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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All eleven Virginia seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 4 7
Seats won 7 4
Seat change Increase 3 Decrease 3
Popular vote 1,867,061 1,408,701
Percentage 56.36% 42.52%
Swing Increase 7.19% Decrease 6.22%

The United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2018 were held on November 6, 2018, to elect the 11 U.S. Representatives from the state of Virginia, one from each of the state's 11 congressional districts. The elections coincided with other states' elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. Primary elections took place on June 12.[1] The state congressional delegation flipped from a 7–4 Republican majority to a 7–4 Democratic majority. Democrats last held a majority of seats in the state in 2010.

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Contents

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2018[2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Democratic 1,867,061 56.36% 4 7 +3
Republican 1,408,701 42.52% 7 4 -3
Libertarian 13,995 0.42% 0 0 -
Independents/Write-In 23,157 0.70% 0 0 -
Totals 3,312,914 100.00% 11 11

By district

Results of the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia by district:[3]

District Democratic Republican Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 148,464 44.70% 183,250 55.18% 387 0.12% 332,101 100.0% Republican Hold
District 2 139,571 51.05% 133,458 48.81% 371 0.14% 273,400 100.0% Democratic Gain
District 3 198,615 91.22% 0 0.00% 19,107 8.78% 217,722 100.0% Democratic Hold
District 4 187,642 62.58% 107,706 35.92% 4,506 1.50% 299,854 100.0% Democratic Hold
District 5 145,040 46.65% 165,339 53.18% 547 0.18% 310,926 100.0% Republican Hold
District 6 113,133 40.21% 167,957 59.69% 287 0.10% 281,377 100.0% Republican Hold
District 7 176,079 50.34% 169,295 48.40% 4,429 1.27% 349,803 100.0% Democratic Gain
District 8 247,137 76.10% 76,899 23.68% 712 0.22% 324,748 100.0% Democratic Hold
District 9 85,833 34.75% 160,933 65.16% 214 0.09% 246,980 100.0% Republican Hold
District 10 206,356 56.11% 160,841 43.73% 598 0.16% 367,795 100.0% Democratic Gain
District 11 219,191 71.11% 83,023 26.93% 6,036 1.96% 308,250 100.0% Democratic Hold
Total 1,867,061 56.36% 1,408,701 42.52% 37,194 1.12% 3,312,956 100.0%

District 1

Republican Rob Wittman had represented Virginia's 1st congressional district since 2007. He was re-elected in 2016 with 60% of the vote. Wittman was unopposed for the Republican nomination.

Democratic primary

Vangie Williams defeated both Edwin Santana and John Suddarth in the Democratic primary with 39.97% of the vote. [1] If elected she would be the first woman of color in history to represent the state of Virginia in Congress.[2]

Candidates[4]

  • Edwin Santana, former Marine
  • Vangie Williams, author
  • John Suddarth

Results

Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vangie Williams 11,008 39.97
Democratic Edwin Santana 9,059 32.90
Democratic John Suddarth 7,471 27.13
Total votes 27,538 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Endorsements

Vangie Williams
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State officials
State senate
State delegates
Individuals
  • Khizr Khan, Gold Star father
  • Susan Platt, Candidate for Lt. Governor of Virginia in 2017
Organizations
  • Equal Vote Local
  • National Women's Political Caucus
  • American Women's Party
  • Moms Demand Action
  • Democrats Work For America
  • Move On
  • National Organization For Women
  • Feminist Majority Foundation
  • Broader Representation Advocacy Team
  • Freethought Equality Fund PAC
  • Youth Initiative for National Action
  • Vote Pro-Choice
  • LGBT Democrats
  • SEIU (Virginia 512)
  • Virginia AFL-CIO
  • Sierra Club
  • National Education Association
  • Network for Public Education Action
  • Democratic Asian Americans of Virginia
  • Virginia Democratic Small Business Caucus
  • Virginia Democrats Women's Caucus
  • Liberal Women of Chesterfield County
Rob Wittman
Organizations
  • Campaign for Working Families[7]

Debates

Results

Virginia's 1st congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (incumbent) 183,250 55.2
Democratic Vangie Williams 148,464 44.7
n/a Write-ins 387 0.1
Total votes 332,101 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

Republican incumbent Scott Taylor was in a race targeted by the DCCC. This was one of only two GOP held seats that voted for Democrat Ralph Northam in 2017. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee supported Elaine Luria, a United States Naval Commander for the nomination.[9]

Roanoke Commonwealth's Attorney Donald Caldwell has been appointed as a special prosecutor to investigate claims that Taylor's aides forged signatures, including those of Delegate Glenn Davis and his wife,[10] on Shaun Brown's petitions to make the ballot as an independent candidate. Taylor had already cut ties with his campaign manager when these irregularities came to light and promised to cooperate with the investigation, and said that the irregularities in the petitions should have no bearing on Brown's right to be on the ballot.[11]

Shaun Brown submitted 2,163 petition signatures which actually went through the verification process. 1,030 of those were considered valid.[10] Democrats asked the Virginia State Board of Elections to remove Brown from the ballot for falling short of the 1,000 signatures required,[12] and have filed suit.[13] They have also asked Attorney General of Virginia Mark Herring to investigate.[14]

A review of the signatures also revealed that more than 50 Virginia Beach sheriff's employees signed petitions forms at work to get Brown on the ballot during the closing days of the petition drive, when petitioners were scrambling to meet the deadline.[15]

Brown was accused by federal prosecutors of lying to the Federal Election Commission about donating $700,000 to her campaign and bilking the government by falsifying the number of meals her nonprofit fed to needy children, but her trial—in which Brown testified in her own defense and was subjected to a lengthy cross-examination[16]—ended in a mistrial after the jury deadlocked 11–1.[17] A new trial has been set to begin on October 9 and run for seven days.[18]

In September, circuit judge Gregory Rupe ordered Brown off the ballot. Brown subsequently appealed to the Virginia Supreme Court but justices declined to hear her case. The Virginia Attorney General's office argued that it was too late for her to appear on the ballot.[19]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Results

Democratic primary results[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elaine Luria 17,552 62.33
Democratic Karen Mallard 10,610 37.67
Total votes 28,162 100.0

Republican primary

Taylor was challenged in the Republican primary by former James City County Supervisor Mary Jones, who attacked Rep. Taylor for his moderate stances and because she believed he hasn't backed President Donald Trump's proposals strongly enough.[21]

Results

Republican primary results[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Taylor (incumbent) 28,515 76.05
Republican Mary Jones 8,982 23.95
Total votes 37,497 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Elaine Luria
State officials
U.S Representatives
State Senators
State Delegates
Individuals
  • Kenny Alexander, Mayor of Norfolk
Organizations
  • Emily's List
  • League of Conservation Voters
  • End Citizens United
  • VoteVets
  • Virginia AFL-CIO
  • Social Security Works PAC
  • SEIU Virginia 512
  • 314 Action Fund
  • Planned Parenthood Action Fund
  • NARAL Pro-Choice America
  • Black Economic Alliance
  • Giffords PAC
  • Humane Society Legislative Fund
  • International Union of Operating Engineers
  • American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees
  • National Women's Political Caucus
  • Coalition to stop gun violence
  • Pride Fund to end gun violence
  • Teamsters Local 822
  • National Organization for Women’s Political Action Committee
  • Asian American Democratic Club
  • Democratic Asian Americans of Virginia
  • Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Scott
Taylor (R)
Elaine
Luria (D)
Undecided
Change Research (D) November 2–4, 2018 710 47% 47% 6%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 18–22, 2018 508 ± 4.6% 45% 42% 13%
Christopher Newport University October 3–12, 2018 798 ± 4.0% 50% 43% 7%
NYT Upshot/Siena College September 26 – October 1, 2018 500 ± 4.5% 49% 41% 10%
Change Research (D) September 26–28, 2018 758 46% 46%
Garin-Hart-Yang Research Group (D-Luria) September 5–8, 2018 404 ± 5.0% 43% 51%
Public Policy Polling (D) April 16–17, 2018 609 ± 4.0% 48% 42% 10%

Results

Virginia's 2nd congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elaine Luria 139,571 51.1
Republican Scott Taylor (incumbent) 133,458 48.8
n/a Write-ins 371 0.1
Total votes 273,400 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 3

Democratic incumbent Bobby Scott ran unopposed,[26] as no Republican candidates filed for this district.

Democratic primary

General election

Results

Virginia's 3rd congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bobby Scott (incumbent) 198,615 91.2
n/a Write-ins 19,107 8.8
Total votes 217,772 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4

After the 4th district was redrawn by the courts for the 2016 elections, Democratic incumbent Donald McEachin was elected and ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[27]

Democratic primary

Republican primary

Candidates

  • Ryan McAdams, pastor
  • Shion Fenty, fashion designer

Results

Republican primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ryan McAdams 17,513 72.57
Republican Shion Fenty 6,621 27.43
Total votes 24,134 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Ryan McAdams
Federal officials

Results

Virginia's 4th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donald McEachin (incumbent) 187,642 62.6
Republican Ryan McAdams 107,706 35.9
Libertarian Pete Wells 4,233 1.4
n/a Write-ins 273 0.1
Total votes 299,854 100.00
Democratic hold

District 5

Incumbent Tom Garrett Jr., first elected in 2016, announced on May 28 2018 that he would not run for reelection due to his struggle with alcoholism.[30] Instead of a traditional primary to elect the Democratic and Republican nominees, party delegates voted to hold district conventions instead.

Democratic convention

The Democratic convention was held on May 5, 2018. The party delegates chose Leslie Cockburn as the Democratic nominee.[31]

Candidates

Republican convention

The Republican convention was held on June 2, 2018, less than one week after incumbent Tom Garrett Jr. announced he would not seek reelection. Denver Riggleman edged out Cynthia Dunbar, who had just lost the Republican nomination in the 6th district just weeks before, in the final round of voting to get the Republican nomination.[34]

Candidates

General election

Debates

Endorsements

Denver Riggleman
Federal officials

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Denver
Riggleman (R)
Leslie
Cockburn (D)
Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 16–22, 2018 501 ± 4.6% 45% 46% 10%
TargetPoint (R) October 14–16, 2018 406 48% 43%

Results

Virginia's 5th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Denver Riggleman 165,339 53.2
Democratic Leslie Cockburn 145,040 46.6
n/a Write-ins 547 0.2
Total votes 310,926 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The 6th district was an open seat in 2018, after the Republican incumbent, Bob Goodlatte, representative from the 6th district since 1993, announced his retirement in November 2017.[37][38]

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results[39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jennifer Lewis 8,202 47.67
Democratic Peter Volosin 4,678 27.19
Democratic Charlotte Moore 3,175 18.45
Democratic Sergio Coppola 1,150 6.68
Total votes 17,205 100.0

Republican convention

Republican delegates decided to hold a party convention instead of the primary to choose their nominee. Eight Republicans ran in the convention in this district, where State Delegate Ben Cline was chosen as the GOP nominee.

Candidates

  • Ben Cline, state delegate
  • Chaz Haywood
  • Douglas Wright
  • Cynthia Dunbar
  • Ed Justo
  • Kathryn Lewis
  • Elliot Pope
  • Mike Desjadon[40]

General election

Results

Virginia's 6th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ben Cline 167,957 59.7
Democratic Jennifer Lewis 113,133 40.2
n/a Write-ins 287 0.1
Total votes 281,377 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

After Dave Brat upset the former House Majority leader, Eric Cantor, in 2014, Brat won reelection in 2016 with 57% of the vote. Helen Alli originally was going to run as a Democrat but failed to turn in enough signatures; she then was nominated by the Whigs but again failed to turn in enough signatures; finally running as a write-in candidate.[41]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Results

Democratic primary results[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Abigail Spanberger 33,210 72.68
Democratic Daniel Ward 12,483 27.32
Total votes 45,693 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Debates

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dave
Brat (R)
Abigail
Spanberger (D)
Joe
Walton (L)
Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 30 – November 4, 2018 500 ± 4.6% 46% 44% 2% 9%
Christopher Newport University October 18–27, 2018 871 ± 4.2% 45% 46% 4% 3%
Monmouth University September 15–24, 2018 329 LV ± 5.4% 47% 47% <1% 6%
400 RV ± 4.9% 42% 47% 2% 9%
Normington, Petts & Associates (D) September 18–20, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 47% 47% 6%
NYT Upshot/Siena College September 10–11, 2018 501 ± 5.0% 47% 43% 9%

Results

Virginia's 7th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Abigail Spanberger 176,079 50.3
Republican Dave Brat (incumbent) 169,295 48.4
Libertarian Joe Walton 4,216 1.2
n/a Write-ins 155 0.1
Total votes 349,745 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 8

In the 8th district, Democrat Don Beyer had served since the 2014 election. Beyer won reelection in 2016 with 68% of the vote.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Thomas Oh, federal contractor

General election

Results

Virginia's 8th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Don Beyer (incumbent) 247,137 76.1
Republican Thomas Oh 76,899 23.7
n/a Write-ins 712 0.2
Total votes 324,748 100.0
Democratic hold

District 9

In the 9th district, Republican Morgan Griffith had two Democratic opponents, Anthony Flaccavento and Justin Santopietro, and a Whig opponent, Scott Blankenship,[47] in this strongly Republican district.[48]

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony Flaccavento 10,756 78.64
Democratic Justin Santopietro 2,921 21.36
Total votes 13,677 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Morgan
Griffith (R)
Anthony
Flaccavento (D)
Other Undecided
Thirty-Ninth Street Strategies (D-Flaccavento) June 24–28, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 48% 41% 4% 7%

Results

Virginia's 9th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Morgan Griffith (incumbent) 160,933 65.2
Democratic Anthony Flaccavento 85,833 34.7
n/a Write-ins 214 0.1
Total votes 246,980 100.0
Republican hold

District 10

In the 10th district, six Democratic candidates, encouraged by the fact that Republican incumbent Barbara Comstock's district voted for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 U.S Presidential Election, submitted the required number of signatures to run for that seat.[50] Republicans believed, however, that given that Comstock was an excellent fundraiser and fierce campaigner, she would be able to keep the seat.[51] April polling was favorable to a generic Democrat against Comstock, although Comstock performed much better in polling when her name was on the ballot against a named Democratic opponent.[52]

Patriarchist libertarian Nathan Larson filed to run as an independent,[53] but then withdrew his candidacy on August 13 and endorsed Wexton, calling her "the accelerationist choice";[54] Wexton, through a spokesman, declined the endorsement.[55] Comstock tweeted, "It is good news for all voters in the 10th District that Nathan Larson, a convicted felon who served time in prison for threatening to kill the President and is an admitted pedophile, an admitted rapist, white supremacist, and misogynist, is now off the ballot in the 10th Congressional District."[56]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Results

Democratic primary results[63]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jennifer Wexton 22,405 41.89
Democratic Alison Friedman 12,283 22.96
Democratic Lindsey Davis Stover 8,567 16.02
Democratic Dan Helmer 6,712 12.55
Democratic Paul Pelletier 2,010 3.76
Democratic Julia Biggins 1,513 2.83
Total votes 53,490 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Results

Republican primary results[65]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Barbara Comstock (incumbent) 28,287 60.70
Republican Shak Hill 18,311 39.30
Total votes 46,598 100.0

General election

Debates

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Barbara
Comstock (R)
Jennifer
Wexton (D)
Other Undecided
Washington Post/Schar School October 25–28, 2018 446 ± 6.5% 43% 54% 1% 2%
Washington Post/Schar School October 15–21, 2018 430 ± 6.5% 43% 56% 1%
TargetPoint (R) October 14–16, 2018 421 47% 47%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 11–15, 2018 484 ± 4.8% 41% 48% 11%
Global Strategy Group (D) October 7–9, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 39% 49%
McLaughlin & Associates (R-Comstock) October 6–8, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 48% 47% 5%
Washington Post/Schar School September 19 – October 5, 2018 866 ± 4.0% 43% 55% 2%
Christopher Newport University September 23 – October 2, 2018 794 ± 4.1% 44% 51% 5%
Monmouth University September 26–30, 2018 374 ± 5.1% 44% 50% <1% 5%
Monmouth University June 21–24, 2018 338 LV ± 5.3% 41% 50% 3% 6%
400 RV ± 4.9% 39% 49% 2% 10%
DCCC (D) March 20–21, 2018 400 43% 46%

Results

Virginia's 10th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jennifer Wexton 206,356 56.1
Republican Barbara Comstock (incumbent) 160,841 43.7
n/a Write-ins 598 0.2
Total votes 367,795 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 11

In the 11th district, Democratic incumbent Gerry Connolly, who ran unopposed in 2016, faced no primary challengers. However, he faced Republican U.S. Army veteran Jeff Dove in the general election. Also running was Libertarian Stevan Porter.[66]

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Jeff Dove, veteran

General election

Results

Virginia's 11th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gerry Connolly (incumbent) 219,191 71.1
Republican Jeff Dove 83,023 26.9
Libertarian Stevan Porter 5,546 1.8
n/a Write-ins 506 0.2
Total votes 308,266 100.0
Democratic hold

See also

References

  1. ^ "Upcoming Elections". Virginia Department of Elections.
  2. ^ https://results.elections.virginia.gov/vaelections/2018%20November%20General/Site/Congress.html
  3. ^ Johnson, Cheryl L. (February 28, 2019). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 2018". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  4. ^ "US House of Representatives District 1". VPAP.
  5. ^ "2018 June Democratic Primary". Results.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  6. ^ "Endorsements". Vangieforcongress.com. Retrieved October 18, 2018.
  7. ^ "2018 Candidate Endorsements". cwfpac.com. 2018.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Official Results". 2018 November General. Virginia Department of Elections. November 9, 2018. Retrieved November 11, 2018.
  9. ^ Ress, Dave (February 23, 2018). "National Democrats pick their candidate for the 2nd Congressional district". Daily Press.
  10. ^ a b Geller, Laura (August 9, 2018). "Delegate says signatures were forged on Shaun Brown ballot petition". 13 News.
  11. ^ Tully-McManus, Katherine (August 7, 2018). "Special Prosecutor Appointed in Scott Taylor Campaign Forgery Case". Roll Call.
  12. ^ "Va. Democrats ask for Shaun Brown's removal from ballot". WVTR. August 9, 2018.
  13. ^ WAVY (August 13, 2018). "Virginia Democrats sue state elections board over Shaun Brown case".
  14. ^ Geller, Laura (August 9, 2018). "Virginia Democrats ask Herring to investigate petition fraud allegations". 13 News.
  15. ^ Wilson, Patrick (August 15, 2018). "More than 50 Virginia Beach sheriff's employees signed to get independent on congressional ballot". Richmond Times-Dispatch.
  16. ^ Dujardin, Peter (July 31, 2018). "Prosecutors cross-examine Shaun Brown for hours in federal fraud trial". Daily Press.
  17. ^ Green, Kevin (August 2, 2018). "Attorney: Mistrial declared in Shaun Brown's fraud trial". WAVY.
  18. ^ Dujardin, Peter (August 2, 2018). "Mistrial declared after jury deadlocks in Shaun Brown federal fraud trial". Daily Press.
  19. ^ Amin, Reema (September 14, 2018). "Virginia attorney general says it's too late for Shaun Brown to get name on ballot". Daily Press.
  20. ^ "2018 June Democratic Primary". Results.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  21. ^ Bartel, Bill (August 31, 2017). "Trump supporter from James City County challenging Rep. Scott Taylor in 2018 election". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  22. ^ "2018 June Republican Primary". Results.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved June 27, 2018.
  23. ^ Elaine Luria. "Thank you @RalphNortham for your leadership today as we work to create change for #VA02.  #TeamElaine". Twitter.
  24. ^ Justin Fairfax. "I am proud to endorse ⁦@ElaineLuriaVA⁩ for Congress in #VA02!  Please share and get out the vote for this crucial election on Nov. 6th!  #GOTV #NovemberIsComing #WeRiseTogether". Twitter.
  25. ^ "Endorsements". Elaine For Congress. October 18, 2018.
  26. ^ "US House of Representatives District 3". VPAP.
  27. ^ "US House of Representatives District 4". VPAP.
  28. ^ "2018 June Republican Primary". Results.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved June 27, 2018.
  29. ^ Martz, Michael (October 16, 2018). "Vice President Mike Pence to visit Richmond for McAdams campaign event on Saturday, 4th District hopeful says". Richmond Times-Dispatch.
  30. ^ Vozzella, Laura; Portnoy, Jenna (May 28, 2018). "Rep. Garrett announces he is an alcoholic and will not seek reelection". Retrieved June 6, 2018 – via www.washingtonpost.com.
  31. ^ "2018 Call to Convention". February 26, 2018. Retrieved September 12, 2018.
  32. ^ BRAGG, MICHAEL. "Democrat Roger Dean Huffstetler running against Garrett in 5th". dailyprogress.com. Retrieved December 19, 2017.
  33. ^ Hammel, Tyler (April 13, 2018). "Candidates expound on their desire to unseat Garrett". The Daily Progress.
  34. ^ WRABEL, ALLISON. "Riggleman selected as GOP nominee in 5th District". Retrieved September 12, 2018.
  35. ^ Wrabel, Allison (June 2, 2018). "Riggleman selected as GOP nominee in 5th District". The Daily Progress. Retrieved June 2, 2018.
  36. ^ Donald J. Trump. ".@Denver4VA of the 5th District in Virginia is a popular guy who really knows how to get the job done! Really big help with Tax Cuts, the Military and our great Vets. He has my Total Endorsement!". Twitter.
  37. ^ Forman, Carmen (November 9, 2017). "After nearly a quarter century in D.C., Rep. Bob Goodlatte of Roanoke County will not seek re-election". The Roanoke Times. Roanoke, VA. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  38. ^ Portnoy, Jenna (November 9, 2017). "Goodlatte of Virginia retiring from Congress after 13 terms". The Washington Post. Washington, DC. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  39. ^ "2018 June Democratic Primary". Results.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  40. ^ "US House of Representatives District 6". VPAP.
  41. ^ Champion, Allison Brophy (June 28, 2018). "Alli now running as write-in candidate in 7th District". Culpeper Star-Exponent.
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External links

Official campaign websites for first district candidates
Official campaign websites for second district candidates
Official campaign websites for third district candidates
Official campaign websites for fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites for fifth district candidates
Official campaign websites for sixth district candidates
Official campaign websites for seventh district candidates
Official campaign websites for eighth district candidates
Official campaign websites of ninth district candidates
Official campaign websites for tenth district candidates
Official campaign websites for eleventh district candidates
This page was last edited on 3 September 2019, at 18:40
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