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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 13 North Carolina seats to the United States House of Representatives
Turnout52.97%
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 10 3
Seats won 10 3
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,846,041 1,771,061
Percentage 50.39% 48.35%
Swing Decrease2.83% Increase1.75%

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina were held on November 6, 2018, electing the thirteen U.S. Representatives from the State of North Carolina, one from each of the state's congressional districts. The elections coincided with other elections to the House of Representatives, as well as elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

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Transcription

Contents

Results summary

Statewide

Party Candi-
dates
Votes Seats
No. % No. +/– %
Republican Party 13 1,845,921 50.39% 9 Steady 76.92%
Democratic Party 12 1,770,902 48.35% 3 Steady 23.08%
Libertarian Party 5 38,728 1.06% 0 Steady 0.00%
Constitution Party 2 7,496 0.20% 0 Steady 0.00%
Total 32 3,663,047 100.00% 13 Steady 100.00%
Popular vote
Republican
50.39%
Democratic
48.35%
Libertarian
1.06%
Constitution
0.20%
House seats
Republican
76.92%
Democratic
23.08%

District

Results of the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina by district:[1]

District Republican Democratic Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 82,218 30.15% 190,457 69.85% 0 0.00% 272,675 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 2 170,072 51.27% 151,977 45.82% 9,655 2.91% 331,704 100.00% Republican Hold
District 3 187,901 100.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 187,901 100.00% Republican Hold
District 4 82,052 24.03% 247,067 72.37% 12,284 3.60% 341,403 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 5 159,915 57.04% 120,462 42.96% 0 0.00% 280,377 100.00% Republican Hold
District 6 160,709 56.52% 123,651 43.48% 0 0.00% 284,360 100.00% Republican Hold
District 7 156,809 55.55% 120,838 42.80% 4,665 1.65% 282,312 100.00% Republican Hold
District 8 141,402 55.35% 114,119 44.65% 0 0.00% 255,521 100.00% Republican Hold
District 9 139,246 49.25% 138,341 48.93% 5,130 1.81% 282,717 100.00% Re-run Ordered[2][3]
District 10 164,969 59.29% 113,259 40.71% 0 0.00% 278,228 100.00% Republican Hold
District 11 178,012 59.21% 116,508 38.75% 6,146 2.04% 300,666 100.00% Republican Hold
District 12 75,164 26.93% 203,974 73.07% 0 0.00% 279,138 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 13 147,570 51.54% 130,402 45.54% 8,344 2.91% 286,316 100.00% Republican Hold
Total 1,706,795 50.49% 1,632,720 48.30% 46,224 1.37% 3,380,609 100.00%

District 1

The incumbent is Democrat G. K. Butterfield, who has represented the district since 2004. Butterfield was re-elected with 69% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Roger Allison[4]

General election

Results

North Carolina's 1st congressional district, 2018[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic G. K. Butterfield (incumbent) 190,457 69.9
Republican Roger Allison 82,218 30.2
Total votes 272,675 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

The incumbent is Republican George Holding, who has represented the district since 2017. Holding was elected with 57% of the vote in 2016.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee included North Carolina's 2nd congressional district on its initial list of Republican-held seats considered targets in 2018.[6][7]

Democratic primary

  • Linda Coleman, former State Representative and Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor in 2012 & 2016[8]
  • Wendy May, military veteran and former firefighter, minister and journalist[9]
  • Ken Romley, entrepreneur[10]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Linda Coleman 18,650 56.0
Democratic Ken Romley 10,742 32.3
Democratic Wendy May 3,895 11.7
Total votes 33,287 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George Holding (incumbent) 17,979 76.2
Republican Allen Chesser II 5,612 23.8
Total votes 23,591 100.0

Libertarian primary

  • Jeff Matemu

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
George
Holding (R)
Linda
Coleman (D)
Jeff
Matemu (L)
Undecided
SurveyUSA October 24—28, 2018 565 ± 4.5% 49% 40% 2% 9%
SurveyUSA September 5—8, 2018 538 ± 4.9% 43% 44% 2% 10%
GQR Research (D-Coleman) August 23—27, 2018 401 ± 4.9% 44% 45% 5% 6%

Results

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district, 2018[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George Holding (incumbent) 170,072 51.3
Democratic Linda Coleman 151,977 45.8
Libertarian Jeff Matemu 9,655 2.9
Total votes 331,704 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The incumbent is Republican Walter B. Jones Jr., who has represented the district since 1995. Jones was re-elected with 67% of the vote in 2016.

Republican primary

Endorsements

Scott Dacey

Primary results

Republican primary results[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Walter B. Jones, Jr. (incumbent) 20,963 43.0
Republican Phil Law 14,343 29.4
Republican Scott Dacey 13,421 27.5
Total votes 48,727 100.0

General election

Results

North Carolina's 3rd congressional district, 2018[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Walter B. Jones, Jr. (incumbent) 187,901 100.0
Total votes 187,901 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The incumbent is Democrat David Price, who has represented the district since 1997. Price was re-elected with 68% of the vote in 2016.[21]

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price (incumbent) 52,203 77.1
Democratic Michelle Laws 11,120 16.4
Democratic Richard Lee Watkins III 4,391 6.5
Total votes 67,714 100.0

Republican primary

Libertarian primary

  • Barbara Howe, homemaker
  • Scerry Whitlock

Primary results

Libertarian primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Barbara Howe 528 76.9
Libertarian Scerry Perry Whitlock 159 23.1
Total votes 687 100.0

General election

Results

North Carolina's 4th congressional district, 2018[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price (incumbent) 247,067 72.4
Republican Steve Loor 82,052 24.0
Libertarian Barbara Howe 12,284 3.6
Total votes 341,403 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5

The incumbent is Republican Virginia Foxx, who has represented the district since 2005. Foxx was re-elected with 58% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Denise D. Adams 15,509 54.4
Democratic Jenny Marshall 12,987 45.6
Total votes 28,496 100.0

Republican primary

  • Virginia Foxx, incumbent
  • Dillon Gentry, salesman[29]
  • Cortland J. Meader, doctor[30]
  • Matthew Vera, high school coach

Primary results

Republican primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 32,654 80.8
Republican Dillon Gentry 5,703 14.1
Republican Cortland J. Meader 2,063 5.1
Total votes 40,420 100.0

General election

Results

North Carolina's 5th congressional district, 2018[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 159,917 57.0
Democratic Denise D. Adams 120,468 43.0
Total votes 280,385 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The incumbent is Republican Mark Walker, who has represented the district since 2015. Walker was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ryan Watts 26,072 77.2
Democratic Gerald Wong 7,719 22.8
Total votes 33,791 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Results

North Carolina's 6th congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Walker (incumbent) 160,709 56.5
Democratic Ryan Watts 123,651 43.5
Total votes 284,360 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The incumbent is Republican David Rouzer, who has represented the district since 2015. Rouzer was re-elected with 61% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • Kyle Horton, physician[37]
  • Grayson Parker, consultant

Primary results

Democratic primary results[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kyle Horton 21,499 67.0
Democratic Grayson Parker 10,587 33.0
Total votes 32,086 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Kyle
Horton (D)
David
Rouzer (R)
Other Undecided
Lincoln Park Strategies (D-Horton) August 18—22, 2018 500 ± 4.4% 40% 38% 3%[39] 19%

Results

North Carolina's 7th congressional district, 2018[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Rouzer (incumbent) 156,809 55.5
Democratic Kyle Horton 120,838 42.8
Constitution David Fallin 4,665 1.7
Total votes 282,312 100.0
Republican hold

District 8

The incumbent is Republican Richard Hudson, who has represented the district since 2013. Hudson was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2016.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee included North Carolina's 8th congressional district on its initial list of Republican-held seats considered targets in 2018.

Democratic primary

  • Scott Huffman, small business owner[41]
  • Frank McNeill, former mayor of Aberdeen[42]
  • Marc Tiegel, businessman

Primary results

Democratic primary results[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank McNeill 16,019 56.0
Democratic Scott Huffman 6,581 23.0
Democratic Marc Tiegel 5,997 21.0
Total votes 28,597 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Results

North Carolina's 8th congressional district, 2018[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Hudson (incumbent) 141,402 55.3
Democratic Frank McNeill 114,119 44.7
Total votes 255,521 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The incumbent, Republican Robert Pittenger, lost his party's nomination to Mark Harris. Pittenger had represented the district since 2013 and had been re-elected with 58% of the vote in the general election of 2016.

The results of the election were voided and the seat remained vacant until a special election was held in 2019.

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan McCready 38,098 82.8
Democratic Christian Cano 7,922 17.2
Total votes 46,020 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Harris 17,302 48.5
Republican Robert Pittenger (incumbent) 16,474 46.2
Republican Clarence Goins 1,867 5.2
Total votes 35,643 100.0

Libertarian primary

  • Jeff Scott

General election

Debates

Endorsements

Mark Harris (R)
Federal officials
Jeff Scott (L)
Federal officials
  • Christian Cano, 2016 Democratic candidate for North Carolina's 9th congressional district[52]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Mark
Harris (R)
Dan
McCready (D)
Jeff
Scott (L)
Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 26—30, 2018 505 ± 5.0% 45% 44% 3% 7%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 1—5, 2018 502 ± 4.9% 47% 42% 11%
SurveyUSA October 2—4, 2018 556 ± 4.7% 41% 45% 3% 12%
SurveyUSA July 5—8, 2018 600 ± 4.6% 36% 43% 3% 19%
ALG Research (D) March 8—13, 2018 500 ± 4.4% 43% 44% 13%

Results

North Carolina's 9th congressional district, 2018[53]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Harris 139,246 49.25
Democratic Dan McCready 138,341 48.93
Libertarian Jeff Scott 5,130 1.81
Total votes 282,717 100.0

On November 27, 2018, the State Board of Elections declined to certify the election result in this congressional district, while certifying all the others, pending investigation of unspecified "potential wrongdoing".[54] An investigation was opened focusing on McCrae Dowless, a political operative who was hired by the Harris campaign for get-out-the-vote work, and allegations of irregularities involving the collection of absentee ballots.[55][56] On December 28, 2018, incoming House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer stated House Democrats' official position of declining to seat Harris on January 3.[57] A new election was called.

District 10

The incumbent is Republican Patrick McHenry, who has represented the district since 2005. McHenry was re-elected with 63% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • David Wilson Brown, IT consultant[58]

Republican primary

  • Seth Blankenship
  • Gina Collias, attorney[59]
  • Jeff Gregory
  • Patrick McHenry, incumbent
  • Ira Roberts[60]
  • Albert Wiley, Jr., physician and professor[61]

Primary results

Republican primary results[62]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Patrick McHenry (incumbent) 34,173 70.7
Republican Gina Collias 6,664 13.8
Republican Jeff Gregory 3,724 7.7
Republican Ira Roberts 1,701 3.5
Republican Seth Blankenship 1,443 3.0
Republican Albert Wiley, Jr. 616 1.3
Total votes 48,321 100.0

General election

Results

North Carolina's 10th congressional district, 2018[63]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Patrick McHenry (incumbent) 164,969 59.3
Democratic David Wilson Brown 113,259 40.7
Total votes 278,228 100.0
Republican hold

District 11

The incumbent is Republican Mark Meadows, who has represented the district since 2013. Meadows was re-elected with 64% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • Scott Donaldson, urologist[64]
  • Phillip Price, business owner[65]
  • Steve Woodsmall, former U.S. Air Force officer[66]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[67]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Phillip Price 13,499 40.6
Democratic Steve Woodsmall 10,356 31.1
Democratic Scott Donaldson 9,402 28.3
Total votes 33,257 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[69]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Meadows (incumbent) 35,665 86.4
Republican Chuck Archerd 5,639 13.6
Total votes 41,304 100.0

Libertarian primary

  • Clifton Ingram

General election

Results

North Carolina's 11th congressional district, 2018[70]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Meadows (incumbent) 178,012 59.2
Democratic Phillip Price 116,508 38.8
Libertarian Clifton Ingram 6,146 2.0
Total votes 300,666 100.0
Republican hold

District 12

The incumbent is Democrat Alma Adams, who has represented the district since 2014. Adams was re-elected with 67% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • Alma Adams, incumbent
  • Gabe Ortiz[71]
  • Patrick Register, food service worker[72]
  • Keith Young, Asheville city councilman[73]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[74]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alma Adams (incumbent) 38,849 85.5
Democratic Keith Young 2,549 5.6
Democratic Patrick Register 2,074 4.6
Democratic Gabe Ortiz 1,959 4.3
Total votes 45,431 100.0

Republican primary

  • Paul Bonham
  • Carl Persson[75]
  • Paul Wright, retired judge and attorney[76]

Primary results

Republican primary results[77]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Wright 3,221 43.2
Republican Paul Bonham 2,349 31.5
Republican Carl Persson 1,885 25.3
Total votes 7,455 100.0

General election

Results

North Carolina's 12th congressional district, 2018[78]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alma Adams (incumbent) 203,974 73.1
Republican Paul Wright 75,164 26.9
Total votes 279,138 100.0
Democratic hold

District 13

The incumbent is Republican Ted Budd, who has represented the district since 2017. Budd was elected with 56% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • Adam Coker, trucker[79]
  • Kathy Manning, attorney[80]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[81]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathy Manning 19,554 70.1
Democratic Adam Coker 8,324 29.9
Total votes 27,878 100.0

Republican primary

Libertarian primary

  • Tom Bailey

General election

Endorsements

Ted Budd (R)
Federal officials

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Ted
Budd (R)
Kathy
Manning (D)
Other Undecided
Change Research (D) November 2–4, 2018 567 43% 43% 3%[82] 12%
SurveyUSA October 9–12, 2018 533 ± 5.2% 44% 41% 2%[83] 13%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 3–8, 2018 500 ± 4.9% 47% 41% 12%
DCCC (D) September 13, 2018 537 ± 4.2% 42% 46%
SurveyUSA July 12–16, 2018 537 ± 4.7% 40% 35% 6%[84] 19%
Public Policy Polling (D) April 16–17, 2018 668 ± 3.8% 43% 40% 17%

Results

North Carolina's 13th congressional district, 2018[85]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Budd (incumbent) 147,570 51.5
Democratic Kathy Manning 130,402 45.6
Libertarian Tom Bailey 5,513 1.9
Green Robert Corriher 2,831 1.0
Total votes 286,316 100.0
Republican hold

Controversies

References

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  82. ^ Tom Bailey (L) with 2%; Robert Corriher (G) with 1%
  83. ^ Tom Bailey (L) with 1%; Robert Corriher (G) with 1%
  84. ^ 3% Tom Bailey (L); 3% Robert Corriher (G)
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External links

Official campaign websites for first district candidates
Official campaign websites for second district candidates
Official campaign websites for third district candidates
Official campaign websites for fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites for fifth district candidates
Official campaign websites for sixth district candidates
Official campaign websites for seventh district candidates
Official campaign websites for eighth district candidates
Official campaign websites for ninth district candidates
Official campaign websites for tenth district candidates
Official campaign websites for eleventh district candidates
Official campaign websites for twelfth district candidates
Official campaign websites for thirteenth district candidates
This page was last edited on 11 September 2019, at 17:44
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