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2018 Wisconsin elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 Wisconsin elections

← 2017
2019 →

The 2018 Wisconsin Fall General Election was held in the U.S. state of Wisconsin on November 6, 2018. All of Wisconsin's executive and administrative officers were up for election as well as one of Wisconsin's U.S. Senate seats, Wisconsin's eight seats in the United States House of Representatives, seventeen seats in the Wisconsin State Senate, and all 99 seats in the Wisconsin State Assembly. The 2018 Wisconsin Fall Partisan Primary was held August 14, 2018. There were also special elections held during 2018 for three State Assembly seats and two State Senate seats.

The Democrats swept in all of the fall elections for statewide officials, unseating three incumbent Republicans, including two-term Governor Scott Walker, and winning the open race for State Treasurer. Republicans maintained control of both chambers in the Wisconsin Legislature however, as well as a majority of the state's U.S. House seats.[1]

The 2018 Wisconsin Spring Election was held April 3, 2018. This election featured a contested election for Wisconsin Supreme Court, as well as a referendum on an amendment to the Constitution of Wisconsin, and various other nonpartisan local and judicial races. The 2018 Wisconsin Spring Primary was held on February 20, 2018.

In the nonpartisan Supreme Court election, the Wisconsin Democrats also claimed victory, as their preferred candidate defeated the Republicans' preferred candidate, reducing the Republican majority on the court to 4–3.

Federal

Senate

Incumbent Democrat Tammy Baldwin, first elected in 2012, won re-election to a second term by a 11 percentage point margin against Republican challenger Leah Vukmir. This was the widest margin of victory won by a statewide candidate in Wisconsin's 2018 elections, and marked the widest margin won by a U.S. Senate candidate in Wisconsin since Herb Kohl's landslide victory in the 2006 election.

United States Senate election in Wisconsin, 2018[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tammy Baldwin (incumbent) 1,472,914 55.4
Republican Leah Vukmir 1,184,885 44.5
n/a Write-ins 2,964 0.1
Total votes 2,660,763 100.0
Democratic hold

House of Representatives

All 8 of Wisconsin's congressional districts were up for election in November. Seven incumbents ran for re-election, while the 1st district saw an open race after incumbent and then-Speaker of the House Paul Ryan announced his retirement. [3] No seats flipped in the election, with Republicans continuing to hold 5 of the state's House seats to the Democrats' 3.

District Democratic Republican Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 137,508 42.27% 177,492 54.56% 10,317 3.17% 325,317 100.00% Republican Hold
District 2 309,116 97.42% 0 0.00% 8,179 2.58% 317,295 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 3 187,888 59.65% 126,980 40.31% 121 0.04% 314,989 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 4 206,487 75.61% 59,091 21.64% 7,509 2.75% 273,087 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 5 138,385 37.99% 225,619 61.93% 284 0.08% 364,288 100.00% Republican Hold
District 6 144,536 44.46% 180,311 55.47% 218 0.07% 325,065 100.00% Republican Hold
District 7 124,307 38.50% 194,061 60.11% 4,472 1.39% 322,840 100.00% Republican Hold
District 8 119,265 36.28% 209,410 63.69% 99 0.03% 328,774 100.00% Republican Hold
Total 1,367,492 53.18% 1,172,964 45.61% 31,199 1.21% 2,571,655 100.00%

State

Executive

All of Wisconsin's executive offices saw close election results, with the largest vote difference in any race being eight-term incumbent Secretary of State Doug La Follette‘s 5.5 percent margin of victory. Every executive office was won by the Democratic candidate.

Governor

Incumbent Republican Governor Scott Walker, first elected in 2010, sought re-election to a third term. Despite having won two prior elections and a recall by fairly comfortable margins, Walker faced rising unpopularity due to his policies regarding infrastructure and education, among other issues, resulting in a close race. [4] [5] Low approval in Wisconsin of incumbent Republican U.S. President Donald Trump also harmed Walker in the election. [6]

In the end, Walker was ultimately defeated by Democrat Tony Evers by a narrow one percent margin, ending 8 years of unified Republican control of the state.

Other candidates included Libertarian Phil Anderson and Independent Maggie Turnbull.

Wisconsin gubernatorial election, 2018[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tony Evers 1,324,307 49.5
Republican Scott Walker (incumbent) 1,295,080 48.4
Libertarian Phil Anderson 20,255 0.8
Independent Maggie Turnbull 18,884 0.7
Green Michael White 11,087 0.4
Independent Arnie Enz 2,745 0.1
Write-in 980 0.1
Total votes 2,673,308 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

Lieutenant Governor

Former State Representative Mandela Barnes defeated incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch, who had served since 2010, and Libertarian Patrick Baird.[7] Barnes became Wisconsin's first African-American Lieutenant Governor, and the second African-American ever elected to state office in Wisconsin. [8]

Administrative

Attorney General

Republican incumbent Brad Schimel, first elected in 2014, ran for re-election to a second term.[9] Voting rights attorney and former federal prosecutor Josh Kaul, the Democratic nominee, defeated Schimel in the general election.[10] Terry Larson, the Constitution Party nominee, also garnered around 2% of the vote, greater than the vote difference between Schimel and Kaul.

Wisconsin Attorney General election, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Josh Kaul 1,305,902 49.4
Republican Brad Schimel (incumbent) 1,288,712 48.8
Constitution Terry Larson 47,038 1.8
Write-in 1,199 0.0
Total votes 2,642,851 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

Secretary of State

Incumbent Democrat Doug La Follette, first elected in 1982 (and also serving from 1975 to 1979), won re-election to a tenth non-consecutive term. Madison Alderwoman Arvina Martin challenged La Follette in the Democratic primary.

Jay Schroeder was nominated in the Republican primary to run against La Follette, pledging to abolish the position if elected.[11]

Libertarian sports announcer Rich Reynolds declared his candidacy for the position as well, joining the "TeamGuv" bill with Phil Anderson and Patrick Baird.

Governing magazine projected the race as "safe Democratic".[12]

Wisconsin Secretary of State election, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Doug La Follette (incumbent) 1,380,752 52.7
Republican Jay Schroeder 1,235,034 47.2
Write-in 2,162 0.1
Total votes 2,617,948 100.0
Democratic hold

Treasurer

Earlier in the year, a referendum had been held on whether or not to abolish the State Treasurer office, a move that Wisconsin voters rejected by a margin of more than 20 percent. [13]

Incumbent Republican Matt Adamczyk, first elected in 2014, chose not to run for reelection. Sarah Godlewski, the Democratic nominee, defeated Republican Travis Hartwig in the general.

Wisconsin Treasurer election, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sarah Godlewski 1,324,110 50.9
Republican Travis Hartwig 1,216,811 46.8
Constitution Andrew Zuelke 59,570 2.2
Write-in 1,471 0.1
Total votes 2,601,962 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

Legislature

State Senate

Two special elections had been held earlier in the year for the 1st and 10th districts. Both races were won by Democrats, despite the respective districts’ usual Republican leanings.[14][15]

The 17 odd-numbered districts out of the 33 seats in the Wisconsin Senate were up for election in 2018, including the 1st district. In total, Republicans had 10 seats up for election, while Democrats had 7. André Jacque was able to win back the 1st district seat for Republicans from Democrat Caleb Frostman, who had defeated him in the June special election.[16]

At the start of 2018, the senate had a composition of 18 Republicans and 13 Democrats with 2 vacancies. The net result of all 2018 state senate elections was a gain of 1 seat for both parties. When compared to the 2016 general election, however, the Republican majority was reduced from 20 to 13 (60.6%) to 19-14 (57.6%).

Summary
Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
Last election (2016) 13 20 33 0
Before 2018 18 31 2
After Jan. 16 Special 14 32 1
After June 12 Special 15 33 0
Up in 2018 General 7 10 17
Incumbent retiring 1 2 3
After 2018 elections 14 19 33 0
Voting share 42% 58%

State Assembly

All 99 seats in the Wisconsin State Assembly were up for election in 2018. There were also two special elections for three Assembly vacancies during the course of 2018. Republicans lost one seat to the Democrats in the 2018 general election, resulting a 63-36 seat Republican majority going into the 2019-2020 session.

Summary
Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
Last election (2016) 35 64 99 0
Before 2018 34 62 96 3
After Jan. 16 Special 35 63 98 1
After June 12 Special 64 99 0
Up in 2018 General 35 64 99
Incumbent retiring 4 9 13
Incumbent lost primary 2 0 2
Total without Incumbent 6 9 15
After 2018 elections 36 63 99 0
Voting share 36% 64%

Judiciary

State Supreme Court

There was an election for Wisconsin Supreme Court in 2018 to replace the retiring Justice Michael Gableman. Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Rebecca Dallet defeated Sauk County Circuit Judge Michael Screnock. Madison attorney Tim Burns did not advance from the February primary election.

.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Dallet 40–60%   Dallet 60–70%   Dallet 70–90%   Screnock 40–60%   Screnock 60–70%   Screnock 70–90%
  Dallet 40–60%
  Dallet 60–70%
  Dallet 70–90%
  Screnock 40–60%
  Screnock 60–70%
  Screnock 70–90%
Wisconsin Supreme Court Election, 2018[17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Primary Election, February 20, 2018
Nonpartisan Michael Screnock 247,582 46.28%
Nonpartisan Rebecca Dallet 191,268 35.75%
Nonpartisan Tim Burns 95,508 17.85%
Scattering 622 0.12%
Total votes '534,980' '100.0%'
General Election, April 3, 2018
Nonpartisan Rebecca Dallet 555,848 55.72%
Nonpartisan Michael Screnock 440,808 44.19%
Scattering 829 0.08%
Total votes '997,485' '100.0%'

State Court of Appeals

Two seats on the Wisconsin Court of Appeals were up for election in 2018, but both seats were uncontested.

State Circuit Courts

Fifty three of the state's 249 circuit court seats were up for election in 2018. Eleven of those seats were contested. Only one incumbent was defeated seeking re-election, Shaughnessy Murphy—an appointee of Governor Scott Walker in the Eau Claire Circuit.

Circuit Branch Incumbent Elected Defeated Defeated in Primary
Name Votes % Name Votes % Name(s)
Ashland Robert E. Eaton Kelly J. McKnight 2,181 97.72%
Brown 2 Thomas J. Walsh Thomas J. Walsh 28,323 99.24%
6 John P. Zakowski John P. Zakowski 30,141 99.26%
Buffalo–Pepin James J. Duvall Thomas W. Clark 2,650 56.58% Roger M. Hillestad 2,030 43.34%
Calumet Jeffrey S. Froehlich Jeffrey S. Froehlich 5,531 99.41%
Chippewa 1 Steven H. Gibbs Steven H. Gibbs 8,170 100.00%
Clark Jon M. Counsell Lyndsey Boon Brunette 4,028 76.40% Roberta A. Heckes 1,240 23.52%
Columbia 3 Alan White Troy D. Cross 5,059 50.27% Brenda L. Yaskal 4,974 49.42% Steven J. Sarbacker
Clifford C . Burdon
Dane 1 Timothy Samuelson Susan M. Crawford 59,048 51.40% Marilyn Townsend 55,234 49.08%
8 Frank D. Remington Frank D. Remington 84,723 98.62%
11 Ellen K. Berz Ellen K. Berz 84,711 98.74%
Door 1 D. Todd Ehlers D. Todd Ehlers 5,789 98.99%
Eau Claire 3 William M. Gabler, Sr. Emily M. Long 13,036 98.89%
4 Jon M. Theisen Jon M. Theisen 13,238 98.89%
5 Shaughnessy Murphy Sarah Harless 10,530 61.28% Shaughnessy Murphy 6,635 38.61%
Jefferson 3 Robert F. Dehring, Jr. Robert F. Dehring, Jr. 9,356 98.82%
Juneau 1 John Pier Roemer Stacy A. Smith 2,517 52.58% Scott Harold Southworth 2,268 47.38%
Kenosha 2 Jason A. Rossell Jason A. Rossell 13,831 98.68%
Manitowoc 2 Gary Bendix Jerilyn M. Dietz 10,199 62.84% Ralph Sczygelski 6,008 37.02% Patricia Koppa
Eric Pangburn
John Bilka
Menominee–Shawano 2 William F. Kussel, Jr. William F. Kussel, Jr. 4,586 100.00%
Milwaukee 8 William Sosnay William Sosnay 69,756 98.45%
17 Carolina Maria Stark Carolina Maria Stark 70,087 98.65%
20 Dennis P. Moroney Joseph Wall 68,878 98.65%
23 Lindsey Grady Lindsey Grady 69,389 98.78%
28 Mark A. Sanders Mark A. Sanders 68,935 98.77%
38 Jeffrey A. Wagner Jeffrey A. Wagner 71,889 98.59%
39 Jane V. Carroll Jane V. Carroll 68,981 98.82%
43 Marshall B. Murray Marshall B. Murray 67,787 98.79%
Monroe 3 J. David Rice Rick Radcliffe 5,241 99.45%
Oneida 2 Michael H. Bloom Michael H. Bloom 5,896 99.44%
Outagamie 4 Gregory B. Gill, Jr. Gregory B. Gill, Jr. 18,226 100.00%
5 Carrie Schneider Carrie Schneider 18,875 100.00%
7 John A. Des Jardins John A. Des Jardins 18,841 100.00%
Portage 1 Thomas B. Eagon Thomas B. Eagon 8,620 99.52%
3 Thomas T. Flugaur Thomas T. Flugaur 8,655 99.40%
Price Douglas T. Fox Kevin G. Klein 2,599 65.68% Mark T. Fuhr 1,358 34.32%
Racine 1 Wynne P. Laufenberg Wynne P. Laufenberg 19,216 98.96%
5 Mike Piontek Mike Piontek 19,827 99.06%
9 Robert S. Repischak Robert S. Repischak 19,183 99.01%
10 Timothy D. Boyle Timothy D. Boyle 19,727 99.13%
Richland Andrew Sharp Andrew Sharp 2,816 99.61%
Rock 3 Jeffrey S. Kuglitsch Jeffrey S. Kuglitsch 16,739 99.03%
7 Barbara W. McCrory Barbara W. McCrory 17,282 99.13%
St. Croix 3 Scott R. Needham Scott R. Needham 9,687 99.08%
Sauk 3 Guy D. Reynolds Pat Barrett 5,701 50.11% Sandra Cardo Gorsuch 5,675 49.89%
Walworth 1 Phillip A. Koss Phillip A. Koss 12,763 98.92%
Washington 4 Andrew T. Gonring Andrew T. Gonring 21,026 100.00%
Waukesha 2 Jennifer R. Dorow Jennifer R. Dorow 55,483 98.97%
12 Kathryn W. Foster Laura Lau 38,138 50.29% Jack Melvin 37,517 49.47%
Waupaca 3 Raymond S. Huber Raymond S. Huber 5,979 99.52%
Winnebago 1 Thomas J. Gritton Teresa S. Basiliere 12,205 56.39% Scott A. Ceman 9,391 43.39%
4 Karen L. Seifert Karen L. Seifert 16,960 99.18%
Wood 2 Nicholas J. Brazeau, Jr. Nicholas J. Brazeau, Jr. 9,361 100.00%

Constitutional Amendment

In the Spring election, Wisconsin voters strongly rejected an amendment to the Constitution of Wisconsin which would have abolished the office of State Treasurer of Wisconsin.[19]

Elimination of State Treasurer
Candidate Votes %
No 582,117 61
Yes 365,120 39
Total votes 947,237 100

Post-Election

Accusations of Gerrymandering

In the weeks following the election, Wisconsin's legislative districts came under wide scrutiny as an example of gerrymandering due to the fact that while Republicans won a fairly wide majority in the Wisconsin State Assembly, the Democrats garnered nearly 9 percent more of the overall statewide vote. [20] [21] In addition, Wisconsin was notable for being the only state in the 2018 elections where Republicans won a majority of the state's seats in the U.S. House while Democrats won a majority of the overall votes.

Lame Duck Legislative Session

Early in December 2018, a special legislative session was called by outgoing Governor  Scott Walker to pass a series of bills to limit the powers of Governor-elect Tony Evers, whom Walker had lost to in the election, as well as incoming State attorney general Josh Kaul. [22]

Other bills being considered included restrictions on early voting and the passage of Medicaid work requirements, which Walker had previously held off on due to the election. [23]A similar law restricting early voting that was passed several years prior had been ruled as unconstitutional. [24]

The bills were widely denounced by Democrats and others as a “power grab.” Congresswoman Gwen Moore of Wisconsin's 4th district described the move as a “coup” that “hijacked the voters’ will.” [25] Lawsuits were filed by Evers and various labor unions almost immediately after Walker signed the bills into law. [26]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Wisconsin Election Results". New York Times. 2018-11-06. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  2. ^ a b https://elections.wi.gov/sites/default/files/County%20by%20County%20Report-2018%20Gen%20Election-US%20Senator.pdf
  3. ^ "Paul Ryan explains why he decided to retire". CNBC. 2018-04-11. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  4. ^ "'Scott-Holes' campaign targets voters already upset over state's roads". Daily Reporter. 2018-07-27. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  5. ^ "Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's assault on public education could be coming back to bite him". New York Times. 2018-10-18. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  6. ^ "Trump approval sags in trio of midwestern states". NBC News. 2018-07-25. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  7. ^ Marley, Patrick (November 6, 2018). "Tony Evers denies Scott Walker a third term as Wisconsin's governor". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  8. ^ Marley, Patrick (November 7, 2018). "Mandela Barnes To Become First African-American Lieutenant Governor". Wisconsin Public Radio. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  9. ^ DeFour, Matthew (May 14, 2016). "Glenn Grothman cites transgender bathroom legal battle as sign of 'moral decline'". Racine Journal Times. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  10. ^ Beck, Molly (November 7, 2018). "Josh Kaul declares victory over Brad Schimel in attorney general's race". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  11. ^ "Schroeder Campaign:Eliminate Secretary of State Position" (PDF). February 19, 2018. Retrieved February 24, 2019.
  12. ^ Jacobson, Louis (4 June 2018). "Secretary of State Races Are More Competitive and Important Than Ever". Governing. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  13. ^ "Voters by a wide margin keep Wisconsin's 170 year old state treasurer's office". journal sentinel. 2018-04-04. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  14. ^ "Democrats flip State Senate Seat In Wisconsin". Washington Post. 2018-01-16. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  15. ^ "Caleb Frostman defeats André Jacque in 1st Senate District special election". Green Bay Press Gazette. 2018-06-12. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  16. ^ "André Jacque wins Senate District 1 Seat". Green Bay Press Gazette. 2018-11-07. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  17. ^ Canvass Results for 2018 Spring Primary - 2/20/2018 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Elections Commission. March 5, 2018. p. 1. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  18. ^ Canvass Results for 2018 Spring Election - 4/3/2018 (PDF) (Report). Wisconsin Elections Commission. April 27, 2018. p. 1. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  19. ^ Glauber, Bill; Stein, Jason (April 3, 2018). "Voters by a wide margin keep Wisconsin's 170-year-old state treasurer's office". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  20. ^ "Chart of the Day: Wisconsin gerrymandering was awesome". Mother Jones. 2018-12-04. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  21. ^ "Wisconsin gerrymandering: data shows stark impact of redistricting". jsonline.com. 2018-12-06. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  22. ^ "Wisconsin Republicans seek to hobble Democrats in lame duck session". The Guardian. 2018-12-02. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  23. ^ "Scott Walker, in fight for political life, slow walks Medicaid work rules". Politico. 2018-10-16. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  24. ^ "Judge strikes down Wisconsin voter ID, early voting laws". journal sentinel. 2016-08-01. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  25. ^ "Tony Evers: calling Wisconsin GOP power grab a coup 'seems strong'". Huffpost. 2018-12-09. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  26. ^ "A look at lawsuits challenging Wisconsin's lame duck laws". AP News. 2019-02-04. Retrieved 2019-07-22.

External links

Official Attorney General campaign websites
Official Secretary of State campaign websites
Official Treasurer campaign websites
This page was last edited on 23 October 2020, at 19:01
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