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2022 United States elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2022 United States elections
2020          2021          2022          2023          2024
Midterm elections
Election dayNovember 8
Incumbent presidentJoe Biden (Democratic)
Next Congress118th
Senate elections
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
2022 United States Senate special election in Oklahoma2022 United States Senate election in Alabama2022 United States Senate election in Alaska2022 United States Senate election in Arizona2022 United States Senate election in Arkansas2022 United States Senate election in California2022 United States Senate election in Colorado2022 United States Senate election in Connecticut2022 United States Senate election in Florida2022 United States Senate election in Georgia2022 United States Senate election in Hawaii2022 United States Senate election in Idaho2022 United States Senate election in Illinois2022 United States Senate election in Indiana2022 United States Senate election in Iowa2022 United States Senate election in Kansas2022 United States Senate election in Kentucky2022 United States Senate election in Louisiana2022 United States Senate election in Maryland2022 United States Senate election in Missouri2022 United States Senate election in Nevada2022 United States Senate election in New Hampshire2022 United States Senate election in New York2022 United States Senate election in North Carolina2022 United States Senate election in North Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Ohio2022 United States Senate election in Oklahoma2022 United States Senate election in Oregon2022 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania2022 United States Senate election in South Carolina2022 United States Senate election in South Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Utah2022 United States Senate election in Vermont2022 United States Senate election in Washington2022 United States Senate election in Wisconsin2022 US Senate map.svg
About this image
Map of the 2022 Senate races
     Democrat incumbent running      Democrat incumbent retiring
     Republican incumbent running      Republican incumbent retiring
     No election
House elections
Seats contestedAll 435 voting seats
+5 of 6 non-voting seats
US House 2022 retirements.svg
Map of the 2022 House races
     Democratic incumbent running      Democratic incumbent retiring or lost renomination
     Republican incumbent running      Republican incumbent retiring or lost renomination
     Democratic and Republican incumbent running
     Vacant or new district
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested39 (36 states, 3 territories)
2022 Alabama gubernatorial election2022 Alaska gubernatorial election2022 Arizona gubernatorial election2022 Arkansas gubernatorial election2022 California gubernatorial election2022 Colorado gubernatorial election2022 Connecticut gubernatorial election2022 Florida gubernatorial election2022 Georgia gubernatorial election2022 Hawaii gubernatorial election2022 Idaho gubernatorial election2022 Illinois gubernatorial election2022 Iowa gubernatorial election2022 Kansas gubernatorial election2022 Maine gubernatorial election2022 Maryland gubernatorial election2022 Massachusetts gubernatorial election2022 Michigan gubernatorial election2022 Minnesota gubernatorial election2022 Nebraska gubernatorial election2022 Nevada gubernatorial election2022 New Hampshire gubernatorial election2022 New Mexico gubernatorial election2022 New York gubernatorial election2022 Ohio gubernatorial election2022 Oklahoma gubernatorial election2022 Oregon gubernatorial election2022 Pennsylvania gubernatorial election2022 Rhode Island gubernatorial election2022 South Carolina gubernatorial election2022 South Dakota gubernatorial election2022 Tennessee gubernatorial election2022 Texas gubernatorial election2022 Vermont gubernatorial election2022 Wisconsin gubernatorial election2022 Wyoming gubernatorial election2022 Guam gubernatorial election2022 Northern Mariana Islands gubernatorial election2022 United States Virgin Islands gubernatorial election2022 United States gubernatorial elections.svg
About this image
Map of the 2022 gubernatorial elections
     Democratic incumbent      Term-limited or retiring Democrat
     Republican incumbent      Term-limited or retiring Republican
     No election

The 2022 United States elections will be held on Tuesday, November 8, 2022. During this midterm election year, all 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate will be contested. Thirty-nine state and territorial gubernatorial and numerous other state and local elections will also be contested. This will be the first election affected by the redistricting that will follow the 2020 census.

Campaign

Primaries

In June 2022, The New York Times reported that Democratic campaign arms were aiding far-right candidates in Republican primaries, believing they would be easier opponents in the general election.[1] Republican primary candidates who had been endorsed by former Republican president Donald Trump tended to win.[2] For some of the winners, his support was crucial.[3]

Progressives who planned to shift the Democratic Party to the left have seen mixed results, with progressives and centrists both winning important races.[4]

Issues

Abortion

After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that overturned Roe v. Wade in June, Democrats outperformed Biden's 2020 results in several House special elections. The ruling has made abortion more important for voters. Women who left the Democratic Party after the 2020 election are returning.[5][6] At least six states have an abortion-related ballot initiative, the most ever in a single year.[7]

Economy

Republicans are benefitting from economic trouble, although the slowing of inflation has eroded a Republican advantage.[6]

Guns

Recent mass shootings have made gun violence more important for Democratic and independent voters.[8]

Presidency of Joe Biden

Republicans are benefitting from incumbent Democratic president Joe Biden's low approval ratings.[6] His ratings have however increased after several legislative victories, increasing Democrats' prospects.[9]

Russian invasion of Ukraine

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has become a major topic, shifting support for Biden and highlighting former President Trump's and his allies' perceived support for Russia.[10][11]

Student loan forgiveness

Since Biden revealed a plan for student loan forgiveness, both parties seek electoral gains from the decision with Republicans targeting blue-collar workers and Democrats potentially attracting young voters.[12]

Federal elections

Senate elections

Thirty-five of the 100 seats in the Senate will be up for election, including all 34 Class 3 seats. A special election is being held to fill a vacancy from another Senate class. As senators serve six-year terms, the last regularly scheduled elections for Class 3 senators were held in 2016. The winners of the United States Senate elections will be sworn in on January 3, 2023, for the 118th Congress.

Special elections

Two special elections will take place in 2022 to replace senators who resigned during the 117th Congress:

House of Representatives elections

All 435 voting seats in the House of Representatives will be up for election. Fifty-one representatives and one non-voting delegate (32 Democrats, 20 Republicans) have announced that they will be retiring or resigning early. The incumbents in these races were determined in the 2020 House of Representatives elections and subsequent special elections. As these elections will be the first conducted after the post-2020 census redistricting, several districts lack an incumbent or have multiple incumbents.

Special elections

Eight special elections have already been held for the House of Representatives in 2022:

One other special election will take place in 2022 to replace a member who died in office during the 117th Congress:

State elections

Gubernatorial elections

Elections will be held for the governorships of 36 states and three territories. As most governors serve four-year terms, the last regularly-scheduled elections for most seats up for election in 2022 were held in 2018. The governors of New Hampshire and Vermont each serve two-year terms, so incumbents in these two states were determined by the 2020 gubernatorial elections.

Attorney General elections

Incumbents' statuses for the 2022 US Attorney General elections.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Republican incumbent  Democratic incumbent  Term-limited or retiring Republican  Term-limited or retiring Democrat  No election
Incumbents' statuses for the 2022 US Attorney General elections
  Republican incumbent
  Democratic incumbent
  Term-limited or retiring Republican
  Term-limited or retiring Democrat
  No election

Attorneys general will be elected in thirty states, three territories, and one federal district. The previous elections for this group of states took place in 2018. The attorney general of Vermont serves two-year terms and was last elected in 2020.[32]

Secretary of State elections

Secretaries of state will be elected in twenty-seven states. The previous elections for this group of states took place in 2018. The secretary of state of Vermont serves two-year terms and was last elected in 2020.[33]

State Treasurer elections

State treasurers and equivalents will be elected in twenty-seven states, plus a special election in Utah. The previous elections for this group of states took place in 2018. The treasurer of Vermont serves two-year terms and was last elected in 2020.

Legislative elections

The vast majority of states and territories will hold legislative elections in 2022. Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Virginia will not hold state legislative elections, as those states all hold such elections in odd-numbered years. In states that use staggered terms, some state senators will not be up for election. As these elections will be the first conducted after the 2020 census redistricting, several legislative districts may lack an incumbent or have multiple incumbents.

Referendums

Six states have an abortion‑related ballot measure in response to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that gave individual states the full power to regulate any aspect of abortion: California, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, and Vermont.[7] During the August primaries, 59% of Kansas voters rejected their state's "Value Them Both Amendment," which would have removed the right to an abortion from the Kansas Constitution.[34] California voters will consider Proposition 1 during the general election, which would amend the Constitution of California to explicitly grant the right to an abortion and contraceptives.[35]

In Tennessee, voters will decide on Amendment 1, which would amend the Constitution of Tennessee to make it illegal for workplaces to require employees to be members of a labor unions, as a condition for employment.[36]

Local elections

Mayoral elections

A number of major U.S. cities have held mayoral elections in 2022:

Eligible

Ineligible or retiring

County elections

Tribal elections

Several notable Native American tribes held elections for tribal executive positions during 2022, including the Penobscot Nation, Navajo Nation, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, Quapaw Nation, and Pueblo of Zuni.

During 2022, Osage Nation Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear[52] and Tribal Council Chief Beverly Kiohawiton Cook of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe[53] were both reelected to third terms. Chairman Marshalle Pierite of the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe[54] and Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma Chief Craig Harper[55] were reelected for a second term.

Reid D. Milanovich was elected chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, replacing the retiring Jeff Grubbe.[56] Clayton Dumont Jr. won an open seat to become chairman of the Klamath Tribes.[57]

Several tribal leaders were defeated when seeking reelection. Lora Ann Chaisson defeated August "Cocoa" Creppel in the election for principal chief of the United Houma Nation.[58] Kasey Velasquez defeated chairwoman Gwendena Lee-Gatwood to become the second woman elected to lead the White Mountain Apache Tribe.[59] RoseMary LaClair defeated incumbent Nooksack Indian Tribe Tribal Chairman Roswell Cline Sr.[60] And former Red Lake Band of Chippewa Chairman Floyd "Buck" Jourdain defeated incumbent Tribal Chairman Darrell Seki Sr.[61]

Table of state, territorial, and federal results

This table shows the partisan results of president, congressional, gubernatorial, and state legislative races held in each state and territory in 2022. Note that not all states and territories hold gubernatorial, state legislative, and Senate elections in 2022. The five territories and Washington, D.C., do not elect members of the Senate, and the territories do not take part in presidential elections; instead, they each elect one non-voting member of the House. Nebraska's unicameral legislature and the governorship and legislature of American Samoa are elected on a non-partisan basis, and political party affiliation is not listed.

Subdivision and PVI[62] Before 2022 elections After 2022 elections
Subdivision 2022
PVI
Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
 
Alabama R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1
Alaska R+8 Rep Split[b] Rep Dem 1–0
Arizona R+2 Rep Rep Dem Dem 5–4
Arkansas R+16 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0
California D+13 Dem Dem Dem Dem 42–11
Colorado D+4 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–3
Connecticut D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0
Delaware D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0 Dem Dem
Florida R+3 Rep Rep Rep Rep 16–11
Georgia R+3 Rep Rep Dem Rep 8–6
Hawaii D+14 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
Idaho R+18 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0
Illinois D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 13–5
Indiana R+11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep
Iowa R+6 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Kansas R+10 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Kentucky R+16 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem
Louisiana R+12 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep
Maine D+2 Dem Dem Split R/I[c] Dem 2–0 Split R/I[c]
Maryland D+14 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1
Massachusetts D+15 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0 Dem
Michigan R+1 Dem Rep Dem Split 7–7 Dem
Minnesota D+1 Dem Split Dem Split 4–4 Dem
Mississippi R+11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep Rep
Missouri R+10 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2 Rep
Montana R+11 Rep Rep Split Rep 1–0 Rep Split
Nebraska R+13 Rep NP[d] Rep Rep 3–0 NP[d] Rep
Nevada R+1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–1
New Hampshire D+1 Rep Rep Dem Dem 2–0
New Jersey D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 10–2 Dem Dem Dem
New Mexico D+3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–1 Dem
New York D+10 Dem Dem Dem Dem 19–8
North Carolina R+3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 8–5 Dem
North Dakota R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Ohio R+6 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4
Oklahoma R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–0
Oregon D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1
Pennsylvania R+2 Dem Rep Split Split 9–9
Rhode Island D+8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem
South Carolina R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1
South Dakota R+16 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
Tennessee R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep
Texas R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 24–12 Rep
Utah R+13 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep
Vermont D+16 Rep Dem Split D/I[e] Dem 1–0
Virginia D+3 Rep Split Dem Dem 7–4 Rep Split Dem
Washington D+8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–3 Dem
West Virginia R+22 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0 Rep Split
Wisconsin R+2 Dem Rep Split Rep 5–3
Wyoming R+25 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
United States Even Rep 28–22 Rep 29–17–3 Dem 50–50 Dem 222–213
Washington, D. C. D+43 Dem[f] Dem[f] Dem
American Samoa NP/D[g] NP Rep NP/D[g] NP
Guam Dem Dem Dem
N. Mariana Islands Rep Split[h] Dem[i]
Puerto Rico PNP/D[j] PDP PNP/R[k] PNP/D[j] PDP PNP/R[k]
U.S. Virgin Islands Dem Dem Dem
Subdivision PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Subdivision and PVI Before 2022 elections After 2022 elections

Notes

  1. ^ Eric Garcetti has been nominated to the post of United States Ambassador to India and it is currently unknown if he will end his term early. Should this occur, the Los Angeles City Council will appoint an interim mayor to finish the remainder of his term.
  2. ^ Republicans won a majority of seats in the state house, but Democrats formed a majority coalition with independents and some Republicans.
  3. ^ a b One of Maine's senators, Susan Collins, is a Republican. The other senator from Maine, Angus King, is an independent who has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2013.
  4. ^ a b The unicameral Nebraska Legislature is officially nonpartisan, but a majority of its members identify as Republicans.
  5. ^ One of Vermont's senators, Patrick Leahy, is a Democrat. The other senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders, was elected as an independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2007.
  6. ^ a b Washington, D.C., does not elect a governor or state legislature, but it does elect a mayor and a council. If the city attains statehood, the mayoral and council elections will be repurposed as those for the governor and House of Delegates respectively.
  7. ^ a b Although elections for governor of American Samoa are non-partisan, Governor Lemanu Peleti Mauga affiliates with the Democratic Party.
  8. ^ Republicans control the Northern Mariana Islands Senate, but no party holds a majority in the Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives.
  9. ^ The Northern Mariana Islands' delegate to Congress, Gregorio Sablan, was elected as an Independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2009. In 2021, he rejoined the local Democratic Party and ran as a Democrat in 2022.
  10. ^ a b Puerto Rican Governor Pedro Pierluisi is a member of the Puerto Rican New Progressive Party, but affiliates with the Democratic Party at the national level.
  11. ^ a b Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner, Jenniffer González, was elected as a member of the New Progressive Party and has caucused with the Republicans since taking office in 2017.

References

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