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2019 Boston City Council election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boston City Council elections will be held on November 5, 2019. Nine seats in the Boston City Council (five district representatives and four at-large members) are being contested; incumbents in four other districts are unopposed. By law, Boston municipal elections are nonpartisan—candidates do not represent a specific political party.

Nomination forms could be submitted starting April 17, and candidates had a filing deadline of May 21.[1] A preliminary election was held on September 24.[2]

Incumbents

Council President Andrea Campbell
Council President Andrea Campbell
District Name Councillor since Ref.
Incumbent councillors[3]
At-large Michelle Wu January 2014 [4]
Michael F. Flaherty January 2014 [5]
Annissa Essaibi George January 2016 [6]
Althea Garrisondouble-dagger January 2019 [7]
1 Lydia Edwards January 2018 [8]
2 Edward M. Flynn January 2018 [9]
3 Frank Baker January 2012 [10]
4 Andrea Campbelldagger January 2016 [11]
5 Timothy McCarthy January 2014 [12]
6 Matt O'Malley November 2010 [13]
7 Kim Janey January 2018 [14]
8 Josh Zakim January 2014 [15]
9 Mark Ciommo January 2008 [16]

dagger Council President
double-dagger Filled vacancy created by resignation of Ayanna Pressley upon her election to the United States House of Representatives

Announcements

  • On January 10, 2019, Timothy McCarthy announced that he would not seek re-election.[17]
  • On March 21, 2019, Josh Zakim announced that he would not seek re-election.[18]
  • On April 2, 2019, Mark Ciommo announced that he would not seek re-election.[19]

Results

2019 Boston City Council preliminary election signs in front of polling location.
2019 Boston City Council preliminary election signs in front of polling location.

A preliminary election was held on September 24 to select candidates for four districts, and at-large, for the general election.[20] Voter turnout was 11.17%, as 44,972 of the city's 402,536 registered voters cast ballots.[21][22]

At-large

The top eight vote-getters in the preliminary election qualified for the general election of four seats.[23]

Candidates Preliminary Election[21] General Election
Votes % Votes %
Michelle Wudagger 26,622 19.41
Annissa Essaibi Georgedagger 18,993 13.85
Michael F. Flahertydagger 18,766 13.68
Alejandra Nicole St. Guillen 11,910 8.68
Julia Mejia 10,799 7.87
Althea Garrisondagger 9,720 7.09
Erin J. Murphy 9,385 6.84
David Halbert 6,354 4.76
Martin Marty Keogh 6,246 4.55    
Jeffrey Michael Ross 5,078 3.70    
Priscilla E. Flint-Banks 4,094 2.98    
Domingos DaRosa 2,840 2.07    
Michel Denis 2,108 1.54    
William A. King 1,809 1.32    
Herb Alexander Lozano 1,510 1.10    
Write-in 766 0.56    

dagger Candidate for re-election

District 1

The incumbent, Lydia Edwards, is unopposed.[23]

District 2

The incumbent, Edward M. Flynn, is unopposed.[23]

District 3

The incumbent, Frank Baker, is unopposed.[23]

District 4

No preliminary election; both candidates are listed on the general election ballot.[23]

Candidates General Election
Votes %
Andrea Campbelldagger
Jeff Durham

dagger Candidate for re-election

District 5

The top two vote-getters in the preliminary election qualified for the general election.[23]

Candidates Preliminary Election[21] General Election
Votes % Votes %
Ricardo Arroyo 2,235 29.56
Maria Esdale Farrell 1,813 23.98
Jean-Claude Sanon 1,156 15.29    
Mimi E. Turchinetz 1,098 14.52    
Alkia T Powell 572 7.56    
Cecily Leticia Graham 399 5.28    
Justin Matthew Murad 154 2.04    
Yves Mary Jean 123 1.63    
Write-in 12 0.16    

District 6

The incumbent, Matt O'Malley, is unopposed.[23]

District 7

The top two vote-getters in the preliminary election qualified for the general election.[23]

Candidates Preliminary Election[21] General Election
Votes % Votes %
Kim Janeydagger 2,145 69.94
Roy Owens Sr. 517 16.86
Valerie Hope Rust 381 12.42    
Write-in 24 0.78    

dagger Candidate for re-election

District 8

The top two vote-getters in the preliminary election qualified for the general election.[23]

Candidates Preliminary Election[21] General Election
Votes % Votes %
Priscilla "Kenzie" Bok 2,032 50.38
Jennifer Ann Nassour 740 18.35
Helene Vincent 587 14.55    
Kristen Mobilia 511 12.67    
Montez David Haywood 149 3.69    
Write-in 14 0.35    

Nassour is vying to become the first self-identified (as Boston municipal elections are non-partisan) Republican elected to the City Council since John W. Sears in November 1979.[24][25]

District 9

The top two vote-getters in the preliminary election qualified for the general election.[23]

Candidates Preliminary Election[21] General Election
Votes % Votes %
Craig R. Cashman 1,218 25.41
Liz A. Breadon 1,129 23.55
Brandon David Bowser 763 15.92    
Daniel J. Daly 656 13.68    
Lee Nave Jr. 466 9.72    
Jonathan Lamar Allen 456 9.51    
Amanda Gail Smart 103 2.15    
Write-in 3 0.06    

Endorsements

Prior to the preliminary election:

  • The Boston Globe endorsed Ricardo Arroyo in District 5,[26] Kenzie Bok in District 8,[27] and Craig Cashman in District 9.[28] For at-large seats, the Globe endorsed incumbents Michelle Wu and Michael Flaherty, and newcomers David Halbert and Alejandra St. Guillen.[29]
  • Planned Parenthood endorsed Annissa Essaibi George, Michael Flaherty, and Michelle Wu for at-large seats, along with Lydia Edwards in District 1, Andrea Campbell in District 4, Matt O'Malley in District 6, and Kim Janey in District 7.[30]
  • The Massachusetts chapter of the Sierra Club endorsed Andrea Campbell in District 4, and Kim Janey in District 7.[31]
  • SEIU 32BJ (Service Employees International Union), SEIU Local 615 endorsed at-large candidates Julia Mejia, Alejandra St. Guillen, Annissa Essaibi George, and Michelle Wu; and endorsed Ricardo Arroyo in District 5, Kim Janey in District 7, and Kenzie Bok in District 8.[32]
  • Local 25 of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters endorsed Michael Flaherty, Michelle Wu, and Annissa Essaibi George for at-large seats, along with Lydia Edwards in District 1, Ed Flynn in District 2, Frank Baker in District 3, Andrea Campbell in District 4, Maria Esdale Farrell in District 5, Matt O'Malley in District 6, Kim Janey in District 7, and Daniel Daly in District 9.[33]
  • EMILY's List endorsed Lydia Edwards, Kim Janey, Michelle Wu, Annissa Essaibi George, and Andrea Campbell.[34]

Prior to the general election:

  • The Massachusetts chapter of the Sierra Club endorsed Kenzie Bok in District 8.[36]

References

  1. ^ Fisher, Jenna (April 3, 2019). "Another Boston Councilor Leaving". patch.com. Retrieved April 6, 2019.
  2. ^ "2019 Election Calendar". boston.gov. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  3. ^ "City Council". boston.gov. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  4. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/michelle-wu
  5. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/michael-flaherty
  6. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/annissa-essaibi-george
  7. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/althea-garrison
  8. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/lydia-edwards
  9. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/ed-flynn
  10. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/frank-baker
  11. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/andrea-campbell
  12. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/timothy-mccarthy
  13. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/matt-omalley
  14. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/kim-janey
  15. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/josh-zakim
  16. ^ https://www.boston.gov/departments/city-council/mark-ciommo
  17. ^ Sutherland, Brooks (January 10, 2019). "Tim McCarthy won't seek re-election to Boston City Council". Boston Herald. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  18. ^ Dwyer, Dialynn (March 21, 2019). "Boston City Councilor Josh Zakim releases statement on not seeking re-election". Boston.com. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  19. ^ Valencia, Milton J. (April 2, 2019). "Mark Ciommo to leave Boston City Council after this term, in another departure". The Boston Globe. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  20. ^ "CERTIFIED LIST OF CANDIDATES FOR CITY COUNCILLOR-AT-LARGE IN BALLOT ORDER PRELIMINARY MUNICIPAL ELECTION – SEPTEMBER 24, 2019" (PDF). City of Boston. July 2019. Retrieved July 21, 2019 – via boston.gov. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  21. ^ a b c d e f "UNOFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS". boston.gov. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  22. ^ Hilliard, John (September 25, 2019). "City Council incumbents Wu, Flaherty advance to November". The Boston Globe. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "CERTIFIED LIST OF CANDIDATES FOR CITY COUNCILLOR-AT-LARGE IN ALPHA ORDER" (PDF). City of Boston. Retrieved October 18, 2019 – via boston.gov.
  24. ^ adamg (May 6, 2019). "Lawyer best known for Republican efforts joins race to replace Josh Zakim on the Boston City Council". universalhub.com. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  25. ^ "New England elections". The Transcript. North Adams, Massachusetts. AP. November 7, 1979. p. 3. Retrieved October 18, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "Hyde Park's Ricardo Arroyo best choice for District 5 council seat". The Boston Globe. September 17, 2019. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  27. ^ "First-time candidate Kenzie Bok wows the District 8 field". The Boston Globe. September 17, 2019. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  28. ^ "Craig Cashman best prepared for District 9". The Boston Globe. September 17, 2019. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  29. ^ "Wu, Flaherty, Halbert, St. Guillen: Our picks for at-large Boston City Council seats". The Boston Globe. September 18, 2019. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  30. ^ "2019 Municipal Endorsements". plannedparenthoodaction.org. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  31. ^ "2019 Endorsements". sierraclub.org. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  32. ^ "32BJ SEIU Announces Boston City Council Endorsements". seiu32bj.org (Press release). August 7, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  33. ^ Souza, Scott (August 29, 2019). "Teamsters Local 25 Endorses Boston City Council Candidates". patch.com. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  34. ^ Valencia, Milton J. (September 19, 2019). "EMILY's List endorses five female Boston City Council incumbents". The Boston Globe. Retrieved September 19, 2019.
  35. ^ a b "Today's mission: Choose 8 from 15 for citywide Council". Dorchester Reporter. Dorchester, Boston. September 19, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  36. ^ "Environmental Advocates Support Kenzie Bok for Boston City Council". Beacon Hill Times. October 18, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.

Further reading

External links

This page was last edited on 20 October 2019, at 15:57
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