To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2022 United States Senate elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2022 United States Senate elections

← 2020 November 8, 2022 2024 →

35 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority
 
Chuck Schumer official photo (cropped).jpg
Mitch McConnell 2016 official photo (cropped).jpg
Leader Chuck Schumer Mitch McConnell
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since January 3, 2017 January 3, 2007
Leader's seat New York Kentucky
Last election 48[a][b] 50
Seats needed Steady Increase 1
Seats up 14 21

 
Party Independent
Current seats 2[a]
Seats up 0

2022 United States Senate special election in Oklahoma2022 United States Senate election in Alabama2022 United States Senate election in Alaska2022 United States Senate election in Arizona2022 United States Senate election in Arkansas2022 United States Senate election in California2022 United States Senate election in Colorado2022 United States Senate election in Connecticut2022 United States Senate election in Florida2022 United States Senate election in Georgia2022 United States Senate election in Hawaii2022 United States Senate election in Idaho2022 United States Senate election in Illinois2022 United States Senate election in Indiana2022 United States Senate election in Iowa2022 United States Senate election in Kansas2022 United States Senate election in Kentucky2022 United States Senate election in Louisiana2022 United States Senate election in Maryland2022 United States Senate election in Missouri2022 United States Senate election in Nevada2022 United States Senate election in New Hampshire2022 United States Senate election in New York2022 United States Senate election in North Carolina2022 United States Senate election in North Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Ohio2022 United States Senate election in Oklahoma2022 United States Senate election in Oregon2022 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania2022 United States Senate election in South Carolina2022 United States Senate election in South Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Utah2022 United States Senate election in Vermont2022 United States Senate election in Washington2022 United States Senate election in Wisconsin2022 US Senate map.svg
About this image
Map of the incumbents:
     Democratic incumbent running      Democratic incumbent retiring
     Republican incumbent running      Republican incumbent retiring
     No election
Rectangular inset (Oklahoma): both seats up for election

Incumbent Majority Leader

Chuck Schumer
Democratic



The 2022 United States Senate elections will be held on November 8, 2022, with 34 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested in regular elections, the winners of which will serve six-year terms in the United States Congress from January 3, 2023, to January 3, 2029. Senators are divided into three groups, or classes, whose terms are staggered so that a different class is elected every two years. Class 3 senators, who were last elected in 2016, will be up for election again in 2022.

All 34 Class 3 Senate seats are up for election in 2022; Class 3 currently consists of 14 Democrats and 20 Republicans. Two special elections will also be held—in California to fill the final weeks of Kamala Harris's term[1] and in Oklahoma to serve the four remaining years of Jim Inhofe's term.

Six Republican senators, Richard Shelby (Alabama), Roy Blunt (Missouri), Richard Burr (North Carolina), Rob Portman (Ohio), Jim Inhofe (Oklahoma), Pat Toomey (Pennsylvania), as well as one Democratic senator, Patrick Leahy (Vermont), have announced that they are not seeking re-election; 15 Republicans and 13 Democrats are running for re-election.

Numerous other federal, state, and local elections, including the 2022 House elections, will also be held on this date. The winners of this election will serve beginning in the 118th United States Congress. Democrats have held a majority in the Senate since January 20, 2021, following the party's twin victories in the runoffs for Georgia's regularly-scheduled and special 2020 Senate elections, and the inauguration of Democrat Kamala Harris as vice president. There are 48 Democratic senators and two independent senators who caucus with them; with Harris's tie-breaking vote, the Democrats hold an effective 51-seat majority in the chamber.

This will be the first US Senate election in history in which multiple races are contested between two African-American nominees (Georgia and South Carolina).

Partisan composition

Parties Total
Democratic Independent Republican
Last election (2020) 48 2 50 100
Before these elections 48 2 50 100
Not up 34 2 30 66
Class 1 (20182024) 21 2 10 33
Class 2 (20202026) 13 0 20 33
Up 14 0 20 34
Class 3 (2016→2022) 14 0 20 34
Special: Class 2 & 3 1 1 2
General election
Incumbent retiring (declared) 1 6 7
Incumbent running (declared) 13 15 28
Special elections
Appointee running 1 0 1

In contrast to 2018, where Democrats were defending 10 seats in states that Donald Trump won in 2016, Democrats hold no seats in any state that was won by Trump in 2020. Meanwhile, the GOP is defending two seats (Wisconsin and Pennsylvania) in states President Joe Biden won in 2020, compared to just one seat (Nevada won by Hillary Clinton in 2016) that was up for grabs in 2018.

Change in composition

Each block represents one of the one hundred seats in the U.S. Senate. "D#" is a Democratic senator, "I#" is an Independent senator, and "R#" is a Republican senator. They are arranged so the parties are separated and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the elections

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40
Hawaii
Running
D39
Ga.
Running
D38
Conn.
Running
D37
Colo.
Running
D36
Calif.
Running
D35
Ariz.
Running
D34 D33 D32 D31
D41
Ill.
Running
D42
Md.
Running
D43
Nev.
Running
D44
N.H.
Running
D45
N.Y.
Running
D46
Ore.
Running
D47
Vt.
Retiring
D48
Wash.
Running
I1 I2
Majority (with Independents and Vice President) ↑
R41
N.C.
Retiring
R42
N.D.
Running
R43
Ohio
Retiring
R44
Okla. (reg)
Running
R45
Okla. (sp)
Retiring
R46
Pa.
Retiring
R47
S.C.
Running
R48
S.D.
Running
R49
Utah
Running
R50
Wisc.
Running
R40
Mo.
Retiring
R39
La.
Running
R38
Ky.
Running
R37
Kans.
Running
R36
Iowa
Running
R35
Ind.
Running
R34
Idaho
Running
R33
Fla.
Running
R32
Ark.
Running
R31
Alaska
Running
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
Ala.
Retiring
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
Ark.
TBD
Ariz.
TBD
Alaska
TBD
Ala.
TBD
I2 I1 D34 D33 D32 D31
Calif.
TBD
Colo.
TBD
Conn.
TBD
Fla.
TBD
Ga.
TBD
Hawaii
TBD
Idaho
TBD
Ill.
TBD
Ind.
TBD
Iowa
TBD
Majority TBD →
Kans.
TBD
N.D.
TBD
N.C.
TBD
N.Y.
TBD
N.H.
TBD
Nev.
TBD
Mo.
TBD
Md.
TBD
La.
TBD
Ky.
TBD
Ohio
TBD
Okla. (sp)
TBD
Okla. (reg)
TBD
Ore.
TBD
Pa.
TBD
S.C.
TBD
S.D.
TBD
Utah
TBD
Vt.
TBD
Wash.
TBD
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 Wisc.
TBD
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent, caucusing with Democrats

Predictions

Several sites and individuals publish predictions of competitive seats. These predictions look at factors such as the strength of the incumbent (if the incumbent is running for re-election) and the other candidates and the state's partisan lean (reflected in part by the state's Cook Partisan Voting Index rating). The predictions assign ratings to each seat, indicating the predicted advantage that a party had in winning that seat. Most election predictors use:

  • "tossup" / "battleground": no advantage
  • "tilt" (used by some predictors): minimal, smallest advantage
  • "lean": slight advantage
  • "likely": significant, but surmountable, advantage
  • "safe" or "solid": near-certain chance of victory
Constituency Incumbent 2022 election ratings
State PVI[2] Senator Last
election[c]
Cook
March 4,
2022
[3]
IE
July 1,
2022
[4]
Sabato
June 15,
2022
[5]
Politico
June 8,
2022
[6]
RCP
June 14,
2022
[7]
Fox
May 12,
2022
[8]
538[d][e]
June 30,
2022
[9]
Alabama R+15 Richard Shelby
(retiring)
64.0% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Likely R Solid R Solid R
Alaska R+9 Lisa Murkowski 44.4% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Likely R Likely R Solid R Solid R
Arizona R+3 Mark Kelly 51.2% D
(2020 special)[f]
Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
Arkansas R+16 John Boozman 59.8% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
California[g] D+14 Alex Padilla Appointed
(2021)[h]
Solid D Solid D Safe D Solid D Safe D Solid D Solid D
Colorado D+3 Michael Bennet 50.0% D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Lean D Lean D Likely D
Connecticut D+7 Richard Blumenthal 63.2% D Solid D Solid D Safe D Solid D Likely D Solid D Solid D
Florida R+3 Marco Rubio 52.0% R Lean R Likely R Likely R Likely R Lean R Lean R Likely R
Georgia R+3 Raphael Warnock 51.0% D
(2020 special)[i]
Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
Hawaii D+15 Brian Schatz 73.6% D Solid D Solid D Safe D Solid D Safe D Solid D Solid D
Idaho R+19 Mike Crapo 66.1% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Illinois D+7 Tammy Duckworth 54.9% D Solid D Solid D Safe D Solid D Likely D Solid D Solid D
Indiana R+11 Todd Young 52.1% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Iowa R+6 Chuck Grassley 60.1% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Kansas R+11 Jerry Moran 62.2% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Kentucky R+16 Rand Paul 57.3% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Likely R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Louisiana R+12 John Kennedy 60.7% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Maryland D+14 Chris Van Hollen 60.9% D Solid D Solid D Safe D Solid D Safe D Solid D Solid D
Missouri R+11 Roy Blunt
(retiring)
49.2% R Solid R Solid R Likely R Likely R Lean R Likely R Likely R
Nevada EVEN Catherine Cortez Masto 47.1% D Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
New Hampshire EVEN Maggie Hassan 48.0% D Lean D Tilt D Lean D Lean D Tossup Tossup Lean D
New York D+10 Chuck Schumer 70.6% D Solid D Solid D Safe D Solid D Safe D Solid D Solid D
North Carolina R+3 Richard Burr
(retiring)
51.1% R Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Tossup Lean R Likely R
North Dakota R+20 John Hoeven 78.5% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Ohio R+6 Rob Portman
(retiring)
58.0% R Lean R Solid R Likely R Likely R Lean R Likely R Likely R
Oklahoma R+20 James Lankford 67.7% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Oklahoma
(special)
R+20 Jim Inhofe
(retiring)
62.9% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Oregon D+6 Ron Wyden 56.6% D Solid D Solid D Safe D Solid D Safe D Solid D Solid D
Pennsylvania R+2 Pat Toomey
(retiring)
48.8% R Tossup Tilt R Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup
South Carolina R+8 Tim Scott 60.6% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
South Dakota R+16 John Thune 71.8% R Solid R Solid R Safe R Solid R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Utah R+13 Mike Lee 68.2% R Solid R Solid R Likely R Likely R Safe R Solid R Solid R
Vermont D+15 Patrick Leahy
(retiring)
61.3% D Solid D Solid D Safe D Likely D Safe D Solid D Solid D
Washington D+8 Patty Murray 58.8% D Solid D Likely D Likely D Likely D Lean D Likely D Likely D
Wisconsin R+2 Ron Johnson 50.2% R Tossup Tilt R Lean R Tossup Tossup Lean R Lean R
Overall[j] D – 47
R – 48
5 tossups
D – 47
R – 50
3 tossups
D – 47
R – 49
4 tossups
D – 47
R – 48
5 tossups
D – 46
R – 47
7 tossups
D – 46
R – 49
5 tossups
D – 47
R – 49
4 tossups

Retirements

Democrats

One Democrat has announced his retirement.

State Senator Ref
Vermont Patrick Leahy [10]

Republicans

Six Republicans have announced their retirement.

State Senator Ref
Alabama Richard Shelby [11]
Missouri Roy Blunt [12]
North Carolina Richard Burr [13]
Ohio Rob Portman [14]
Oklahoma Jim Inhofe [15]
Pennsylvania Pat Toomey [16]

Race summary

Special elections during the preceding Congress

In each special election, the winner's term begins immediately after their election is certified by their state's government.

Elections are sorted by date then state.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Status Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
California
(Class 3)
Alex Padilla Democratic 2021 (Appointed) Interim appointee nominated
Oklahoma
(Class 2)
Jim Inhofe Republican 1994 (special)
1996
2002
2008
2014
2020
Incumbent resigning January 3, 2023[15]

Elections leading to the next Congress

In these general elections, the winners will be elected for the term beginning January 3, 2023.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Status Major candidates[k][l]
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama Richard Shelby Republican 1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent retiring[19]
Alaska Lisa Murkowski Republican 2002 (appointed)
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent running
  • Edgar Blatchford (Democratic)[22]
  • Patricia Chesbro (Democratic)[22]
  • Dave Darden (Independent)[22]
  • Dustin Darden (Alaskan Independence)[22]
  • Shoshana Gungurstein (Independent)[22]
  • Sidney Hill (Independent)[22]
  • Buzz Kelley (Republican)[22]
  • Jeremy Keller (Independent)[22]
  • Huhnkie Lee (Independent)[22]
  • Samuel Merrill (Republican)[22]
  • Lisa Murkowski (Republican)[22]
  • Pat Nolin (Republican)[22]
  • John Schiess (Republican)[22]
  • Kendall Shorkey (Republican)[22]
  • Karl Speights (Republican)[22]
  • Joe Stephens (Alaskan Independence)[22]
  • Ivan Taylor (Democratic)[22]
  • Sean Thorne (Libertarian)[22]
  • Kelly Tshibaka (Republican)[22]
Arizona Mark Kelly Democratic 2020 (special) Incumbent running
Arkansas John Boozman Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
California Alex Padilla Democratic 2021 (appointed) Interim appointee nominated
Colorado Michael Bennet Democratic 2009 (appointed)
2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Connecticut Richard Blumenthal Democratic 2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Florida Marco Rubio Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent running
Georgia Raphael Warnock Democratic 2021 (special) Incumbent renominated
Hawaii Brian Schatz Democratic 2012 (appointed)
2014 (special)
2016
Incumbent running
Idaho Mike Crapo Republican 1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Illinois Tammy Duckworth Democratic 2016 Incumbent renominated
Indiana Todd Young Republican 2016 Incumbent renominated
Iowa Chuck Grassley Republican 1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Kansas Jerry Moran Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent running
Kentucky Rand Paul Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Louisiana John Kennedy Republican 2016 Incumbent running
Maryland Chris Van Hollen Democratic 2016 Incumbent running
  • Chris Chaffee (Republican)[40]
  • George Davis (Republican)[40]
  • Nnabu Eze (Republican)[40]
  • Lorie Friend (Republican)[40]
  • Reba Hawkins (Republican)[40]
  • Jon McGreevey (Republican)[40]
  • Joseph Perez (Republican)[40]
  • Todd Puglisi (Republican)[40]
  • Michelle Smith (Democratic)[40]
  • James Tarantin (Republican)[40]
  • John Thormann (Republican)[40]
  • Chris Van Hollen (Democratic)[40]
Missouri Roy Blunt Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent retiring[41]
Nevada Catherine Cortez Masto Democratic 2016 Incumbent renominated
New Hampshire Maggie Hassan Democratic 2016 Incumbent running
New York Chuck Schumer Democratic 1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
North Carolina Richard Burr Republican 2004
2010
2016
Incumbent retiring[47]
North Dakota John Hoeven Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Ohio Rob Portman Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent retiring[52]
Oklahoma James Lankford Republican 2014 (special)
2016
Incumbent renominated
Oregon Ron Wyden Democratic 1996 (special)
1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Pennsylvania Pat Toomey Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent retiring[57]
South Carolina Tim Scott Republican 2013 (appointed)
2014 (special)
2016
Incumbent renominated
South Dakota John Thune Republican 2004
2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Utah Mike Lee Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent renominated
Vermont Patrick Leahy Democratic 1974
1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent retiring[10]
Washington Patty Murray Democratic 1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent running
  • Thor Amundson (Independent)[66]
  • Jon Butler (Independent)[66]
  • Pano Churchill (Democratic)[66]
  • Sam Cusmir (Democratic)[66]
  • Henry Dennison (Socialist Workers)[66]
  • Dan Doan (Independent)[66]
  • John Guenther (Republican)[66]
  • Martin Hash (Independent)[66]
  • Bill Hirt (Republican)[66]
  • Chuck Jackson (Independent)[66]
  • Leon Lawson (Republican)[66]
  • Patty Murray (Democratic)[66]
  • Naz Paul (Independent)[66]
  • Ravin Pierre (Democratic)[66]
  • Mohammad Said (Democratic)[66]
  • Dave Saulibio (Republican)[66]
  • Tiffany Smiley (Republican)[66]
  • Bryan Solstin (Democratic)[66]
Wisconsin Ron Johnson Republican 2010
2016
Incumbent running

Alabama

Alabama election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Katie Britt AL 2021 (alt crop).jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee Katie Britt Will Boyd
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Richard Shelby
Republican



Six-term Republican Richard Shelby was re-elected in 2016 with 64% of the vote. On February 8, 2021, Shelby announced that he would not seek re-election to a seventh term.[68]

Katie Britt, Shelby's former Chief of Staff,[69] defeated six-term representative Mo Brooks in the runoff Republican primary election. Britt and Brooks defeated businesswoman Karla DuPriest, former Army pilot and author Michael Durant and author Jake Schafer in the initial primary election.[70]

Perennial candidate Will Boyd[71] defeated former Brighton mayor Brandaun Dean[72] and Lanny Jackson[73][74] in the Democratic primary.

Alaska

Three-term Republican Lisa Murkowski was re-elected in 2016 with 44.4% of the vote. Alaska adopted a top-four jungle primary system in 2020, with the ultimate winner being decided via ranked-choice voting. Characterizations of the state as a "Safe" or "Solid" Republican stronghold may change if Murkowski decides to change her party affiliation to Independent as she suggested after the Capitol Attack. If she does so, she would most likely continue to caucus with Republicans in the Senate.[75] On March 30, former Alaska Department of Administration Commissioner Kelly Tshibaka announced that she was running against Murkowski following the state's GOP decision to censure her, with Tshibaka later receiving former President Donald Trump's endorsement.[76] Orthopedic surgeon, commercial fisherman, and 2020 senate nominee Al Gross has expressed interest in running.[77]

Republican Governor Mike Dunleavy has announced that he will not run, opting to run for re-election.[78]

Arizona

Incumbent Democrat Mark Kelly took office on December 2, 2020, after winning a special election with 51.2% of the vote.

Six-term senator and 2008 Republican presidential nominee John McCain was re-elected to this seat in 2016. However, he died on August 25, 2018, and former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl was appointed to replace him. Kyl resigned at the end of 2018 and was succeeded by outgoing U.S. Representative Martha McSally, who lost the 2020 special election to complete the term.

Term-limited Republican governor Doug Ducey has announced that he will not challenge Kelly in 2022.[79] Republicans Blake Masters, the chairman of the Thiel foundation, Jim Lamon, chair of the solar power company Depcom,[80] and Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich have announced their candidacies against Kelly.[81]

Arkansas

Arkansas election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Senator John Boozman Official Portrait (115th Congress) (cropped).jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee John Boozman Natalie James
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

John Boozman
Republican



Two-term Republican John Boozman was re-elected in 2016 with 59.8% of the vote. Boozman has announced that he is running for a third term.[82]

Boozman defeated former NFL player and U.S. Army veteran Jake Bequette, gun range owner and 2018 gubernatorial candidate Jan Morgan, and pastor Heath Loftis in the Republican primary.[83][84][85][86] A fourth challenger, corporate analyst Michael Deel withdrew prior to the primary election citing a lack of viability.[87]

Natalie James, a real estate broker from Little Rock,[88] defeated Dan Whitfield, who attempted to run as an independent for Arkansas' other U.S. Senate seat in 2020 but failed to meet the ballot access requirements,[89] and former Pine Bluff city alderman Jack Foster for the Democratic nomination.[90]

California

California election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Alex Padilla 117th Congress portrait.jpg
3x4.svg
Candidate Alex Padilla Mark Meuser
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. senator

Alex Padilla
Democratic



Incumbent Democrat Alex Padilla took office on January 20, 2021. He was appointed by Governor Gavin Newsom following the resignation of incumbent Democrat Kamala Harris on January 18, 2021 in advance of her swearing-in as Vice President of the United States.[91]

Due to a rule change, there will be two ballot items for the same seat: a general election, to elect a Class 3 Senator to a full term beginning with the 118th United States Congress, sworn in on January 3, 2023, and a special election, to fill that seat for the final weeks of the 117th Congress. Padilla is running to fill the seat for the remainder of the current term, and for election to a full term.[1]

Colorado

Colorado election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Michael Bennet by Gage Skidmore.jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee Michael Bennet Joe O'Dea
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. senator

Michael Bennet
Democratic



Two-term Democrat Michael Bennet took office on January 21, 2009, after being appointed by then governor Bill Ritter to replace outgoing Democrat Ken Salazar, who was nominated by President Barack Obama to serve as United States Secretary of the Interior. He has narrowly won reelection bids, in 2010 to his first full term, with 48.08% of the vote, and, in 2016 to his second, with 49.97% of the vote.

In the Republican primary, businessman Joe O'Dea defeated state representative Ron Hanks.[92][93]

Connecticut

Two-term Democrat Richard Blumenthal was re-elected in 2016 with 63.2% of the vote.

Former state House Minority Leader Themis Klarides is running for the Republican nomination.[94]

Florida

Two-term Republican Marco Rubio was re-elected in 2016 with 52% of the vote. He announced on November 9, 2020, via Facebook, that he is running for re-election.[95]

U.S. Representative Val Demings and former U.S. Representative Alan Grayson are running for the Democratic nomination.[96][97]

Former U.S. Representative David Jolly, who was previously a Republican but is now independent, is considering running.[98]

Ivanka Trump, daughter and former Senior Advisor to former President Donald Trump, was seen as a potential candidate to challenge Rubio for the Republican nomination.[99] However, on February 18, 2021, it was confirmed that she would not seek the nomination.[100]

Georgia

Incumbent Democrat Raphael Warnock won the 2020–2021 special election against incumbent Republican Kelly Loeffler to fill the remainder of former Sen. Johnny Isakson's term. (Isakson had resigned at the end of 2019, and Loeffler was appointed by Governor Brian Kemp following Isakson's resignation.) No candidate in the open election on November 3 received the 50% required by Georgia law to avoid a run-off, a type of election colloquially known as a "jungle primary"[101]—Warnock received just 32.9% of the vote—and so, a run-off election between Warnock and Loeffler was held on January 5, 2021, which Warnock won with 51% of the vote.

Former Republican senator David Perdue, who narrowly lost his race to Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff in 2021,[102] and Former U.S. Representative Doug Collins[103] both considered challenging Warnock, but each eventually announced he is not running.[104]

Former NFL player, Georgia native, and Heisman Trophy-winning University of Georgia running back Herschel Walker,[105] who has been endorsed by former President Donald Trump,[106] defeated banking executive Latham Saddler[107] and others in the Republican primary.

Hawaii

One-term Democrat Brian Schatz was appointed to the Senate in 2012, following the death of incumbent Daniel Inouye. He won a special election to finish Inouye's term in 2014, and won his first full term in 2016 with 73.6% of the vote. Republican state representative Bob McDermott is challenging Schatz.[108]

Idaho

Idaho election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Mike Crapo 2019 (looser crop).jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee Mike Crapo David Roth
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Mike Crapo
Republican



Four-term Republican Mike Crapo was re-elected in 2016 with 66.1% of the vote. He is running for re-election to a fifth term.[109] Democrat David Roth will face Crapo in the general election after defeating Ben Pursley in the primary.[110]

Illinois

Illinois election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Tammy Duckworth 115th official portrait (cropped).jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee Tammy Duckworth Kathy Salvi
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. senator

Tammy Duckworth
Democratic



One-term Democrat Tammy Duckworth was elected in 2016 with 54.9% of the vote. She will face Republican nominee Kathy Salvi in the general election.[111]

Indiana

One-term Republican Todd Young was elected in 2016 with 52.1% of the vote. He announced on March 2, 2021, that he is running for re-election.[112] Democratic Hammond Mayor Thomas McDermott, Jr., has announced that he is running.[113] James Sceniak, behavior therapist, is the Libertarian candidate running.

Iowa

Seven-term Republican Chuck Grassley was re-elected in 2016 with 60.1% of the vote. He is seeking re-election to an eighth term.[114]

State Senator Jim Carlin was defeated in the Republican primary by Grassley.[115]

Retired Admiral and former aide to U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy, Michael T. Franken,[116] defeated former U.S. Representative Abby Finkenauer in the Democratic primary.[117]

Kansas

Two-term Republican Jerry Moran was re-elected in 2016 with 62.2% of the vote. He has announced that he will be seeking re-election.[118] Democratic United Methodist pastor and former Kansas City mayor Mark Holland is challenging Moran.[119]

Kentucky

Kentucky election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Rand Paul, official portrait, 112th Congress alternate (cropped).jpg
Charles solar panels (cropped).jpg
Nominee Rand Paul Charles Booker
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Rand Paul
Republican



Two-term Republican Rand Paul was re-elected in 2016 with 57.3% of the vote. He is running for re-election to a third term.[120]

Former Democratic state representative and 2020 runner-up in the Democratic U.S. Senate primary Charles Booker won the Democratic primary.[121]

Louisiana

One-term Republican John Kennedy was elected in 2016 with 60.6% of the vote and has announced his intention to run for a second term.[38] Civil rights activist Gary Chambers and U.S. Navy veteran Luke Mixon are running as Democrats.[122][123]

Maryland

One-term Democrat Chris Van Hollen was elected in 2016 with 60.9% of the vote, and is running for a second term.[124]

Despite previously indicating that he had no interest in pursuing the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate, incumbent Governor Larry Hogan, who is term-limited and will leave office in 2023, told conservative talk radio host Hugh Hewitt in October 2021 that he was considering challenging Van Hollen. Hogan ultimately decided not to challenge Van Hollen on February 8, 2022.[125][126][127]

Missouri

Two-term Republican Roy Blunt was re-elected in 2016 with 49.2% of the vote. He is not seeking re-election.[12]

Former Governor of Missouri Eric Greitens,[128] Attorney General Eric Schmitt, and US Representatives Vicky Hartzler[129] and Billy Long[130] are running for the Republican nomination to succeed Blunt.

Though subject to speculation, US Representative Ann Wagner will not be running for the open Senate seat, opting to run for re-election.[131]

Marine veteran Lucas Kunce[132] and Anheuser-Busch heir Trudy Busch Valentine[133] are running in the Democratic primary.

Nevada

One-term Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto was elected in 2016 with 47.1% of the vote. She is seeking re-election.[134]

Former Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt is running against Cortez Masto for the seat once held by his maternal grandfather Paul Laxalt.[135]

New Hampshire

One-term Democrat Maggie Hassan was elected in 2016 with 48% of the vote. She is running for re-election.[45]

Republicans Don Bolduc, Chuck Morse, Kevin Smith and Tejasinha Sivalingam[45] have declared their candidacies.

Governor Chris Sununu, who was re-elected in 2020 with 65.2% of the vote, will not be running.[136]

New York

New York election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Chuck Schumer official photo (cropped 2).jpg
Joe.pinion.nygop (cropped).jpg
Nominee Chuck Schumer Joe Pinion
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. senator

Chuck Schumer
Democratic



Four-term Democrat and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer was re-elected in 2016 with 70.6% of the vote. He is seeking re-election.[137] Schumer defeated human rights activist Khaled Salem in the primary.[138][139]

Newsmax TV host Joe Pinion is the Republican nominee.[140][139]

North Carolina

North Carolina election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Ted Budd official portrait, 115th Congress (alt crop).jpg
Cheri Beasley HBCU The Road To Justice Tour 2.png
Nominee Ted Budd Cheri Beasley
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Richard Burr
Republican



Three-term Republican Richard Burr was re-elected in 2016 with 51.0% of the vote. Burr has pledged to retire in 2022.[13]

Veteran and senior fellow at the Center for International Policy, Mathew Hoh is running for senate with the Green Party.[48]

U.S. Representative Ted Budd, who was endorsed by former President Donald Trump, defeated former North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory in the Republican primary.[141][142][143]

Lara Trump, daughter-in-law of former President Donald Trump and North Carolina Lieutenant Governor Mark Robinson considered running for U.S. Senate, but ultimately decided not to run.[144][145][143][146]

Former Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court Cheri Beasley[147] defeated Beaufort mayor Rett Newton[148] in the Democratic primary.[149]

North Dakota

North Dakota election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Hoeven Official Portrait 2014.JPG
3x4.svg
Nominee John Hoeven Katrina Christiansen
Party Republican Democratic-NPL

Incumbent U.S. senator

John Hoeven
Republican



Two-term Republican John Hoeven was re-elected in 2016 with 78.5% of the vote. On February 4, 2021, Hoeven campaign spokesman Dan Larson has indicated Hoeven is running for re-election in 2022.[150][151] University of Jamestown engineering professor Katrina Christiansen defeated businessman Michael Steele in the Democratic primary election.[152] Former state representative Rick Becker challenged Hoeven in the Republican primary but withdrew after losing the convention.[153]

Hoeven and Christiansen won their respective primaries on June 14.[154]

Ohio

Ohio election

← 2016
2028 →
 
J. D. Vance by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Tim Ryan (48639153698) (cropped).jpg
Nominee J. D. Vance Tim Ryan
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Rob Portman
Republican



Two-term Republican Rob Portman was re-elected in 2016 with 58% of the vote. On January 25, 2021, he announced that he would not be running for re-election.[52]

Venture capitalist and author J. D. Vance was nominated in a crowded and competitive Republican primary, defeating USMCR veteran and former Ohio State Treasurer Josh Mandel, state senator Matt Dolan, investment banker Mike Gibbons, and former Ohio Republican Party chair Jane Timken, among others.[155] Vance was endorsed by former President Donald Trump in the primary.[156]

U.S. Representative and 2020 presidential candidate Tim Ryan is the Democratic nominee.

Oklahoma

There will be two elections in Oklahoma, due to the pending resignation of Jim Inhofe.

Oklahoma (regular)

One-term Republican James Lankford won the 2014 special election to serve the remainder of former senator Tom Coburn's term.[157] Lankford won election to his first full term in 2016 with 67.7% of the vote. He announced that he would be running for re-election on April 6, 2021.[158][159]

Jackson Lahmeyer, pastor for Sheridan Church and former Oklahoma State Coordinator for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, challenged Lankford in the Republican primary.[160]

Oklahoma (special)

Five-term incumbent Republican Jim Inhofe had been re-elected with 63% of the vote in 2020, and was not scheduled to be up for election again until 2026. However, Inhofe announced his intention to resign at the end of the 117th Congress. A special election to fill his seat will take place in November 2022, concurrent with the other Senate elections.[15] U.S. Representative Markwayne Mullin, and former Oklahoma House Speaker T. W. Shannon are competing in the runoff Republican primary election. Mullin and Shannon defeated Inhofe's chief of staff Luke Holland and others in the initial Republican primary election.[161][162][163] Additionally, former U.S. Representative Kendra Horn is the Democratic nominee, being her party's only candidate.[18][164]

Oregon

Oregon election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Ron Wyden 117th Congress 3x4.jpeg
Jo Rae Perkins senate forum 2014 (cropped).png
Nominee Ron Wyden Jo Rae Perkins
Party Democratic Republican

Incumbent U.S. senator

Ron Wyden
Democratic



Four-term Democrat Ron Wyden was re-elected in 2016 with 56.6% of the vote. He is seeking re-election.[56]

Republican Jo Rae Perkins, a perennial candidate and the 2020 nominee for U.S. Senate, won the Republican primary.[165]

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Dr. Mehmet Oz, August 2016.jpg
Lt. Gov. John Fetterman Portrait (46874790005) (cropped).jpg
Nominee Mehmet Oz John Fetterman
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Pat Toomey
Republican



Two-term Republican Pat Toomey was re-elected in 2016 with 48.8% of the vote. On October 5, 2020, Toomey announced that he will retire at the end of his term.[16]

Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman[166] defeated state representative Malcolm Kenyatta and U.S. Representative Conor Lamb in the Democratic primary.[167]

Mehmet Oz, host of The Dr. Oz Show and cardiothoracic surgeon[168] defeated 2018 U.S. Senate candidate Jeff Bartos,[169] 2018 candidate for Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district Sean Gale,[170] political commentator Kathy Barnette,[171] former U.S. Ambassador to Denmark Carla Sands,[172] and business executive David McCormick in the Republican primary.

South Carolina

South Carolina election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Tim Scott, official portrait, 113th Congress (cropped).jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee Tim Scott Krystle Matthews
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Tim Scott
Republican



One-term Republican Tim Scott was appointed in 2013 and won election to his first full term in 2016 with 60.6% of the vote. He said that while he is running for re-election in 2022, it would be his last time.[173] In the Democratic primary, State Representative Krystle Matthews defeated author and activist Catherine Fleming Bruce in a runoff.[174] Angela Geter, chairwoman of the Spartanburg County Democratic Party, also ran in the primary.[175][176][177]

South Dakota

South Dakota election

← 2016
2028 →
 
John Thune 117th Congress portrait cropped.jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee John Thune Brian Bengs
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

John Thune
Republican



Three-term Republican and Senate Minority Whip John Thune was re-elected in 2016 with 71.8% of the vote and is running for reelection to a fourth term.[178] Thune has been subject to some backlash from former President Trump and his supporters in the state of South Dakota, leading to speculation of a potential primary challenge.[179] He defeated Bruce Whalen, an Oglala Sioux tribal administrator and former chair of the Oglala Lakota County Republican Party in the Republican primary.[180]

The Democratic candidate is author and navy veteran Brian Bengs, who won the Democratic primary unopposed.[181]

Utah

Utah election

← 2016
2028 →
 
Mike Lee (50544016376) (cropped).jpg
Evan McMullin October 2019.png
Nominee Mike Lee Evan McMullin
Party Republican Independent

Incumbent U.S. senator

Mike Lee
Republican



Two-term Republican Mike Lee was re-elected in 2016 with 68.2% of the vote. He defeated former state representative Becky Edwards as well as businessman and political advisor Ally Isom in the Republican primary.[182]

The Utah Democratic Party has declined to field their own candidate against Lee, and has instead endorsed independent Evan McMullin, a political activist, former Republican, former CIA operations officer, and 2016 presidential candidate.[183]

Vermont

The most senior senator, eight-term Democrat and president pro tempore Patrick Leahy, was re-elected in 2016 with 61.3% of the vote. On November 15, 2021, Leahy announced that he is not seeking re-election to a ninth term.[10]

Vermont's at-large representative, Democrat Peter Welch, is running to succeed Leahy.[65]

Additionally, former United States Attorney for the District of Vermont Christina Nolan is running for the Republican nomination.[65]

Washington

Five-term Democrat Patty Murray was re-elected in 2016 with 58.8% of the vote. She is running for re-election to a sixth term.[184]

Republican nurse Tiffany Smiley is running.[185]

Wisconsin

Two-term Republican Ron Johnson was re-elected in 2016 with 50.2% of the vote. He is running for reelection to a third term.[186]

Former Governor Scott Walker has said that he will not run.[187]

Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson,[188] Senior Vice President of the Milwaukee Bucks Alex Lasry,[189] State Treasurer Sarah Godlewski,[190] and Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes[191] are running in the primary for the Democratic nomination.

Notes

  1. ^ a b The two independent senators, Bernie Sanders and Angus King, have caucused with the Democratic Party since joining the Senate, thus increasing the size of the Democratic caucus in the 117th United States Congress to 50.
  2. ^ The Democrats lead the Senate, since Democratic Vice President Kamala Harris has the ability to break ties.
  3. ^ The last elections for this group of senators were in 2016, except for those elected in a special election or who were appointed after the resignation or passing of a sitting senator, as noted.
  4. ^ FiveThirtyEight has three separate models for their House and Senate ratings: Lite (polling data only), Classic (polls, fundraising, and past voting patterns), and Deluxe (Classic alongside experts' ratings). This table uses the Deluxe model.
  5. ^ Category ranges:
    • Tossup: <60% both candidates
    • Lean: ≥60%
    • Likely: ≥75%
    • Solid: ≥95%
  6. ^ Republican John McCain won with 53.7% of the vote in 2016 but died on August 25, 2018.
  7. ^ Both regular and special elections.
  8. ^ Democrat Kamala Harris won with 61.6% of the vote against another Democrat in 2016, but resigned on January 18, 2021, to become Vice President of the United States.
  9. ^ Republican Johnny Isakson won with 54.8% of the vote in 2016, but resigned on December 31, 2019.
  10. ^ Democratic total includes two independents who caucus with the Democrats
  11. ^ Major candidates include those who have previously held office and/or those who are the subject of media attention.
  12. ^ Those who have filed paperwork but have not declared their candidacy are not listed here.

References

  1. ^ a b Wilson, Reid (September 28, 2021). "California rule change means Padilla faces extra election". The Hill. Archived from the original on September 28, 2021. Retrieved September 28, 2021.
  2. ^ Coleman, Miles (December 15, 2017). "2016 State PVI Changes – Decision Desk HQ". Decision Desk HQ. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018. Retrieved July 27, 2019.
  3. ^ "2022 Senate Race Ratings". Cook Political Report. January 14, 2021.
  4. ^ "Senate Ratings". Inside Elections. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  5. ^ "2022 Senate". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  6. ^ "2022 Election Forecast". Politico. Retrieved April 19, 2022.
  7. ^ "Battle for the Senate 2022". RCP. January 10, 2022.
  8. ^ "2022 Election Forecast". Fox News. May 12, 2022. Retrieved May 12, 2022.
  9. ^ "2022 Election Forecast". FiveThirtyEight. June 30, 2022. Retrieved June 30, 2022.
  10. ^ a b c Manchester, Julia (November 15, 2021). "Sen. Patrick Leahy says he won't seek reelection". The Hill. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  11. ^ Hulse, Carl (February 8, 2021). "Shelby, Veteran Senator from Alabama, Won't Seek Seventh Term". The New York Times. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  12. ^ a b Conradis, Brandon (March 8, 2021). "Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022". The Hill. Retrieved March 8, 2021.
  13. ^ a b Campbell, Colin (July 20, 2016). "US Sen. Richard Burr says 2016 will be his last run for elected office". The Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on November 11, 2016. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  14. ^ Sparling, Jason Williams, Scott Wartman, and Hannah K. "Portman: 'It's a tough time to be in public service.' Ohio Senator won't seek re-election". The Enquirer. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  15. ^ a b c Martin, Jonathan (February 24, 2022). "James Inhofe, Oklahoma Senator, Is Said to Plan an Early Retirement". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 25, 2022.
  16. ^ a b Tamari, Jonathan; Seidman, Andrew; Walsh, Sean Collins; Brennan, Chris (October 5, 2020). "Pat Toomey just made the 2022 elections in Pennsylvania a total free-for-all". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on October 10, 2020.
  17. ^ a b c d "CERTIFIED LIST OF CANDIDATES FOR THE JUNE 7, 2022, PRIMARY ELECTION" (PDF). Retrieved March 31, 2022.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "OK Candidate Filing". Oklahoma State Election Board. Retrieved April 15, 2022.
  19. ^ Carney, Jordain (February 8, 2021). "Shelby won't run for reelection". The Hill. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  20. ^ a b "2022 Election Information". Alabama Secretary of State. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  21. ^ "Certified List of Candidates for November 2022 General Election Ballot" (PDF). Alabama Secretary of State. Retrieved May 26, 2022.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "2022 Primary Candidate List". Alaska Division of Elections. Retrieved June 1, 2022.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g "2022 Primary Election". Arizona Secretary of State. Retrieved April 5, 2022.
  24. ^ a b c d "Candidate Information". Arkansas Secretary of State. Retrieved February 22, 2022.
  25. ^ a b "2022 Official Primary Election Candidate List". Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved May 5, 2022.
  26. ^ a b c d "2022 Certificates of Party Endorsement & Primary Eligibility Forms". Connecticut Secretary of State. Retrieved June 5, 2022.
  27. ^ Swan, Will Sommer,Betsy (January 15, 2020). "Meet the Trump Donor Who Allegedly Stalked America's Ambassador in Ukraine". The Daily Beast. Retrieved January 5, 2021.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h "Candidate Listing for 2022 General Election". Florida Department of State. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  29. ^ a b c "QUALIFYING CANDIDATE INFORMATION". Georgia Secretary of State. Retrieved March 11, 2022.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "2022 Candidate Filing Report". State of Hawaii Office of Elections. Retrieved June 7, 2022.
  31. ^ a b c d e "Report of Candidates Filed" (PDF). Idaho Secretary of State. Retrieved March 11, 2022.
  32. ^ a b "Candidates Filed". Illinois Secretary of State. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  33. ^ a b c "Indiana 2022 Candidates". Indiana Secretary of State. May 14, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  34. ^ a b "Primary Election". Iowa Secretary of State. Retrieved March 18, 2022.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Candidates for the 2022 Primary". Kansas Secretary of State. Retrieved June 1, 2022.
  36. ^ a b "Candidate Filings with the Office of the Secretary of State". web.sos.ky.gov. Retrieved January 25, 2022.
  37. ^ Bridges, Tyler (January 11, 2022). "Gary Chambers Jr. says he will challenge John Kennedy in U.S. Senate election campaign". nola.com. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  38. ^ a b Steinhauser, Paul (June 1, 2021). "Sen. John Kennedy launches 2022 re-election bid: 'I will not let you down. I'd rather drink weed killer.'". Fox News. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  39. ^ Englander, Tyler (October 6, 2021). "A conversation with U.S. Senate Candidate Luke Mixon". wafb.com. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "2022 Gubernatorial Primary Election State Candidates List". Maryland Secretary of State. Retrieved April 15, 2022.
  41. ^ Pecorin, Allison; Turner, Trish; Karson, Kendall (March 8, 2021). "Senior Senate Republican Roy Blunt announces he won't seek reelection". ABC News. Retrieved March 8, 2021.
  42. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah "UNOFFICIAL Candidate Filing - 2022 Primary Election". Missouri Secretary of State. Retrieved February 22, 2022.
  43. ^ Murray, Sara; Rogers, Alex (June 29, 2022). "John Wood, former January 6 committee investigator, launches independent Senate bid in Missouri". CNN. Retrieved June 29, 2022.
  44. ^ a b c d e f "2022 Election Information". Nevada Secretary of State. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "2022 Election Information". New Hampshire Department of State. Retrieved June 10, 2022.
  46. ^ a b c d "Certification for the June 28, 2022 Primary Election" (PDF). New York State Board of Elections. May 4, 2022. Retrieved May 19, 2022.
  47. ^ Colin Campbell (July 20, 2016). "US Sen. Richard Burr says 2016 will be his last run for elected office". The Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on September 13, 2018. Retrieved September 27, 2018.
  48. ^ a b "Matthew Hoh". Ballotpedia.
  49. ^ a b c "Candidate Lists". February 24, 2022.
  50. ^ a b "Here are the candidates running for U.S. Senate in North Carolina in 2022". WFAE. May 1, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  51. ^ a b "Candidate List Results". North Dakota Secretary of State. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  52. ^ a b Williams, Jason. "Ohio's U.S. Sen. Rob Portman won't run for re-election; Republican cites 'partisan gridlock'". The Enquirer. Retrieved January 25, 2021.
  53. ^ "FEC FORM 2 - STATEMENT OF CANDIDACY" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. February 18, 2021. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  54. ^ "FEC FORM 2 - STATEMENT OF CANDIDACY" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. June 3, 2021. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  55. ^ a b Nichols, Rob. "FILINGS FOR THE 2022 PRIMARY ELECTION RELEASED". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved February 3, 2022.
  56. ^ a b c "Candidates for 2022 Primary Election". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  57. ^ Tamari, Jonathan; Bender, William (October 4, 2020). "Sen. Pat Toomey won't run for reelection or for Pennsylvania governor, sources say". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  58. ^ a b c d "John Fetterman wins Pennsylvania Democratic Senate primary". WTXF-TV. Philadelphia. May 17, 2022. Retrieved May 20, 2022.
  59. ^ Ulrich, Steve (June 15, 2022). "Suffolk Poll: Fetterman Leads Oz". PoliticsPA. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  60. ^ "Here's everything you need to know to vote in Pennsylvania". Fox 43. May 6, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  61. ^ Gabriel, Trip (June 3, 2022). "David McCormick Concedes to Dr. Oz in the G.O.P. Primary for Senate in Pennsylvania". The New York Times. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  62. ^ a b "11/8/2022 Statewide General Election". South Carolina Election Commission. Retrieved March 18, 2022.
  63. ^ a b "2022 Primary Election". South Dakota Secretary of State. Retrieved March 22, 2022.
  64. ^ a b c d "2022 Candidate Filings". Office of the Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  65. ^ a b c d e f g h i "2022 Primary Candidate Listing". Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  66. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "PRIMARY 2022". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved May 20, 2022.
  67. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Candidate Tracking by Office". Wisconsin Elections Commission. Retrieved June 1, 2022.
  68. ^ Hulse, Carl (February 8, 2021). "Shelby, Veteran Senator from Alabama, Won't Seek Seventh Term". The New York Times. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  69. ^ Walker, Charlie (June 8, 2021). "Katie Britt announces U.S. Senate candidacy". Alabama Political Reporter.
  70. ^ Blankenship, Robert (January 25, 2022). "Qualifying for 2022 election ends Friday, Jan. 28". The Andalusia Star News. Retrieved January 27, 2022.
  71. ^ Burkhalter, Eddie (January 31, 2022). "Will Boyd announces U.S. Senate run". Alabama Political Reporter. Retrieved February 2, 2022.
  72. ^ Moseley, Brandon (January 31, 2022). "Democratic Senate candidate says that he will be the "most anti-poverty and pro Black candidate"". 1819 News. Retrieved February 2, 2022.
  73. ^ Cason, Mike (January 28, 2022). "Alabama Republican candidates far outnumber Democrats as qualifying for May 24 primary wraps up". AL.com. Retrieved February 2, 2022.
  74. ^ Gattis, Paul (March 4, 2022). "Alabama Democrats remove Trump-supporter from primary ballot". AL.com. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  75. ^ Liz Ruskin [@lruskin] (January 9, 2021). "Lotta speculation about @lisamurkowski going Democrat. I asked: Are you considering joining the Democratic majority? Murkowski: "No. No. Absolutely, unequivocally not."" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  76. ^ Rogers, Alex (March 30, 2021). "Republican Kelly Tshibaka launches Senate campaign against Lisa Murkowski". CNN. Retrieved March 31, 2021.
  77. ^ Jacob Rubashkin (April 12, 2021). "Alaska Senate: Al Gross, 2020 Nominee, Considering Another Run". Inside Elections. Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  78. ^ Brooks, James (August 13, 2021). "Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy will run for re-election in 2022". Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved August 14, 2021.
  79. ^ Axelrod, Tal (January 23, 2021). "Arizona Gov. Ducey says he won't run against Mark Kelly for Senate". The Hill. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  80. ^ Sanchez, Yvonne. "Jim Lamon is the 1st Republican to enter Arizona's 2022 Senate race". azcentral. Retrieved May 3, 2021.
  81. ^ Wingett Sanchez, Yvonne (June 10, 2021). "Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich launches US Senate campaign". Arizona Central.
  82. ^ "Senator Boozman seeks re-election in 2022". Southwest Times Record. March 15, 2021. Retrieved March 17, 2021.
  83. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (July 12, 2021). "Former NFL player, Iraq war veteran Jake Bequette challenges Arkansas Sen. Boozman". Fox News. Retrieved July 12, 2021.
  84. ^ Lockwood, Frank E. (March 17, 2021). "Former gubernatorial candidate Jan Morgan launches U.S. Senate bid". Arkansas Democrat Gazette. Retrieved March 18, 2021.
  85. ^ Brantley, Max (March 24, 2021). "Another challenger to John Boozman from the right". Arkansas Times. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  86. ^ "Sen. John Boozman clinches Republican nomination in Arkansas". PBS NewsHour. May 24, 2022. Retrieved June 30, 2022.
  87. ^ Bowden, Bill (May 9, 2021). "Gay Republican sets eye on U.S. Senate seat held by Boozman to 'make difference'". Arkansas Democrat Gazette. Retrieved May 15, 2021.
  88. ^ Schmidt, Haleigh (January 13, 2021). "Dan Whitfield to run against Boozman for US Senate seat in 2022". KFSM. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  89. ^ Gilker, Kathryn (October 1, 2020). "Dan Whitfield suspends US Senate race after not getting on the ballot". KFSM. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  90. ^ Bailey, Austin (April 9, 2021). "Arkansas Sen. John Boozman gets another challenger, this time from the left". Arkansas Times. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  91. ^ Hubler, Shawn (December 22, 2020). "Alex Padilla Will Replace Kamala Harris in the Senate". The New York Times.
  92. ^ Fish, Sandra; Paul, Jesse (October 2021). "Ron Hanks files to run for U.S. Senate in Colorado". The Colorado Sun. Retrieved October 1, 2021.
  93. ^ Luning, Ernest (May 11, 2022). "Former Colorado Gov. Bill Owens endorses Joe O'Dea in US Senate primary". Gazette.com.
  94. ^ House, Dennis (January 30, 2022). "This Week in CT: Themis Klarides announces run for U.S. Senate seat". Wtnh.com. Retrieved February 21, 2022.
  95. ^ "Marco Rubio 2022 US Senate". WinRed.
  96. ^ Greenwood, Max (June 9, 2021). "Florida Rep. Val Demings officially enters Senate race against Rubio". The Hill. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  97. ^ Ogles, Jacob (June 7, 2021). "'It's on': Alan Grayson slams 'corrupt' Marco Rubio, steps up Senate bid". Florida Politics. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  98. ^ "Former U.S. Rep. David Jolly hints at possible run for Governor or U.S. Senate". Florida Politics. July 27, 2020.
  99. ^ McGraw, Meredith; Caputo, Marc; Stein, Sam (January 15, 2021). "Ivanka's political future comes into sharper focus". Politico.
  100. ^ "Ivanka Trump passes up Senate bid against Rubio". Politico. February 18, 2021.
  101. ^ Keenan, Sean (March 20, 2020). "What in the world is a jungle primary, and what's in store for Georgia's?". Atlanta. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  102. ^ Bluestein, Greg (February 15, 2021). "Perdue explores Senate comeback bid against Warnock in 2022". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  103. ^ Arkin, James. "Doug Collins says he won't run for Georgia Senate, governor". Politico. Retrieved April 26, 2021.
  104. ^ Arkin, James (February 23, 2021). "Perdue rules out Georgia Senate comeback in 2022". Politico. Retrieved February 23, 2021.
  105. ^ Machlin, Tzvi (April 11, 2021). "Legendary NFL Running Back Considering U.S. Senate Run". College Spun. The Spun. Retrieved April 11, 2021.
  106. ^ Rogers, Alex; Raju, Manu (April 22, 2021). "With Trump's backing, Walker freezes Senate GOP field in Georgia". CNN. Retrieved April 22, 2021.
  107. ^ Bluestein, Greg (April 26, 2021). "Who would challenge Raphael Warnock in 2022". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved April 7, 2021.
  108. ^ "Republican state representative announces run against Schatz for US Senate". www.hawaiinewsnow.com. Hawaii News Now. January 18, 2022. Retrieved January 19, 2022.
  109. ^ https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article257061642.html[bare URL]
  110. ^ Press, Associated (May 18, 2022). "Roth wins Dem primary for Senate in Idaho". Local News 8. Retrieved June 30, 2022.
  111. ^ •. "Attorney Kathy Salvi Earns Republican Senate Nomination, to Face Tammy Duckworth". NBC Chicago. Retrieved June 30, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  112. ^ "'I'm running': Todd Young to seek re-election to US Senate". March 2, 2021. Retrieved March 2, 2021.
  113. ^ Lange, Kaitlin (August 18, 2021). "Hammond Mayor Thomas McDermott Jr. files to run for Sen. Todd Young's seat in 2022". The Indianapolis Star.
  114. ^ Everett, Burgess (September 24, 2021). "Grassley will seek reelection, boosting GOP's majority hopes". Politico. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  115. ^ Hall, Jacob (February 12, 2021). "BREAKING: State Sen. Jim Carlin is running for United States Senate seat currently held by Chuck Grassley, says if our votes do not count, we no longer have a representative government". The Iowa Standard. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  116. ^ Belin, Laura (February 20, 2020). "Chuck Grassley says grandson's "never expressed" interest in U.S. Senate bid". Bleeding Heartland. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  117. ^ Thrush, Glenn (July 22, 2021). "A young Democrat challenges Grassley for Iowa Senate seat, citing his failure to confront the Jan. 6 rioters". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 28, 2021.
  118. ^ "Sen. Jerry Moran will seek reelection in 2022, an aide said". KSHB 41 Kansas City. Associated Press. November 11, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  119. ^ Kaut, Steve (November 11, 2021). "Former KCK Mayor Mark Holland to run for US Senate seat in Kansas". KSHB. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  120. ^ Dean, Kelly (February 25, 2021). "Sen. Rand Paul discusses upcoming plans for re-election 2022". ABC News. Retrieved March 6, 2021.
  121. ^ "Charles Booker forms exploratory committee for U.S. Senate run". Politico. Associated Press. April 12, 2021. Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  122. ^ "Baton Rouge community activist Gary Chambers launches campaign for U.S. Senate". Wafb.com. January 11, 2022. Retrieved February 21, 2022.
  123. ^ Segura, Matthew. "Sen. John Kennedy draws a challenger: Navy veteran Luke Mixon". KNOE.
  124. ^ Kurtz, Josh (April 16, 2021). "Mizeur Collects $350K for Congressional Bid; Aruna Miller Raising Money for Possible House Run". Maryland Matters. Retrieved May 7, 2021.
  125. ^ Broadwater, Luke (July 7, 2020). "Hogan, Maryland Governor, Plans Book Tour as He Eyes 2024 White House Run". The New York Times.
  126. ^ Drucker, David M. (October 8, 2021). "Larry Hogan ponders Maryland Senate race". Yahoo. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  127. ^ "AP source: GOP Maryland Gov. Hogan won't run for Senate". WBAL. February 8, 2022. Retrieved February 8, 2022.
  128. ^ Willeke, Becky (June 10, 2020). "Former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens may be looking at running for office". KTVI. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  129. ^ Suntrup, Jack (June 10, 2021). "Vicky Hartzler, GOP congresswoman from western Missouri, running for U.S. Senate". STL Today. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  130. ^ Bowman, Bridget (August 3, 2021). "GOP Rep. Billy Long joins Missouri Senate race". Roll Call. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  131. ^ Schallhorn, Kaitlyn (August 3, 2021). "Ann Wagner running for re-election in Missouri's 2nd Congressional District". Missouri Times. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  132. ^ "Marine veteran Lucas Kunce launches Missouri Senate bid after Roy Blunt retirement". KMBC 9 News. Associated Press. March 10, 2021.
  133. ^ Erickson, Kurt (March 29, 2022). "St. Louis beer heiress joins race for U.S. Senate". The St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  134. ^ "Cortez Masto Launches 2022 Reelection Bid". The Nevada Independent. February 24, 2021. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  135. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (August 17, 2021). "Nevada Senate race: Laxalt launches Republican run in state that is a top GOP 2022 target". Fox News.
  136. ^ Gomez, Henry (November 9, 2021). "New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu says he will not run for Senate, a blow to GOP hopes". NBC News. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  137. ^ Bolton, Alexander (March 29, 2021). "Schumer kicks into reelection phone". The Hill.
  138. ^ "Egyptian-born Senate candidate urges Iran not to 'waste' chance for nuclear talks". Israel Hayon. February 7, 2021.
  139. ^ a b "New York U.S. Senate Primary Election Results". The New York Times. June 29, 2022. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 30, 2022.
  140. ^ Taddeo, Sarah (March 1, 2022). "Republican Joe Pinion secures GOP designation for historic bid against Schumer". Democrat and Chronicle.
  141. ^ Murphy, Brian; Théoden Janes (April 14, 2021). "Former North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory announces bid for US Senate seat in 2022". The Charlotte Observer.
  142. ^ Arkin, James (April 28, 2021). "Ted Budd launches Senate bid in North Carolina". Politico. Retrieved April 28, 2021.
  143. ^ a b Polus, Sarah (June 5, 2021). "Lara Trump on Senate bid: 'No for now, not no forever'". The Hill. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  144. ^ Karni, Annie (November 19, 2020). "Will Lara Trump Be the Next Trump on a Ballot?". The New York Times. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  145. ^ Choi, Matthew; Isenstadt, Alex; Arkin, James (November 19, 2020). "Lara Trump considers run for Senate in North Carolina". Politico. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  146. ^ "NC Lt. Governor Mark Robinson Won't Run for Senate In 2022". WUNC. April 20, 2021. Retrieved April 20, 2021.
  147. ^ Axelrod, Tal (April 27, 2021). "Former North Carolina chief justice launches Senate campaign". The Hill. Retrieved April 27, 2021.
  148. ^ Murphey, Brian. "Rett Newton: Beaufort mayor joins NC's US Senate race". The News & Observer. Retrieved April 7, 2021.
  149. ^ Murphy, Brian. "Could Lara Trump run in NC in 2022? Open Senate seat expected to draw a GOP crowd". The News & Observer. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  150. ^ Wagner, Cordell (February 5, 2021). "Senator John Hoeven Seeking 3rd Term". Valley News Live.
  151. ^ Monk, Jim (February 4, 2021). "Hoeven to seek third term in Senate". KVRR.
  152. ^ Turley, Jeremy (February 14, 2022). "Two North Dakota Democrats enter US Senate race". inforum.com.
  153. ^ Turley, Jeremy (April 2, 2022). "Hoeven beats Becker for North Dakota GOP endorsement in Senate race". www.inforum.com. Retrieved April 3, 2022.
  154. ^ "2022 North Dakota primary results". Politico. June 14, 2022. Retrieved June 14, 2022.
  155. ^ Tal Axelrod (July 1, 2021). "JD Vance jumps into Ohio Senate primary". The Hill.
  156. ^ Eric McDaniel (April 15, 2022). "Trump endorses J.D. Vance, wading into Ohio's contentious Republican Senate primary". NPR.
  157. ^ "Federal, State, Legislative, and Judicial Races General Election — November 4, 2014". Oklahoma.gov. Oklahoma State Election Board. Archived from the original on April 8, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  158. ^ "Federal, State, Legislative, and Judicial Races General Election — November 8, 2016". Oklahoma.gov. Oklahoma State Election Board. Archived from the original on April 8, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  159. ^ Krehbiel, Randy (April 6, 2021). "Sen. Lankford says re-election bid will be about him being him". Tulsa World. Retrieved April 7, 2021.
  160. ^ Krehbiel, Randy (March 17, 2021). "Tulsa pastor challenges Lankford for Senate with boost from Trump loyalist Michael Flynnglish". Tulsa World. Retrieved March 19, 2021.
  161. ^ "Luke Holland, Sen. Inhofe's chief of staff, announces candidacy for US Senate". KOCO. February 25, 2022. Retrieved February 25, 2022.
  162. ^ Morris, Callie (February 26, 2022). "Rep. Markwayne Mullin announces run for Senate". KTUL News. Retrieved February 26, 2022.
  163. ^ Krehbiel, Randy (March 10, 2022). "After eight years, Shannon ready for one more race". Tulsa World. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  164. ^ Casteel, Chris (March 15, 2022). "Kendra Horn files for Jim Inhofe's Senate seat". The Oklahoman. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  165. ^ Day, Jim (November 13, 2020). "Perkins plans another run for Senate". Corvallis Gazette-Times. Archived from the original on December 16, 2020. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  166. ^ Otterbein, Holly (February 8, 2021). "John Fetterman launches Senate bid in Pennsylvania". Politico. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  167. ^ "Conor Lamb launching Senate bid in Pennsylvania". Politico. August 6, 2021. Retrieved August 6, 2021.
  168. ^ Tamari, Jonathan (November 30, 2021). "Dr. Oz officially joins the Senate race in Pennsylvania". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  169. ^ Tamari, Jonathan (March 8, 2021). "Real estate developer Jeff Bartos launches a Republican Senate campaign in Pennsylvania". Philadelphia Inquirer. The Philadelphia Inquirer, LLC. Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  170. ^ Brennan, Chris (February 16, 2021). "The Gale brothers of Montgomery County are teaming up to run for governor and U.S. Senate". Philadelphia Inquirer. The Philadelphia Inquirer, LLC. Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  171. ^ Cole, John (April 6, 2021). "Barnette, Former PA4 Nominee and Conservative Commentator, Announces 2022 U.S. Senate Bid". PoliticsPA. Retrieved April 7, 2021.
  172. ^ Owens, Dennis (July 13, 2021). "Cumberland Valley graduate, Carla Sands, hopes to become Pa.'s first woman U.S. Senator". Retrieved August 6, 2021.
  173. ^ Rachel Frazin (August 9, 2019). "GOP Sen. Tim Scott says if he runs in 2022 it will be his last race". The Hill.
  174. ^ Novelly, Thomas (April 12, 2021). "Lowcountry Democratic lawmaker announces challenge to Republican Sen. Tim Scott in 2022". Post and Courier. Retrieved April 13, 2021.
  175. ^ Conradis, Brandon (January 21, 2022). "These Senate seats are up for election in 2022". The Hill. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  176. ^ Kinnard, Meg (April 12, 2021). "Democrat says registration key to ousting SC's Tim Scott". Daily Herald. Associated Press. Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  177. ^ Montgomery, Bob (May 6, 2021). "Spartanburg's Dem chair announces bid for U.S. Senator Tim Scott's seat". GoUpstate. Retrieved May 6, 2021.
  178. ^ Levine, Marianne (January 8, 2022). "Senate Minority Whip John Thune to run for reelection". Politico. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  179. ^ Solender, Andrew (December 22, 2020). "Trump Adds Senate Leader John Thune To List Of Republicans He Wants Unseated". Forbes. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  180. ^ Austin Goss (July 27, 2021). "State Rep. Taffy Howard expected to announce bid for US Congress". KEVN.
  181. ^ randy.dockendorf@yankton.net, BY RANDY DOCKENDORF. "Democrat Bengs Seeks Major Upset In US Senate Race". Yankton Press & Dakotan. Retrieved June 30, 2022.
  182. ^ Schott, Bryan (February 9, 2021). "In fundraising appeal, Sen. Mike Lee claims the anti-Trump Lincoln Project is gunning for him next year". Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  183. ^ Forgey, Quint (October 5, 2021). "Evan McMullin announces Utah Senate bid". POLITICO. Archived from the original on October 5, 2021. Retrieved October 5, 2021.
  184. ^ "Senator Patty Murray announces reelection campaign". My Northwest. May 17, 2021.
  185. ^ "Republican Tiffany Smiley says she is running for US Senate". The Seattle Times. Associated Press. April 14, 2021.
  186. ^ Axelrod, Tal (January 9, 2022). "Ron Johnson announces run for third Senate term in Wisconsin". The Hill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  187. ^ Kelly Meyerhofer (July 18, 2019). "Scott Walker takes new job, says he won't run for office in 2022". Wisconsin State Journal. Archived from the original on July 16, 2019. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  188. ^ Gallup, Larry (October 22, 2020). "Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson files for 2022 Senate race". Appleton Post-Crescent.
  189. ^ Bauer, Scott (February 17, 2021). "Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry announces Senate run". Wisconsin State Journal. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  190. ^ Glauber, Bill (April 14, 2021). "Wisconsin Treasurer Sarah Godlewski join 2022 U.S. Senate race targeting Ron Johnson". Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  191. ^ Greenwood, Max (July 20, 2021). "Wisconsin Lt. Governor Mandela Barnes enters Senate race". The Hill. Retrieved July 20, 2021.
This page was last edited on 2 July 2022, at 03:23
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.