To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2019 Vuelta a España

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2019 Vuelta a España
2019 UCI World Tour, race 32 of 38
Podium in Madrid on 15 September 2019
Podium in Madrid on 15 September 2019
Race details
Dates24 August – 15 September
Stages21
Distance3,290.7 km (2,045 mi)
Winning time83h 07' 14"
Results
Winner  Primož Roglič (SLO) (Team Jumbo–Visma)
  Second  Alejandro Valverde (ESP) (Movistar Team)
  Third  Tadej Pogačar (SLO) (UAE Team Emirates)

Points  Primož Roglič (SLO) (Team Jumbo–Visma)
Mountains  Geoffrey Bouchard (FRA) (AG2R La Mondiale)
Youth  Tadej Pogačar (SLO) (UAE Team Emirates)
Combativity  Miguel Ángel López (COL) (Astana)
Team Movistar Team
← 2018
2020 →

The 2019 Vuelta a España was a three-week Grand Tour cycling stage race that took place in Spain, Andorra and France between 24 August and 15 September 2019.[1] The race was the 74th edition of the Vuelta a España and is the final Grand Tour of the 2019 cycling season. The race started with a team time trial in Torrevieja on the Costa Blanca.[2][3]

The race was won by Primož Roglič of Team Jumbo–Visma, making him the first Slovenian rider to win a Grand Tour. Rounding out the podium were Alejandro Valverde of Movistar Team in second and Roglič's countryman Tadej Pogačar of UAE Team Emirates in third.

Along with the overall, Roglič also took the points classification. Geoffrey Bouchard of AG2R La Mondiale won the mountains classification, while Pogačar was the best young rider. Miguel Ángel López of Astana was named the overall most combative, and Movistar Team won the team classification.

Teams

The 18 UCI WorldTeams are automatically invited to the race. In addition, four Professional Continental teams obtained a wildcard, bringing the number of teams to 22.[4]

The teams that entered the race were:

UCI WorldTeams

UCI Professional Continental teams

Pre-race favourites

The winner of the 2018 Vuelta a España, Simon Yates, had decided to not defend his title after riding in the 2019 Giro d'Italia and Tour de France. Steven Kruijswijk, Primož Roglič (Team Jumbo-Visma), Miguel Ángel López, Jakob Fuglsang (Astana) and Nairo Quintana (Movistar Team) were considered among the pre-race favourites. Fernando Gaviria (UAE Team Emirates) and Sam Bennett (Bora-Hansgrohe) were considered as potential stage winners and points classification contenders.[5][6] Kruijswijk climbed on the podium of the 2019 Tour de France, while his team partner Roglič got third at the 2019 Giro d'Italia. López was on the podium on both the 2018 Giro d'Italia and the 2018 Vuelta a España.

There were three previous winners among the participating cyclists: Alejandro Valverde (2009), Fabio Aru (2015) and Nairo Quintana (2016). Valverde (Movistar Team) and Thomas De Gendt (Lotto-Soudal) also attempted to defend their points and mountain classification titles.[citation needed]

Stages

List of stages[7][8]
Stage Date Course Distance Type[9] Winner
1 24 August Salinas de Torrevieja to Torrevieja 13.4 km (8.3 mi) Team time trial Astana
2 25 August Benidorm to Calpe 199.6 km (124.0 mi) Hilly stage  Nairo Quintana (COL)
3 26 August Ibi to Alicante 188 km (116.8 mi) Flat stage  Sam Bennett (IRL)
4 27 August Cullera to El Puig 175.5 km (109.1 mi) Flat stage  Fabio Jakobsen (NED)
5 28 August L'Eliana to Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre 170.7 km (106.1 mi) Hilly stage  Ángel Madrazo (ESP)
6 29 August Mora de Rubielos to Ares del Maestrat 198.9 km (123.6 mi) Hilly stage  Jesús Herrada (ESP)
7 30 August Onda to Mas de la Costa 183.2 km (113.8 mi) Mountain stage  Alejandro Valverde (ESP)
8 31 August Valls to Igualada 166.9 km (103.7 mi) Hilly stage  Nikias Arndt (GER)
9 1 September Andorra la Vella (Andorra) to Cortals d'Encamp (Andorra) 94.4 km (58.7 mi) Mountain stage  Tadej Pogačar (SLO)
2 September Andorra Rest day
10 3 September Jurançon (France) to Pau (France) 36.2 km (22.5 mi) Individual time trial  Primož Roglič (SLO)
11 4 September Saint-Palais (France) to Urdax 180 km (111.8 mi) Hilly stage  Mikel Iturria (ESP)
12 5 September Circuito de Navarra to Bilbao 171.4 km (106.5 mi) Hilly stage  Philippe Gilbert (BEL)
13 6 September Bilbao to Los Machucos 166.4 km (103.4 mi) Mountain stage  Tadej Pogačar (SLO)
14 7 September San Vicente de la Barquera to Oviedo 188 km (116.8 mi) Flat stage  Sam Bennett (IRL)
15 8 September Tineo to Santuario del Acebo 154.4 km (95.9 mi) Mountain stage  Sepp Kuss (USA)
16 9 September Pravia to La Cubilla [es] 144.4 km (89.7 mi) Mountain stage  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN)
10 September León Rest day
17 11 September Aranda de Duero to Guadalajara 219.6 km (136.5 mi) Flat stage  Philippe Gilbert (BEL)
18 12 September Colmenar Viejo to Becerril de la Sierra 177.5 km (110.3 mi) Mountain stage  Sergio Higuita (COL)
19 13 September Ávila to Toledo 165.2 km (102.7 mi) Flat stage  Rémi Cavagna (FRA)
20 14 September Arenas de San Pedro to Plataforma de Gredos [es] 190.4 km (118.3 mi) Mountain stage  Tadej Pogačar (SLO)
21 15 September Fuenlabrada to Madrid 106.6 km (66.2 mi) Flat stage  Fabio Jakobsen (NED)
Total 3,290.7 km (2,044.7 mi)

Classification leadership

The Vuelta a España has four individual classifications, for which jerseys were awarded daily to the leading rider, as well as a team competition. The primary classification is the general classification, which is calculated by adding each rider's finishing times on each stage. Time bonuses were awarded at the end of every stage apart from the team time trial (stage 1) and individual time trial (stage 10). The rider with the lowest cumulative time is the leader of the general classification, and wears the red jersey. The leader of the general classification at the end of the race is considered the overall winner of the Vuelta a España.[10]

The second classification is the points classification. Riders receive points for finishing among the highest placed in a stage finish, or in intermediate sprints during the stages. The points available for each stage finish are determined by the stage's type. The leader is identified by a green jersey.[10]

Mountains classification points
Category 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
Cima Alberto Fernández 20 15 10 6 4 2
Special-category 15 10 6 4 2
First-category 10 6 4 2 1
Second-category 5 3 1
Third-category 3 2 1

The next classification is the mountains classification. Points are awarded to the riders that reach the summit of the most difficult climbs first. The climbs are categorized, in order of increasing difficulty, third-, second-, and first- and special-category. The leader wears white jersey with blue polka dots.[10]

The final of the individual classifications is the young rider classification, which is calculated by adding each rider's finishing times on each stage for each rider born on or after 1 January 1994. The rider with the lowest cumulative time is the leader of the young rider classification, and wears the white jersey.[10]

There is also the team classification. After each stage, the times of the three highest finishers of each team are added together. The victory is awarded to the team with the lowest cumulative time at the end of the event.[10]

In addition, there is one individual award: the combativity award. This award is given after each stage (excluding the team time trial and individual time trial) to the rider "who displayed the most generous effort and best sporting spirit." The daily winner wears a green number bib the following stage. At the end of the Vuelta, a jury decides the top three riders for the “Most Combative Rider of La Vuelta”, with a public vote deciding the victor.[10]

Classification leadership by stage[11]
Stage Winner General classification

Jersey red.svg
Points classification

Jersey green.svg
Mountains classification
Jersey blue polkadot.svg
Young rider classification
Jersey white.svg
Team classification

Jersey red number.svg
Combativity award

Jersey yellow number.svg
1 Astana Miguel Ángel López not awarded not awarded Miguel Ángel López Astana Miguel Ángel López
2 Nairo Quintana Nicolas Roche Nairo Quintana Ángel Madrazo Team Sunweb Ángel Madrazo
3 Sam Bennett Ángel Madrazo
4 Fabio Jakobsen Sam Bennett Jorge Cubero
5 Ángel Madrazo Miguel Ángel López Movistar Team José Herrada
6 Jesús Herrada Dylan Teuns Jesús Herrada
7 Alejandro Valverde Miguel Ángel López Nairo Quintana Sergio Henao
8 Nikias Arndt Nicolas Edet David de la Cruz
9 Tadej Pogačar Nairo Quintana Geoffrey Bouchard
10 Primož Roglič Primož Roglič Primož Roglič Primož Roglič
11 Mikel Iturria Alex Aranburu
12 Philippe Gilbert Philippe Gilbert
13 Tadej Pogačar Tadej Pogačar Héctor Sáez
14 Sam Bennett Diego Rubio
15 Sepp Kuss Sergio Samitier
16 Jakob Fuglsang Geoffrey Bouchard Ángel Madrazo
17 Philippe Gilbert Nairo Quintana
18 Sergio Higuita Miguel Ángel López Sergio Higuita
19 Rémi Cavagna Rémi Cavagna
20 Tadej Pogačar Tadej Pogačar Tao Geoghegan Hart
21 Fabio Jakobsen not awarded
Final Primož Roglič Primož Roglič Geoffrey Bouchard Tadej Pogačar Movistar Team Miguel Ángel López
  • On stage two, Dario Cataldo and Jakob Fuglsang, who were second in the general classification, wore the green jersey and white with blue polka-dot jersey respectively, although no points were awarded during the opening team time trial stage for either ranking.
  • On stage two, James Knox, who was second in the young rider classification, wore the white jersey, because first placed Miguel Ángel López wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification. On stages six and eight, Tadej Pogačar wore the white jersey for the same reason.
  • On stage ten, Primož Roglič, who was second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Nairo Quintana wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification.
  • On stages eleven, twelve, and thirteen, Nairo Quintana, who was second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Primož Roglič wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification. On stage nineteen, Tadej Pogačar wore the green jersey for the same reason.
  • On stages fourteen and fifteen, Nairo Quintana, who was third in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Primož Roglič wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification, and second placed Tadej Pogačar wore the white jersey as leader of the young rider classification.
  • On stages sixteen and seventeen, Nairo Quintana, who was fourth in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Primož Roglič wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification, second placed Tadej Pogačar wore the white jersey as leader of the young rider classification, and third placed Alejandro Valverde wore the World Champion jersey.
  • On stage eighteen, Nairo Quintana, who was fourth in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Primož Roglič wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification, second placed Sam Bennett wore the Irish National Road Race Champion jersey, and third placed Tadej Pogačar wore the white jersey as leader of the young rider classification.
  • On stage nineteen, Tadej Pogačar, who was second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Primož Roglič wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification.
  • On stage twenty, Tadej Pogačar, who was fourth in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Primož Roglič wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification, second placed Sam Bennett wore the Irish National Road Race Champion jersey, and third placed Alejandro Valverde wore the World Champion jersey.
  • On stage twenty-one, Nairo Quintana, who was fifth in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because first placed Primož Roglič wore the red jersey as leader of the general classification, second placed Tadej Pogačar wore the white jersey as leader of the young rider classification, third placed Alejandro Valverde wore the World Champion jersey, and fourth placed Sam Bennett wore the Irish National Road Race Champion jersey.

Standings

Legend
Jersey red.svg
Denotes the winner of the general classification
Jersey green.svg
Denotes the winner of the points classification
Jersey blue polkadot.svg
Denotes the winner of the mountains classification
Jersey white.svg
Denotes the winner of the young rider classification
A white jersey with a red number bib.
Denotes the winner of the team classification
A white jersey with a yellow number bib.
Denotes the winner of the combativity award

General classification

Final general classification (1–10)[11]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Primož Roglič (SLO)
Jersey red.svg
Jersey green.svg
Team Jumbo–Visma 83h 07' 14"
2  Alejandro Valverde (ESP)
Jersey red number.svg
Movistar Team + 2' 33"
3  Tadej Pogačar (SLO)
Jersey white.svg
UAE Team Emirates + 2' 55"
4  Nairo Quintana (COL)
Jersey red number.svg
Movistar Team + 3' 46"
5  Miguel Ángel López (COL)
Jersey yellow number.svg
Astana + 4' 48"
6  Rafał Majka (POL) Bora–Hansgrohe + 7' 33"
7  Wilco Kelderman (NED) Team Sunweb + 10' 04"
8  Carl Fredrik Hagen (NOR) Lotto–Soudal + 12' 54"
9  Marc Soler (ESP)
Jersey red number.svg
Movistar Team + 22' 27"
10  Mikel Nieve (ESP) Mitchelton–Scott + 22' 34"

Points classification

Final points classification (1–10)[11]
Rank Rider Team Points
1  Primož Roglič (SLO)
Jersey green.svg
Jersey red.svg
Team Jumbo–Visma 155
2  Tadej Pogačar (SLO)
Jersey white.svg
UAE Team Emirates 136
3  Sam Bennett (IRL) Bora–Hansgrohe 134
4  Alejandro Valverde (ESP)
Jersey red number.svg
Movistar Team 132
5  Nairo Quintana (COL)
Jersey red number.svg
Movistar Team 100
6  Miguel Ángel López (COL)
Jersey yellow number.svg
Astana 76
7  Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Deceuninck–Quick-Step 73
8  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida 69
9  Tosh Van der Sande (BEL) Lotto–Soudal 63
10  Sergio Higuita (COL) EF Education First 62

Mountains classification

Final mountains classification (1–10)[11]
Rank Rider Team Points
1  Geoffrey Bouchard (FRA)
Jersey blue polkadot.svg
AG2R La Mondiale 76
2  Ángel Madrazo (ESP) Burgos BH 44
3  Sergio Samitier (ESP) Euskadi–Murias 42
4  Tadej Pogačar (SLO)
Jersey white.svg
UAE Team Emirates 38
5  Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR) Team Ineos 35
6  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos 31
7  Alejandro Valverde (ESP)
Jersey red number.svg
Movistar Team 29
8  Sergio Henao (COL) UAE Team Emirates 27
9  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana 24
10  Mikel Bizkarra (ESP) Euskadi–Murias 22

Young rider classification

Final young rider classification (1–10)[11]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Tadej Pogačar (SLO)
Jersey white.svg
UAE Team Emirates 83h 10' 09"
2  Miguel Ángel López (COL)
Jersey yellow number.svg
Astana + 1' 53"
3  James Knox (GBR) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 20' 00"
4  Sergio Higuita (COL) EF Education First + 29' 22"
5  Ruben Guerreiro (POR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 39' 10"
6  Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR) Team Ineos + 1h 01' 26"
7  Kilian Frankiny (SUI) Groupama–FDJ + 1h 08' 47"
8  Óscar Rodríguez (ESP) Euskadi–Murias + 1h 10' 19"
9  Ben O'Connor (AUS) Team Dimension Data + 1h 22' 58"
10  Sepp Kuss (USA) Team Jumbo–Visma + 1h 32' 38"

Team classification

Final team classification (1–10)[11]
Rank Team Time
1 Movistar Team
Jersey red number.svg
248h 26' 24"
2 Astana + 51' 38"
3 Team Jumbo–Visma + 2h 03' 42"
4 Mitchelton–Scott + 2h 26' 47"
5 AG2R La Mondiale + 3h 14' 09"
6 Team Sunweb + 3h 20' 01"
7 Euskadi–Murias + 3h 38' 55"
8 Bahrain–Merida + 3h 45' 14"
9 Team Dimension Data + 3h 55' 52"
10 Team Ineos + 4h 00' 34"

References

  1. ^ "UCI reveal WorldTour calendar for 2019". Cycling News. 15 June 2018. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  2. ^ Van Looy, Nicolás (25 August 2018). "Vuelta España 2019: Las Salinas de Torrevieja darán la salida" [Vuelta España 2019: Las Salinas de Torrevieja will give the start]. Ciclo21 (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  3. ^ "2019 Vuelta a Espana to start in Alicante region with time trial". Cycling News. 24 August 2018. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  4. ^ Roadbook 2019, pp. 23.
  5. ^ https://www.cyclingstage.com/vuelta-2019-favourites/
  6. ^ "Analyzing the Vuelta a España favorites". 2019-08-19.
  7. ^ Fotheringham, Alasdair (19 December 2018). "2019 Vuelta a Espana offers eight mountaintop finishes, goes off road". Cycling News. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  8. ^ Windsor, Richard (29 July 2019). "Vuelta a España 2019 route: all you need to know about the route for the 74th edition". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  9. ^ Roadbook 2019, pp. 4.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Roadbook 2019, pp. 6.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g "Official classifications of La Vuelta". La Vuelta. Retrieved 1 September 2019.

Sources

La Vuelta 2019 Roadbook. Vuelta a España. Unipublic. 2019.

External links

This page was last edited on 7 October 2020, at 20:36
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.