz doesn't resign, who could defeat him in 2024?". Al Día. Retrieved March 20, 2022.
  33. ^ Kinnaird, Robert (November 19, 2019). "An open letter to Beto O'Rourke: We're not mad, just disappointed". The Hofstra Chronicle. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  34. ^ Kelly, Scott [@StationCDRKelly] (January 8, 2021). "Can you please run for senate against Ted Cruz? Hmm...maybe" (Tweet). Retrieved January 9, 2021 – via Twitter.
  35. ^ a b "Romney, now a GOP maverick, undecided on future in politics". The Hill. April 13, 2022.
  36. ^ Allison, Natalie; Lippman, Daniel (March 16, 2022). "Top Trump ally gears up for Romney primary challenge". Politico.com.
  37. ^ Davis, Eric (October 24, 2019). "Vermont elections may lack drama". Addison County Independent. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  38. ^ Xander Landen & Kit Norton (October 29, 2019). "Democrats poll Zuckerman and Donovan for governor as Holcombe presses ahead". VTDigger. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  39. ^ Landen, Xander (December 6, 2020). "Election results 'make room' for new leaders in the Progressive Party". VTDigger. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
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