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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in New York

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in New York

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 27 New York seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 18 9
Seats won 21 6
Seat change Increase 3 Decrease 3
Popular vote 3,990,483 1,855,147
Percentage 67.16% 31.22%
Swing Increase4.35% Decrease4.37%

United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2018 results by district.svg
Popular vote by congressional district. As this is a first-past-the-post election, seat totals are not determined by total popular vote in the state, but instead by results in each congressional district.

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in New York were held November 6, 2018 to elect a U.S. Representative from each of New York's 27 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the gubernatorial election, as well as an election to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. Contested primaries were held June 26, 2018. On Election Day, Democrats gained three New York House seats, and the Democratic Party retook control of the House of Representatives. Democrats won a total of 21 New York House seats, while Republicans won six.

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Transcription

Hi, I'm Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we're going to talk about what is, if you ask the general public, the most important part of politics: elections. If you ask me, it's hair styles. Look at Martin Van Buren's sideburns, how could he not be elected? Americans are kind of obsessed with elections, I mean when this was being recorded in early 2015, television, news and the internet were already talking about who would be Democrat and Republican candidates for president in 2016. And many of the candidates have unofficially been campaigning for years. I've been campaigning; your grandma's been campaigning. Presidential elections are exciting and you can gamble on them. Is that legal, can you gamble on them, Stan? Anyway, why we're so obsessed with them is a topic for another day. Right now I'm gonna tell you that the fixation on the presidential elections is wrong, but not because the president doesn't matter. No, today we're gonna look at the elections of the people that are supposed to matter the most, Congress. Constitutionally at least, Congress is the most important branch of government because it is the one that is supposed to be the most responsive to the people. One of the main reasons it's so responsive, at least in theory, is the frequency of elections. If a politician has to run for office often, he or she, because unlike the president we have women serving in Congress, kind of has to pay attention to what the constituents want, a little bit, maybe. By now, I'm sure that most of you have memorized the Constitution, so you recognize that despite their importance in the way we discuss politics, elections aren't really a big feature of the Constitution. Except of course for the ridiculously complex electoral college system for choosing the president, which we don't even want to think about for a few episodes. In fact, here's what the Constitution says about Congressional Elections in Article 1 Section 2: "The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature." So the Constitution does establish that the whole of the house is up for election every 2 years, and 1/3 of the senate is too, but mainly it leaves the scheduling and rules of elections up to the states. The actual rules of elections, like when the polls are open and where they actually are, as well as the registration requirements, are pretty much up to the states, subject to some federal election law. If you really want to know the rules in your state, I'm sure that someone at the Board of Elections, will be happy to explain them to you. Really, you should give them a call; they're very, very lonely. In general though, here's what we can say about American elections. First stating the super obvious, in order to serve in congress, you need to win an election. In the House of Representatives, each election district chooses a single representative, which is why we call them single-member districts. The number of districts is determined by the Census, which happens every 10 years, and which means that elections ending in zeros are super important, for reasons that I'll explain in greater detail in a future episode. It's because of gerrymandering. The Senate is much easier to figure out because both of the state Senators are elected by the entire state. It's as if the state itself were a single district, which is true for states like Wyoming, which are so unpopulated as to have only 1 representative. Sometimes these elections are called at large elections. Before the election ever happens, you need candidates. How candidates are chosen differs from state to state, but usually it has something to do with political parties, although it doesn't have to. Why are things so complicated?! What we can say is that candidates, or at least good candidates, usually have certain characteristics. Sorry America. First off, if you are gonna run for office, you should have an unblemished record, free of, oh I don't know, felony convictions or sex scandals, except maybe in Louisiana or New York. This might lead to some pretty bland candidates or people who are so calculating that they have no skeletons in their closet, but we Americans are a moral people and like our candidates to reflect our ideals rather than our reality. The second characteristic that a candidate must possess is the ability to raise money. Now some candidates are billionaires and can finance their own campaigns. But most billionaires have better things to do: buying yachts, making even more money, building money forts, buying more yachts, so they don't have time to run for office. But most candidates get their money for their campaigns by asking for it. The ability to raise money is key, especially now, because running for office is expensive. Can I get a how expensive is it? "How expensive is it?!" Well, so expensive that the prices of elections continually rises and in 2012 winners of House races spent nearly 2 million each. Senate winners spent more than 10 million. By the time this episode airs, I'm sure the numbers will be much higher like a gajillion billion million. Money is important in winning an election, but even more important, statistically, is already being in Congress. Let's go to the Thought Bubble. The person holding an office who runs for that office again is called the incumbent and has a big advantage over any challenger. This is according to political scientists who, being almost as bad at naming things as historians, refer to this as incumbency advantage. There are a number of reasons why incumbents tend to hold onto their seats in congress, if they want to. The first is that a sitting congressman has a record to run on, which we hope includes some legislative accomplishments, although for the past few Congresses, these don't seem to matter. The record might include case work, which is providing direct services to constituents. This is usually done by congressional staffers and includes things like answering questions about how to get certain government benefits or writing recommendation letters to West Point. Congressmen can also provide jobs to constituents, which is usually a good way to get them to vote for you. These are either government jobs, kind of rare these days, called patronage or indirect employment through government contracts for programs within a Congressman's district. These programs are called earmarks or pork barrel programs, and they are much less common now because Congress has decided not to use them any more, sort of. The second advantage that incumbents have is that they have a record of winning elections, which if you think about it, is pretty obvious. Being a proven winner makes it easier for a congressmen to raise money, which helps them win, and long term incumbents tend to be more powerful in Congress which makes it even easier for them to raise money and win. The Constitution give incumbents one structural advantage too. Each elected congressman is allowed $100,000 and free postage to send out election materials. This is called the franking privilege. It's not so clear how great an advantage this is in the age of the internet, but at least according to the book The Victory Lab, direct mail from candidates can be surprisingly effective. How real is this incumbency advantage? Well if you look at the numbers, it seems pretty darn real. Over the past 60 years, almost 90% of members of The House of Representatives got re-elected. The Senate has been even more volatile, but even at the low point in 1980 more than 50% of sitting senators got to keep their jobs. Thanks, Thought Bubble. You're so great. So those are some of the features of congressional elections. Now, if you'll permit me to get a little politically sciencey, I'd like to try to explain why elections are so important to the way that Congressmen and Senators do their jobs. In 1974, political scientist David Mayhew published a book in which he described something he called "The Electoral Connection." This was the idea that Congressmen were primarily motivated by the desire to get re-elected, which intuitively makes a lot of sense, even though I'm not sure what evidence he had for this conclusion. Used to be able to get away with that kind of thing I guess, clearly David may-not-hew to the rules of evidence, pun [rim shot], high five, no. Anyway Mayhew's research methodology isn't as important as his idea itself because The Electoral Connection provides a frame work for understanding congressman's activities. Mayhew divided representatives' behaviors and activities into three categories. The first is advertising; congressmen work to develop their personal brand so that they are recognizable to voters. Al D'Amato used to be know in New York as Senator Pothole, because he was able to bring home so much pork that he could actually fix New York's streets. Not by filling them with pork, money, its money, remember pork barrel spending? The second activity is credit claiming; Congressmen get things done so that they can say they got them done. A lot of case work and especially pork barrel spending are done in the name of credit claiming. Related to credit claiming, but slightly different, is position taking. This means making a public judgmental statement on something likely to be of interest to voters. Senators can do this through filibusters. Representatives can't filibuster, but they can hold hearings, publicly supporting a hearing is a way of associating yourself with an idea without having to actually try to pass legislation. And of course they can go on the TV, especially on Sunday talk shows. What's a TV, who even watches TV? Now the idea of The Electoral Connection doesn't explain every action a member of Congress takes; sometimes they actually make laws to benefit the public good or maybe solve problems, huh, what an idea! But Mayhew's idea gives us a way of thinking about Congressional activity, an analytical lens that connects what Congressmen actually do with how most of us understand Congressmen, through elections. So the next time you see a Congressmen call for a hearing on a supposed horrible scandal or read about a Senator threatening to filibuster a policy that may have significant popular support, ask yourself, "Is this Representative claiming credit or taking a position, and how will this build their brand?" In other words: what's the electoral connection and how will whatever they're doing help them get elected? This might feel a little cynical, but the reality is Mayhew's thesis often seems to fit with today's politics. Thanks for watching, see you next week. Vote for me; I'm on the TV. I'm not -- I'm on the YouTube. Crash Course: Government and Politics is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios. Support for Crash Course US Government comes from Voqal. Voqal supports nonprofits that use technology and media to advance social equity. Learn more about their mission and initiatives at Voqal.org. Crash Course is made by all of these nice people. Thanks for watching. That guy isn't nice.

Contents

Overview

Elections were held in all 27 of New York's congressional districts in 2018. Prior to the 2018 elections, one New York House seat was vacant[1] due to the death of Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-25th District) on March 16, 2018.[2] In the June 26, 2018 Democratic primary in District 14, insurgent Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez upset longtime incumbent Rep. Joe Crowley.[3] On November 6, 2018, the Democratic Party held the open seat in District 25 and defeated three Republican incumbents; with the exception of Crowley, all Democratic incumbent members of Congress in New York were re-elected.[4][5] The defeated Republican incumbents were Rep. Dan Donovan (R-11th District) (defeated by Democrat Max Rose), Rep. John Faso (R-19th District) (defeated by Democrat Antonio Delgado), and Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-22nd District) (defeated by Democrat Anthony Brindisi.[4] Incumbent Rep. Chris Collins (R-27th District) was narrowly re-elected[6] despite having been arrested on insider trading charges in August 2018.[7]

Democrats won a total of 21 New York House seats, while Republicans won six.[4] Nationally, the Democratic Party won control of the House of Representatives on Election Day.[8]

United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 2018
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 3,760,566 63.30% 21
Republican 1,639,593 27.60% 6
Conservative 207,094 3.49% 0
Working Families 176,483 2.97% 0
Reform 44,931 0.76% 0
Independence 44,722 0.75% 0
Women's Equality 41,317 0.70% 0
Independent 2,835 0.05% 0
Totals 7,116,424 100.00% 27

District 1

The 1st district is located in eastern Long Island and includes most of central and eastern Suffolk County. The incumbent was Republican Lee Zeldin, who had represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 58% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

New York's 1st district was included on the initial list of Republican-held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[9]

Candidates

Declared
Withdrew
Declined

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Perry Gershon 7,902 35.5
Democratic Kate Browning 6,813 30.6
Democratic Vivian Viloria-Fisher 3,616 16.3
Democratic David Pechefsky 2,565 11.5
Democratic Elaine DiMasi 1,344 6.0
Total votes 22,240 100.0

Republican primary

General election

In mid-September, Gershon said his campaign had raised more than $1.25 million since July 1, with contributions averaging $85.[23] At the end of September, the nonpartisan Washington, D.C.-based Cook Political Report rated the race as "Likely Republican;" the "Likely" designation is for seats "not considered competitive at this point, but hav[ing] the potential to become engaged."[24]

Endorsements

Lee Zeldin (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Lee
Zeldin (R)
Perry
Gershon (D)
Undecided
Change Research (D) October 27–29, 2018 838 52% 37%
GBA Strategies (D-Gershon) October 8–10, 2018 500 ± 4.4% 50% 46%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 4–8, 2018 502 ± 4.6% 49% 41% 10%
Global Strategy Group (D) September 11–17, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 47% 44%

Results

New York's 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lee Zeldin 121,562 45.0
Conservative Lee Zeldin 14,284 5.3
Independence Lee Zeldin 2,693 1.0
Reform Lee Zeldin 488 0.2
Total Lee Zeldin (incumbent) 139,027 51.5
Democratic Perry Gershon 124,213 46.0
Working Families Perry Gershon 3,778 1.4
Total Perry Gershon 127,991 47.4
Women's Equality Kate Browning 2,988 1.1
Total votes 270,006 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

The 2nd district is based along the South Shore of Long Island and includes southwestern Suffolk County and a small portion of southeastern Nassau County. The incumbent was Republican Peter T. King, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 3rd district from 1993 to 2013. He was re-elected to a thirteenth term with 62% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Liuba Grechen Shirley 7,315 57.3
Democratic DuWayne Gregory 5,456 42.7
Total votes 12,771 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Endorsements

Peter King (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials

Results

New York's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Peter T. King 112,565 46.7
Conservative Peter T. King 12,504 5.2
Independence Peter T. King 2,535 1.0
Reform Peter T. King 474 0.2
Total Peter T. King (incumbent) 128,078 53.1
Democratic Liuba Grechen Shirley 108,803 45.1
Working Families Liuba Grechen Shirley 2,799 1.2
Women's Equality Liuba Grechen Shirley 1,472 0.6
Total Liuba Grechen Shirley 113,074 46.9
Total votes 241,152 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The 3rd district includes most of the North Shore of Long Island. It covers northwestern Suffolk County, northern Nassau County, and northeastern Queens. The incumbent was Democrat Tom Suozzi, who had represented the district since 2017. He was elected to replace retiring Representative Steve Israel with 53% of the vote in 2016. New York's 3rd district was included on the initial list of Democrat-held seats being targeted by the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2018.[27]

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Dan DeBono, investment banker

General election

Results

New York's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Suozzi 149,937 56.2
Independence Tom Suozzi 2,962 1.1
Working Families Tom Suozzi 2,838 1.1
Women's Equality Tom Suozzi 1,376 0.5
Reform Tom Suozzi 343 0.1
Total Tom Suozzi (incumbent) 157,456 59.0
Republican Dan DeBono 98,716 37.0
Conservative Dan DeBono 10,798 4.0
Total Dan DeBono 109,514 41.0
Total votes 266,970 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4

The 4th district is located in central and southern Nassau County. The incumbent was Democrat Kathleen Rice, who had represented the district since 2015. She was re-elected to a second term with 59.5% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Ameer Benno, attorney

General election

Results

New York's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathleen Rice 156,728 60.2
Women's Equality Kathleen Rice 2,807 1.1
Total Kathleen Rice (incumbent) 159,535 61.3
Republican Ameer Benno 90,306 34.7
Conservative Ameer Benno 9,709 3.7
Reform Ameer Benno 556 0.2
Total Ameer Benno 100,571 38.7
Total votes 260,106 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5

The 5th district is mostly located within Queens in New York City, but also includes a small portion of Nassau County. The incumbent was Democrat Gregory Meeks, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 6th district from 1998 to 2013. He was re-elected to a tenth term with 85% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 11,060 81.6
Democratic Carl Achille 1,288 9.5
Democratic Mizan Choudhury 1,200 8.9
Total votes 13,548 100.0

General election

Results

New York's 5th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 160,500 100.0
Total votes 160,500 100.0
Democratic hold

District 6

The 6th district is located entirely within Queens in New York City. The incumbent was Democrat Grace Meng, who had represented the district since 2013. She was re-elected to a third term with 72% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

General election

Results

New York's 6th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Grace Meng 104,293 84.9
Working Families Grace Meng 6,429 5.2
Reform Grace Meng 924 0.8
Total Grace Meng (incumbent) 111,646 90.9
Green Thomas Hillgardner 11,209 9.1
Total votes 122,855 100.0
Democratic hold

District 7

The 7th district is located entirely in New York City and includes parts of Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. The incumbent was Democrat Nydia Velázquez, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 12th district from 1993 to 2013. She was re-elected to a thirteenth term with 91% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

General election

Results

New York's 7th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nydia Velázquez 134,125 85.4
Working Families Nydia Velázquez 12,562 8.0
Total Nydia Velázquez (incumbent) 146,687 93.4
Conservative Joseph Lieberman 8,670 5.5
Reform Jeffrey Kurzon 1,740 1.1
Total votes 157,097 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8

The 8th district is located entirely in the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. The incumbent was Democrat Hakeem Jeffries, who had represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected to a third term with 93% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Results

General election

Results

New York's 8th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hakeem Jeffries 170,850 89.3
Working Families Hakeem Jeffries 9,526 5.0
Total Hakeem Jeffries (incumbent) 180,376 94.3
Conservative Ernest Johnson 9,997 5.2
Reform Jessica White 1,031 0.5
Total votes 191,404 100.0
Democratic hold

District 9

The 9th district is located entirely within the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The incumbent was Democrat Yvette Clarke, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 11th district from 2007 to 2013. She was re-elected to a sixth term with 92% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Yvette Clarke (incumbent) 16,202 53.0
Democratic Adem Bunkeddeko 14,350 47.0
Total votes 30,552 100.0

Republican primary

  • Lutchi Gayot, businessman

General election

Results

New York's 9th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Yvette Clarke 167,269 82.3
Working Families Yvette Clarke 14,186 7.0
Total Yvette Clarke (incumbent) 181,455 89.3
Republican Lutchi Gayot 18,702 9.2
Conservative Lutchi Gayot 2,199 1.1
Total Lutchi Gayot 20,901 10.3
Reform Joel Anabilah-Azumah 779 0.4
Total votes 203,135 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

The 10th district is located in New York City and includes the Upper West Side of Manhattan; the west side of Lower Manhattan, including Greenwich Village and the Financial District; and parts of Brooklyn, including Borough Park. The incumbent was Democrat Jerrold Nadler, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 8th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 17th district from 1992 to 1993. He was re-elected to a thirteenth full term with 78% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Naomi Levin, software engineer

General election

Results

New York's 10th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerrold Nadler 162,131 76.9
Working Families Jerrold Nadler 10,964 5.2
Total Jerrold Nadler (incumbent) 173,095 82.1
Republican Naomi Levin 33,692 16.0
Conservative Naomi Levin 3,259 1.6
Reform Naomi Levin 668 0.3
Total Naomi Levin 37,619 17.9
Total votes 210,714 100.0
Democratic hold

District 11

The 11th district is located entirely in New York City and includes all of Staten Island and parts of southern Brooklyn. The incumbent was Republican Dan Donovan, who had represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 62% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

New York's 11th district was included on the initial list of Republican-held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[9]

Candidates

Declared
  • Michael DeVito, retired Marine Staff Sergeant[30]
  • Zach Emig, bond trader[30]
  • Max Rose, army veteran and chief of staff at Brightpoint Health[31]
  • Paul Sperling, millennial entrepreneur & native Staten Islander [32]
Withdrew
  • Boyd Melson, retired boxer and Army Reserves Captain[33][34]
  • Mike DeCillis, teacher and retired police officer (endorsed Michael DeVito)[35][36]

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Max Rose 11,539 63.3
Democratic Michael DeVito Jr. 3,642 20.0
Democratic Omar Vaid 1,589 8.7
Democratic Radhakrishna Mohan 719 4.0
Democratic Paul Sperling 486 2.7
Democratic Zach Emig 249 1.4
Total votes 18,224 100.0

Republican primary

Former Congressman Michael Grimm, who resigned in 2014 after pleading guilty to federal tax fraud charges for which he served eight months in prison, challenged Donovan in the primary.[37][38]

Endorsements

Dan Donovan
U.S. Executive Branch officials

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dan
Donovan (R)
Michael
Grimm (R)
Other Undecided
Remington Research (R) June 20–21, 2018 703 ± 3.7% 47% 40% 13%
Siena College May 29–June 3, 2018 513 ± 4.3% 37% 47% 16%

Results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Donovan (incumbent) 13,515 62.9
Republican Michael Grimm 7,957 37.1
Total votes 21,472 100.0

Conservative primary

Dan Donovan, the incumbent Congressman, also ran in the primary for the Conservative Party of New York State.

Results

Conservative primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative Dan Donovan (incumbent) 610 55.0
Conservative Michael Grimm 497 44.7
Conservative Max Rose 3 0.3
Total votes 1,110 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dan
Donovan (R)
Max
Rose (D)
Henry
Bardel (G)
Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 23–27, 2018 495 ± 4.7% 44% 40% 1% 15%
Public Policy Polling (D) September 4–5, 2018 509 47% 39% 14%

Results

New York's 11th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Max Rose 96,850 50.4
Working Families Max Rose 3,894 2.0
Women's Equality Max Rose 1,079 0.6
Total Max Rose 101,823 53.0
Republican Dan Donovan 80,440 41.9
Conservative Dan Donovan 7,352 3.8
Independence Dan Donovan 1,302 0.7
Reform Dan Donovan 347 0.2
Total Dan Donovan (incumbent) 89,441 46.6
Green Henry Bardel 774 0.4
Total votes 192,038 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 12

The 12th district is located entirely in New York City and includes several neighborhoods in the East Side of Manhattan, Greenpoint and western Queens. The incumbent was Democrat Carolyn Maloney, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 14th district from 1993 to 2013. She was re-elected to a thirteenth term with 83% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 26,742 59.6
Democratic Suraj Patel 18,098 40.4
Total votes 44,840 100.0

Republican primary

  • Eliot Rabin, businessman

General election

Results

New York's 12th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carolyn Maloney 205,858 81.8
Working Families Carolyn Maloney 10,972 4.4
Reform Carolyn Maloney 600 0.2
Total Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 217,430 86.4
Republican Eliot Rabin 30,446 12.1
Green Scott Hutchins 3,728 1.5
Total votes 251,604 100.0
Democratic hold

District 13

The 13th district is located entirely in New York City and includes Upper Manhattan and a small portion of the western Bronx. The incumbent was Democrat Adriano Espaillat, who had represented the district since 2017. He was elected to replace retiring Representative Charles Rangel with 89% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Jineea Butler, "hip hop" analyst

General election

Results

New York's 13th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adriano Espaillat 171,341 90.0
Working Families Adriano Espaillat 8,694 4.6
Total Adriano Espaillat (incumbent) 180,035 94.6
Republican Jineea Butler 9,535 5.0
Reform Jineea Butler 733 0.4
Total Jineea Butler 10,268 5.4
Total votes 190,303 100.0
Democratic hold

District 14

The 14th district is located in New York City and includes the eastern Bronx and part of north-central Queens. The incumbent was Democrat Joseph Crowley, a leader of the New Democrat Coalition, who had represented the district since 2013. Crowley previously represented the 7th district from 1999 to 2013. He was re-elected to a tenth term with 83% of the vote in 2016. Crowley, who had been named as a potential successor to Nancy Pelosi as House Leader or Speaker, sought re-election in 2018.[40]

Backed by the organization Brand New Congress, Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez challenged Crowley in the June primary.[41] Ocasio-Cortez was an organizer in Bernie Sanders' 2016 presidential campaign. She alleged that Crowley was not progressive enough for the district.[42] She defeated Crowley in the Democratic primary election. However, Crowley remained on the ballot on the Working Families Party line.

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez 16,898 56.7
Democratic Joseph Crowley (incumbent) 12,880 43.3
Total votes 29,778 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Endorsements

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D)
U.S Presidents
U.S. Representatives
Local-level officials
Political candidates
Individuals
Labor unions
Organizations
Joseph Crowley (WF)
U.S. Senators (former)

Results[72]

New York's 14th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez 110,318 78.2
Republican Anthony Pappas 19,202 13.6
Working Families Joseph Crowley 8,075 5.7
Women's Equality Joseph Crowley 1,273 0.9
Total Joseph Crowley (incumbent) 9,348 6.6
Conservative Elizabeth Perri 2,254 1.6
Total votes 141,122 100.0
Democratic hold

District 15

The 15th district is located entirely within The Bronx in New York City and is one of the smallest districts by area in the entire country. The incumbent was Democrat José E. Serrano, who had represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 16th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 18th district from 1990 to 1993. He was re-elected to a fourteenth full term with 95% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Jason Gonzalez

General election

Results

New York's 15th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic José Serrano 122,007 94.1
Working Families José Serrano 2,462 1.9
Total José Serrano (incumbent) 124,469 96.0
Republican Jason Gonzalez 4,566 3.5
Conservative Jason Gonzalez 639 0.5
Total Jason Gonzalez 5,205 4.0
Total votes 129,674 100.0
Democratic hold

District 16

The 16th district is located in the northern part of The Bronx and the southern half of Westchester County, including the cities of Mount Vernon, Yonkers and Rye. The incumbent was Democrat Eliot Engel, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 17th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 19th district from 1989 to 1993. He was re-elected to a fifteenth term with 95% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eliot Engel (incumbent) 22,160 73.7
Democratic Jonathan Lewis 4,866 16.2
Democratic Joyce Briscoe 1,772 5.9
Democratic Derickson Lawrence 1,280 4.2
Total votes 30,078 100.0

General election

Results

New York's 16th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eliot Engel 172,815 94.9
Working Families Eliot Engel 6,755 3.7
Women's Equality Eliot Engel 2,474 1.4
Total Eliot Engel (incumbent) 182,044 100.0
Total votes 182,044 100.0
Democratic hold

District 17

The 17th district contains all of Rockland County and the northern and central portions of Westchester County, including the cities of Peekskill and White Plains. The incumbent was Democrat Nita Lowey, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 18th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 20th district from 1989 to 1993. She was re-elected to a fifteenth term unopposed in 2016.

Democratic primary

General election

Results

New York's 17th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nita Lowey 159,923 82.7
Working Families Nita Lowey 7,336 3.8
Women's Equality Nita Lowey 2,909 1.5
Total Nita Lowey (incumbent) 170,168 88.0
Reform Joseph Ciardullo 23,150 12.0
Total votes 193,318 100.0
Democratic hold

District 18

The 18th district is located entirely within the Hudson Valley, covering all of Orange County and Putnam County, as well as parts of southern Dutchess County and northeastern Westchester County. The incumbent was Democrat Sean Patrick Maloney, who had represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected to a third term with 56% of the vote in 2016.

New York's 18th district has been included on the initial list of Democratic held seats being targeted by the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2018.[27]

Democratic primary

Republican primary

General election

Debates

Results

New York's 18th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sean Patrick Maloney 126,368 50.2
Independence Sean Patrick Maloney 7,726 3.1
Working Families Sean Patrick Maloney 3,929 1.6
Women's Equality Sean Patrick Maloney 1,541 0.6
Total Sean Patrick Maloney (incumbent) 139,564 55.5
Republican James O'Donnell 96,345 38.3
Conservative James O'Donnell 14,484 5.7
Reform James O'Donnell 1,206 0.5
Total James O'Donnell 112,035 44.5
Total votes 251,599 100.0
Democratic hold

District 19

The 19th district is located in New York's Hudson Valley and Catskills regions and includes all of Columbia, Delaware, Greene, Otsego, Schoharie, Sullivan and Ulster counties, and parts of Broome, Dutchess, Montgomery and Rensselaer counties. The incumbent was Republican John Faso, who had represented the district since 2017. He was elected to replace retiring Representative Chris Gibson with 54% of the vote in 2016. The Democratic nominee was Antonio Delgado. Actress Diane Neal ran under the newly created Friends of Diane Neal ballot line.[74]

Democratic primary

New York's 19th district was included on the initial list of Republican-held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[9]

Candidates

Declared
  • Jeff Beals, teacher and former U.S. diplomat[75]
  • David Clegg, lawyer
  • Antonio Delgado, attorney[76]
  • Brian Flynn, businessman[77]
  • Pat Ryan, Iraq War veteran and businessman[78]
  • Gareth Rhodes, former gubernatorial aide[79]
  • Erin Collier, economist[80]
Declined
Withdrew
  • Sue Sullivan, strategic planning consultant[84][85]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Jeff
Beals
Dave
Clegg
Erin
Collier
Antonio
Delgado
Brian
Flynn
Gareth
Rhodes
Pat
Ryan
Other Undecided
Change Research (D-Collier) June 16–17, 2018 319 9% 5% 5% 21% 14% 4% 14% 27%

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Antonio Delgado 8,576 22.1
Democratic Pat Ryan 6,941 17.9
Democratic Gareth Rhodes 6,890 17.7
Democratic Brian Flynn 5,245 13.5
Democratic Jeff Beals 4,991 12.9
Democratic David Clegg 4,257 11.0
Democratic Erin Collier 1,908 4.9
Total votes 38,808 100.0

Republican primary

Independent candidates

Declared
Disqualified[88]
  • Dal LaMagna, businessman

General election

Debates

Endorsements

John Faso (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials
Antonio Delgado (D)
Former U.S. Executive Branch officials
U.S. Senators

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
John
Faso (R)
Antonio
Delgado (D)
Other Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College November 1–4, 2018 505 ± 4.8% 42% 43% 7% 8%
SurveyUSA October 26–29, 2018 609 ± 4.2% 44% 44% 6%[92] 6%
Monmouth University October 24–28, 2018 372 ± 5.1% 44% 49% 3%[93] 4%
Siena College October 12–16, 2018 500 ± 4.6% 44% 43% 6%[94] 7%
Monmouth University September 6–10, 2018 327 LV ± 5.4% 45% 48% 2%[95] 5%
401 RV ± 4.9% 43% 45% 3%[96] 9%
Siena College August 20–26, 2018 501 ± 4.8% 45% 40% 1%[97] 13%
IMGE Insights (R) July 9–12, 2018 400 49% 44% 7%
DCCC (D) June 27–28, 2018 545 ± 4.2% 42% 49%
Public Policy Polling (D) May 4–7, 2018 928 ± 3.2% 42% 42% 16%

Results

New York's 19th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Antonio Delgado 135,582 47.1
Working Families Antonio Delgado 9,237 3.2
Women's Equality Antonio Delgado 3,054 1.1
Total Antonio Delgado 147,873 51.4
Republican John Faso 112,304 39.0
Conservative John Faso 16,906 5.9
Independence John Faso 3,009 1.0
Reform John Faso 654 0.2
Total John Faso (incumbent) 132,873 46.1
Green Steven Greenfield 4,313 1.5
Independent Diane Neal 2,835 1.0
Total votes 287,894 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 20

The 20th district is located in the Capital District and includes all of Albany and Schenectady Counties, and portions of Montgomery, Rensselear and Saratoga Counties. The incumbent was Democrat Paul Tonko, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 21st district from 2009 to 2013. He was re-elected to a fifth term with 68% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Joe Vitollo, nurse and Republican nominee in 2016

General election

Results

New York's 20th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul Tonko 161,330 60.7
Working Families Paul Tonko 10,129 3.8
Women's Equality Paul Tonko 3,712 1.4
Reform Paul Tonko 1,640 0.6
Total Paul Tonko (incumbent) 176,811 66.5
Republican Joe Vitollo 89,058 33.5
Total votes 265,869 100.0
Democratic hold

District 21

The 21st district, the state's largest and most rural congressional district, includes most of the North Country and the northern suburbs of Syracuse. The district borders Vermont to the east. The incumbent was Republican Elise Stefanik, who had represented the district since 2015. She was re-elected to a second term with 65% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Don Boyajian, attorney and former congressional aide[98]
  • Tedra Cobb, former St. Lawrence County legislator[99]
  • Emily Martz, economic development adviser[100]
  • Patrick Nelson, biochemist, campaign director for Democratic nominee Mike Derrick in 2016, candidate for Stillwater Town Board in 2015[101]
  • Dylan Ratigan, businessman, author, film producer, The Young Turks political commentator and former MSNBC host[102]
  • Katie Wilson, antiques store owner[103]
Potential

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tedra Cobb 10,853 55.3
Democratic Katie Wilson 2,356 12.0
Democratic Dylan Ratigan 2,313 11.8
Democratic Emily Martz 2,165 11.0
Democratic Patrick Nelson 1,802 9.2
Democratic Don Boyajian 129 0.7
Total votes 19,618 100.0

Republican primary

Farmer and real estate broker Russ Finley planned on making a primary challenge of Stefanik,[107] but later withdrew from the race, leaving Stefanik unopposed in the primary.

Green primary

Past Green Party nominee Matt Funiciello announced that he would not run in 2018.[108] Lynn Kahn was the Green Party candidate in 2018.[109]

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Elise
Stefanik (R)
Tedra
Cobb (D)
Undecided
TargetPoint (R) October 14–16, 2018 491 50% 40%

Results

New York's 21st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Elise Stefanik 116,433 49.5
Conservative Elise Stefanik 11,398 4.9
Independence Elise Stefanik 3,369 1.4
Reform Elise Stefanik 781 0.3
Total Elise Stefanik (incumbent) 131,981 56.1
Democratic Tedra Cobb 93,394 39.7
Working Families Tedra Cobb 4,425 1.8
Women's Equality Tedra Cobb 1,972 0.9
Total Tedra Cobb 99,791 42.4
Green Lynn Kahn 3,437 1.5
Total votes 235,209 100.0
Republican hold

District 22

The 22nd district is located in Central New York and includes all of Chenango, Cortland, Madison and Oneida counties, and parts of Broome, Herkimer, Oswego and Tioga counties. The incumbent was Republican Claudia Tenney, who had represented the district since 2017. She was elected to replace retiring Representative Richard Hanna with 47% of the vote in 2016.

New York's 22nd district was included on the initial list of Republican-held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[9]

Democratic primary

Republican primary

General election

Endorsements

Claudia Tenney (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials
Individuals
Organizations
Newspapers

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Claudia
Tenney (R)
Anthony
Brindisi (D)
Other Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College November 1–4, 2018 506 ± 4.7% 46% 45% 9%
Siena College October 15–18, 2018 501 ± 4.7% 45% 46% 9%
The Polling Company (R-Citizens United) October 12–13, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 50% 42% 1% 7%
Siena College August 20–26, 2018 499 ± 4.8% 44% 46% 1%[97] 9%
Zogby Analytics April 23–27, 2018 358 ± 5.2% 40% 47% 13%
GQR Research (D) March 8–12, 2018 500 44% 50%
Public Policy Polling (D) November 9–10, 2017 599 ± 4.0% 41% 47% 12%
DCCC (D) October 10, 2017 561 ± 4.1% 43% 45% 12%

Results

New York's 22nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony Brindisi 116,001 46.2
Independence Anthony Brindisi 5,673 2.3
Working Families Anthony Brindisi 4,651 1.9
Women's Equality Anthony Brindisi 1,390 0.5
Total Anthony Brindisi 127,715 50.9
Republican Claudia Tenney 110,125 43.9
Conservative Claudia Tenney 12,061 4.8
Reform Claudia Tenney 1,056 0.4
Total Claudia Tenney (incumbent) 123,242 49.1
Total votes 250,957 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 23

The 23rd district includes all of Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Tompkins and Yates counties, along with parts of Ontario and Tioga counties. The incumbent was Republican Tom Reed, who had represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 29th district from 2009 to 2013. He was re-elected to a fifth term with 58% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Max Della Pia, retired air force officer[115]
  • Ian Golden, businessman[116]
  • Tracy Mitrano, Interim Director of the Executive Master's Program of the Park School of Communications at Ithaca College[117]
  • Eddie Sundquist, attorney[118]
Declined

Results

Although Della Pia finished slightly ahead of the other candidates on primary election night, he conceded to Mitrano after absentee ballots were counted.[122]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tracy Mitrano 7,724 32.9
Democratic Max Della Pia 7,494 31.9
Democratic Linda Andrei 3,603 15.3
Democratic Ian Golden 3,142 13.4
Democratic Eddie Sundquist 1,538 6.5
Total votes 23,501 100.0

Republican primary

Women's Equality primary

Tracy Mitrano, who also ran in the Democratic primary, ran unopposed for the Women's Equality Party nomination.

Results

Women's Equality Party primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Women's Equality Tracy Mitrano 4 100.0
Total votes 4 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Tom Reed (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Tom
Reed (R)
Tracy
Mitrano (D)
Undecided
Change Research (D-Mitrano) October 23–24, 2018 510 49% 47%

Results

New York's 23rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Reed 114,722 47.7
Conservative Tom Reed 12,274 5.1
Independence Tom Reed 3,327 1.4
Total Tom Reed (incumbent) 130,323 54.2
Democratic Tracy Mitrano 100,914 42.0
Working Families Tracy Mitrano 6,464 2.7
Women's Equality Tracy Mitrano 2,554 1.1
Total Tracy Mitrano 109,932 45.8
Total votes 240,255 100.0
Republican hold

District 24

The 24th district includes all of Cayuga, Onondaga and Wayne counties, and the western part of Oswego County. The incumbent was Republican John Katko, who had represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 61% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

New York's 24th district was included on the initial list of Republican-held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[9]

Candidates

Declared
Declined

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dana
Balter (D)
Juanita
Perez Williams (D)
Other Undecided
Siena College June 10–12, 2018 513 ± 4.5% 32% 45% 23%

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dana Balter 14,897 62.4
Democratic Juanita Perez Williams 8,958 37.6
Total votes 23,855 100.0

Republican primary

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
John
Katko (R)
Dana
Balter (D)
Undecided
Siena College October 18–22, 2018 500 ± 4.6% 53% 39% 8%
Siena College August 20–23, 2018 513 ± 4.7% 54% 39% 7%
Public Policy Polling (D) July 26–27, 2018 785 43% 47% 10%

Results

New York's 24th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Katko 113,538 43.6
Conservative John Katko 16,972 6.5
Independence John Katko 5,454 2.1
Reform John Katko 956 0.4
Total John Katko (incumbent) 136,920 52.6
Democratic Dana Balter 115,902 44.6
Working Families Dana Balter 4,784 1.8
Women's Equality Dana Balter 2,540 1.0
Total Dana Balter 123,226 47.4
Total votes 260,146 100.0
Republican hold

District 25

The 25th district is located entirely within Monroe County, centered on the city of Rochester. The seat was vacant due to the March 2018 death of incumbent Democratic Representative Louise Slaughter, who represented the district from 2013 to 2018 and previously represented the 28th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 30th district from 1987 to 1993.

Following precedent set in 2010, two concurrent elections were held in November 2018. One election was held to fill the seat for the 2018 lame-duck session, and another was held to fill the seat for the 2019–2020 term.[130]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrew

Results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Morelle 16,245 45.7
Democratic Rachel Barnhart 7,003 19.7
Democratic Robin Wilt 6,158 17.3
Democratic Adam McFadden 6,103 17.2
Total votes 35,509 100.0

Republican primary

  • Jim Maxwell, neurosurgeon[142]

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Joseph
Morelle (D)
Jim
Maxwell (R)
Undecided
Dixie Strategies October 29–30, 2018 843 ± 3.37% 49% 39% 12%
Siena College October 4–8, 2018 465 ± 4.7% 53% 36% 11%
Siena College August 15–19, 2018 500 ± 4.4% 55% 31% 13%

Results

New York's 25th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Morelle 147,979 54.8
Independence Joseph Morelle 4,585 1.7
Working Families Joseph Morelle 4,575 1.7
Women's Equality Joseph Morelle 2,105 0.8
Total Joseph Morelle 159,244 59.0
Republican Jim Maxwell 91,342 33.8
Conservative Jim Maxwell 17,781 6.6
Reform Jim Maxwell 1,613 0.6
Total Jim Maxwell 110,736 41.0
Total votes 269,980 100.0
Democratic hold

District 26

The 26th district is located in Erie and Niagara counties and includes the cities of Buffalo and Niagara Falls. The incumbent was Democrat Brian Higgins, who had represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 27th district from 2005 to 2013. He was re-elected to a seventh term with 75% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

  • Renee Zeno, businesswoman

General election

Results

New York's 26th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brian Higgins 156,968 68.0
Working Families Brian Higgins 8,929 3.9
Women's Equality Brian Higgins 3,269 1.4
Total Brian Higgins (incumbent) 169,166 73.3
Republican Renee Zeno 61,488 26.7
Total votes 230,654 100.0
Democratic hold

District 27

The 27th district is located in Western New York and includes all of Orleans, Genesee, Wyoming and Livingston counties, and parts of Erie, Monroe, Niagara and Ontario counties.

On August 11, 2018, incumbent Republican Chris Collins, who had represented the district since 2013 and was re-elected to a third term with 67% of the vote in 2016, announced that he would withdraw from his re-election campaign after being arrested for insider trading. Removing himself from the ballot would have required Collins to be nominated as a dummy candidate in another election or to move his legal place of residence out of state (he has additional homes in Florida and the District of Columbia).[143] On September 17, 2018, Collins announced that he had changed course and would campaign for re-election in November after all.[144]

Democratic primary

New York's 27th district was included on the initial list of Republican-held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[9]

Candidates

Nominee
Withdrew
  • Erin Cole, U.S. Army veteran, former senior vice president of Global NY with Empire State Development[146]
  • Sean Bunny, prosecutor, Erie County District Attorney's Office[147][148]
  • Nick Stankevich, business owner, Mumford[149][150]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Withdrew
  • Frank C. Smierciak II[151]
  • Larry Piegza, computer technician and entrepreneur, remains in election as nominee of the Reform Party[152]

Republican post-primary

Potential

Following Collins's August 11 announcement that he would withdraw from the race, as many as 20 candidates expressed interest in the Republican nomination. (Collins later changed course and opted to seek re-election.) Among them were the following:[153]

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Chris
Collins (R)
Nate
McMurray (D)
Larry
Piegza (REF)
Undecided
Dixie Strategies October 29–30, 2018 801 ± 3.46% 45% 38% 17%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 24–29, 2018 501 ± 4.8% 44% 40% 3% 13%
Tulchin Research (D-McMurray) October 25–28, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 43% 47% 4% 6%
Siena College October 6–11, 2018 490 ± 4.7% 46% 43% 1% 10%
Tulchin Research (D-McMurray) October 6–8, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 42% 42% 6% 10%

Results

New York's 27th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Collins 114,506 40.2
Conservative Chris Collins 23,553 8.2
Independence Chris Collins 2,087 0.7
Total Chris Collins (incumbent) 140,146 49.1
Democratic Nate McMurray 128,167 45.0
Working Families Nate McMurray 8,090 2.8
Women's Equality Nate McMurray 2,802 1.0
Total Nate McMurray 139,059 48.8
Reform Larry Piegza 5,973 2.1
Total votes 285,178 100.0
Republican hold

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  30. ^ a b Shapiro, Rachel (May 15, 2017). "Conservative voters chide Donovan while 3 Dems challenge". Staten Island Advance. Retrieved May 16, 2017.
  31. ^ Bowman, Bridget (August 2, 2017). "Army Vet Max Rose to Challenge GOP Rep. Dan Donovan". Roll Call. Retrieved August 2, 2017.
  32. ^ Shapiro, Rachel (September 22, 2017). "Sixth Dem, a lifelong Staten Islander, challenges Donovan". Staten Island Advance. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  33. ^ Katinas, Paula (May 4, 2017). "Retired boxer plans to run against Donovan". Brooklyn Eagle. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  34. ^ Bredderman, Will (May 8, 2017). "Democratic Candidate for Staten Island's House Seat Isn't a Democrat and Doesn't Live on Staten Island". New York Observer. Retrieved May 16, 2017.
  35. ^ Katinas, Paula (June 1, 2017). "Ex-cop announces run for Donovan's House seat". Brooklyn Eagle. Retrieved June 2, 2017.
  36. ^ Michel, Clifford (March 4, 2018). "Island government: Donovan gets endorsements; Dem drops out of race". Staten Island Advance. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  37. ^ Rauh, Grace (August 2, 2017). "Michael Grimm eyes return to Congress". NY1. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  38. ^ Shapiro, Rachel (August 3, 2017). "Former Grimm supporters don't see path to victory if he runs for Congress". Staten Island Advance. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  39. ^ Donald J. Trump. "There is no one better to represent the people of N.Y. and Staten Island (a place I know very well) than @RepDanDonovan, who is strong on Borders & Crime, loves our Military & our Vets, voted for Tax Cuts and is helping me to Make America Great Again. Dan has my full endorsement!". Twitter.
  40. ^ Kane, Paul (February 8, 2018). "In the shadow of Nancy Pelosi, Joseph Crowley campaigns — but for what?". The Washington Post.
  41. ^ Barkan, Ross (June 19, 2017). "The Most Powerful Democrat In Queens Must Finally Compete". Village Voice. Retrieved August 27, 2017.
  42. ^ Joyce, A.P., "Meet the young, progressive Latina trying to oust one of the most powerful Democrats in the House," Mic, February 18, 2018.
  43. ^ Sakellis, Eleni. "Prof. Anthony Pappas Running for Congress". The National Herald. The National Herald, Inc. Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  44. ^ Gray, Briahna; Grim, Ryan (June 13, 2018). "Under Pressure From Progressives, Rep. Ro Khanna Endorses Both Democrats in Contentious New York Primary". The Intercept.
  45. ^ Gabbard, Tulsi (June 27, 2018). ".@Ocasio2018 Congratulations on your historic win last night!  Throughout your activism and your campaign, you demonstrated positive, strong, principled leadership that is focused on serving the people and protecting our planet. I look forward to working with you".
  46. ^ @AyannaPressley (June 21, 2018). ".@Ocasio2018 my sister in service, my team and I are humbled by your leadership and honored to have your back. May we both have the privilege to serve together in Congress and lift the voices of everyone in our districts #changecantwait #ma7 #ny14 #mapoli #bospoli #nypoli" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  47. ^ Omar, Ilhan (June 26, 2018). "You got this!  Everyone go  for hope and truth. Please send Ocasio-Cortez to Washington to fight for all of us.https://twitter.com/ocasio2018/status/1011600431452229635 …". line feed character in |title= at position 14 (help); External link in |title= (help)
  48. ^ "New York Daily News". nydailynews.com. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  49. ^ "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter".
  50. ^ Dore, Jimmy (June 7, 2017). "Progressive Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Is Primarying Corporate Democrat In New York". YouTube. The Jimmy Dore Show.
  51. ^ Fantano, Anthony [@theneedledrop] (June 27, 2018). "THIS IS EXCELLENT!" (Tweet). Retrieved September 9, 2018 – via Twitter.
  52. ^ "Insanely Corrupt Democrat Rigs Process Against Progressive Challenger". YouTube. Secular Talk. March 27, 2018.
  53. ^ @THEKIDMERO (June 15, 2018). "TIRA PA'LANTE!!!!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  54. ^ @THEKIDMERO (June 26, 2018). "IM RIDING WITH @Ocasio2018!! YOU SHOULD BE TOO. LETS GET THESE OLD WASHED YAKUBS OUTTA HERE" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  55. ^ @LCMoser (June 15, 2018). "Go, go, @Ocasio2018!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  56. ^ @ZephyrTeachout (May 31, 2018). "Today I am proud to endorse the gutsy, hopeful, grassroots campaign of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for Congress" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  57. ^ "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Takes On Corporate Democrat Joe Crowley". YouTube. The Young Turks. April 4, 2018.
  58. ^ @MaraWilson (June 26, 2018). "If I still lived in New York, you would have my vote!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  59. ^ Sarandon, Susan (June 20, 2018). "So happy to support Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez in her challenge to upset the 20-year Machine In Queens & South Bronx on June 26th. Money vs. People. This is Huge. Check out http://ocasio2018.com  to learn more!pic.twitter.com/i9znHmIE51". External link in |title= (help)
  60. ^ Appelbaum, Stuart (June 28, 2018). "RWDSU Endorses Ocasio-Cortez for Congress". Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union.
  61. ^ "Candidates | Brand New Congress". brandnewcongress.org.
  62. ^ Dean, Jim (June 22, 2018). "Democracy for America : Democracy for America endorses Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for Congress in NY-14". democracyforamerica.com. Democracy for America.
  63. ^ Media, Wire Service. "DSA Endorse Four More Women in California and New York :: Wire Service Media".
  64. ^ "Justice Democrats | Candidates". now.justicedemocrats.com. Archived from the original on June 27, 2018. Retrieved June 1, 2018.
  65. ^ MoveOn [@MoveOn] (June 18, 2018). "#MoveOn members in #NY14 have overwhelmingly voted to endorse Ocasio2018 for the #NY14 U.S. House seat!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  66. ^ "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez". Our Revolution.
  67. ^ Lipton, Bill. "New York - Working Families Endorsements". Working Families.
  68. ^ Campanile, Carl (June 16, 2018). "Queens Democratic club snubs longtime Rep. Joe Crowley". New York Post.
  69. ^ "Endorsements". People for Bernie Sanders.
  70. ^ Lieberman, Joe. "Vote Joe Crowley, for Working Families". Wall Street Journal.
  71. ^ Harris, Lee. "Joe Lieberman urges New Yorkers to vote for Joe Crowley over Ocasio-Cortez". ABC News.
  72. ^ "Election Results New York House District 14". New York Times. November 8, 2018. Retrieved November 8, 2018.
  73. ^ McKenna, Chris (January 31, 2018). "Maloney challenger opens campaign". Times Herald-Record. Retrieved February 2, 2018.
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  75. ^ Kirby, Paul (June 21, 2017). "Woodstock teacher Jeffrey Beals touts 'strong record of public service' in running for 19th Congressional District seat". Daily Freeman. Retrieved June 23, 2017.
  76. ^ Hamilton, Matthew (June 5, 2017). "Democrat Antonio Delgado makes NY-19 bid official". Times Union. Retrieved June 5, 2017.
  77. ^ Moody, Richard (May 10, 2017). "Hunter businessman to challenge Faso". The Register Star. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
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  79. ^ "Smelling Blood, Democrats Swarm New York House Race". Retrieved June 29, 2018.
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  83. ^ a b Hamilton, Matthew (April 11, 2017). "Will Yandik won't seek NY-19 seat in 2018". Times Union. Retrieved April 18, 2017.
  84. ^ Zangla, Ariel (May 17, 2017). "Field of Faso election challengers grows". Daily Freeman. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
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  86. ^ Respers France, Lisa (February 7, 2018). "'Law & Order: SVU' star running for Congress". CNN. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  87. ^ Nanci, Matthew. "Actress Diane Neal wins appeal to run against Faso, Delgado". Record Online. Gatehouse Media, LLC. Retrieved September 18, 2018.
  88. ^ Zangla, Ariél (August 24, 2018). "ELECTION 2018: Nominating petitions of actress Diane Neal, fellow independent Dal LaMagna ruled invalid in NY 19th Congressional District". The Daily Freeman. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  89. ^ Donald J. Trump. "Congressman John Faso of New York has worked hard and smart. Strong on Crime, Borders and our 2nd Amendment, John is respected by all. Vote for John. He has my complete and total Endorsement!". Twitter.
  90. ^ Barack Obama [@BarackObama] (August 1, 2018). "Today I'm proud to endorse such a wide and impressive array of Democratic candidates – leaders as diverse, patriotic, and big-hearted as the America they're running to represent:" (Tweet). Retrieved August 1, 2018 – via Twitter.
  91. ^ Brian Schatz. "Every seat counts equally but it is especially important that Delgado wins to repudiate this racist trash". Twitter.
  92. ^ Steven Greenfield (G) with 3%, Diane Neal (I) with 3%
  93. ^ "Other candidate" with 2%, Steven Greenfield (G) with 1%,
  94. ^ Diane Neal (I) with 5%, Steven Greenfield (G) with 1%
  95. ^ Steven Greenfield (G) 1%, Other 1%
  96. ^ Steven Greenfield (G) 2%, Other 1%
  97. ^ a b 1% won't vote.
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  99. ^ Molongoski, Brian (July 5, 2017). "Democrat Tedra Cobb to challenge Stefanik for NY-21 seat". Watertown Daily Times. Retrieved July 5, 2017.
  100. ^ Raymo, Denise (July 12, 2017). "Democrat Emily Martz announces candidacy in 21st Congressional District". The Post-Star. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  101. ^ Thompson, Maury (January 30, 2017). "Political activist will run for Congress". The Post-Star. Retrieved January 31, 2017.
  102. ^ Pedersen, Erik (February 21, 2018). "MSNBC Alum Dylan Ratigan Running For Congress". Deadline. Retrieved June 28, 2017.
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  105. ^ Thompson, Maury (June 30, 2017). "Two more Democrats poised to enter 2018 NY21 primary race, two more considering". The Post-Star. Retrieved July 5, 2017.
  106. ^ Olivero, Antonio (May 6, 2017). "Several mull Stefanik challenge for 21st Congressional District". Adirondack Daily Enterprise. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  107. ^ Thompson, Maury (July 26, 2017). "St. Lawrence County farmer to challenge Stefanik in GOP primary". The Post-Star. Retrieved July 27, 2017.
  108. ^ Thompson, Maury (August 1, 2017). "Funiciello to forgo third run for Congress". The Post-Star. Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  109. ^ New York's 21st Congressional candidates https://ballotpedia.org/New_York%27s_21st_Congressional_District_election,_2018
  110. ^ Blanchard, Peter. "Cincinnatus man will challenge CNY Congresswoman Claudia Tenney in 2018". Cortland Voice. Retrieved August 21, 2017.
  111. ^ Harding, Robert (August 14, 2018). "'I'm here for Claudia': Trump boosts Tenney at Utica fundraiser". The Auburn Citizen.
  112. ^ Claudia Tenney. "Our team was thrilled to welcome @EricTrump to #NY22 today! Thanks to the policies of @realDonaldTrump, our economy is booming and jobs are coming back from overseas. Republicans are fired up and ready to stop Nancy Pelosi from becoming Speaker!". Twitter.
  113. ^ "NFIB Endorses Tenney for Re-election". Observer-Dispatch. August 21, 2018.
  114. ^ "Endorsements For New York November 6 General Election". New York Post. October 20, 2018.
  115. ^ Golden, Vaughn (July 5, 2017). "2018 Congressional Challengers: Max Della Pia". Ithaca Times. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  116. ^ O'Connor, Kelsey (May 12, 2017). "Political newcomer Ian Golden enters race for New York's 23rd Congressional District". The Ithaca Voice. Retrieved May 12, 2017.
  117. ^ "Mitrano officially kicks off Congressional run". Ithaca Times. September 6, 2017. Retrieved September 6, 2017.
  118. ^ Zremski, Jerry (June 22, 2017). "Jamestown lawyer, 'Star Trek' actor among those challenging Reed". The Buffalo News. Retrieved June 22, 2017.
  119. ^ Miller, Rick (July 29, 2017). "DiNapoli encouraged at number of congressional Dem candidates". Olean Times Herald. Retrieved August 2, 2017.
  120. ^ "Democrats Searching For Reed Opponent". The Post-Journal. April 25, 2017. Retrieved May 12, 2017.
  121. ^ D'Agostino, John (April 28, 2017). "Reed's nonstop race for Congress". The Observer. Retrieved May 12, 2017.
  122. ^ Almendarez, Jolene (July 3, 2018). "Democratic Primary: Max Della Pia concedes to Tracy Mitrano". Ithaca Voice. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  123. ^ "Congressman Tom Reed gets shout-out from President Trump". Ithaca Times. October 4, 2018.
  124. ^ Weiner, Mark (September 17, 2017). "Syracuse University professor seeks to challenge Rep. John Katko for Congress". syracuse.com. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  125. ^ Parsnow, Luke (April 9, 2018). "Juanita Perez Williams has the right to run for Congress". Syracuse New Times.
  126. ^ a b c d Weiner, Mark (July 5, 2017). "7 Democrats who may challenge John Katko for Congress". Syracuse.com. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  127. ^ Harding, Robert (June 7, 2017). "Cuomo targets Republicans in NY races for Congress — but not Katko". The Citizen. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  128. ^ Harding, Robert (July 11, 2017). "First Democrat to announce bid to unseat Rep. John Katko in CNY race for Congress". The Citizen. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  129. ^ Lisa W. Foderaro (January 25, 2018). "Stephanie Miner Rules Out Bid for Congress, but May Yet Challenge Cuomo". The New York Times.
  130. ^ "Cuomo Synchronizes NY-25 Special With General Election". nystateofpolitics.com.
  131. ^ "City Councilman Adam McFadden running for Congress". WHAM. March 30, 2018.
  132. ^ "Assemblyman Joseph Morelle to run for Louise Slaughter's congressional seat". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  133. ^ a b Gorbman, Randy (March 26, 2018). "Candidates for 25th Congressional seat announcing". WBFO. Retrieved March 29, 2018.
  134. ^ "Building on the Legacy of Progressive Leadership for the Rochester Region". crowdpac.com.
  135. ^ Moule, Jeremy (March 28, 2018). "Wilt launches House bid, picks up progressive group's endorsement". Rochester City Newspaper. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  136. ^ "Race heats up to fill Slaughter's House seat". The Hill. March 27, 2018. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  137. ^ Cleveland, Will (April 4, 2018). "Rachel Barnhart secures signatures for congressional primary to run for Slaughter's seat". Democrat & Chronicle. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  138. ^ "Rachel Barnhart to announce bid for 25th Congressional District seat". WHAM. April 17, 2018. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  139. ^ Campbell, Joe; Orr, Steve (March 16, 2018). "Rep. Louise Slaughter: How will her successor be chosen?". Democrat & Chronicle. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
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  142. ^ "Neurosurgeon Dr. Jim Maxwell announces candidacy for Congress". 13wham.com. January 13, 2018. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  143. ^ Cheney, Kyle; Vielkind, Jimmy (August 11, 2018). "Rep. Chris Collins, fighting prosecution, seeks to end reelection bid". Politico. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
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  145. ^ "Grand Island town supervisor joins four other Dems to challenge Chris Collins". Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  146. ^ "Cole Ends Short-Lived Challenge to Collins". nystateofpolitics.com. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  147. ^ Touhey, Ali (October 19, 2017). "Sean Bunny to challenge Rep. Chris Collins in 2018 Election". WKBW. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  148. ^ "Bunny ends congressional race against Collins as McMurray gains strength".
  149. ^ "Mumford businessman announces Congressional run". The Daily News. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  150. ^ "Field narrows to one for Democratic challenger to Chris Collins". The Buffalo News. Retrieved April 9, 2018.
  151. ^ "Collins faces challenge from 26-year-old GOP newcomer". The Buffalo News. July 6, 2017. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
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  153. ^ "8 candidates for Collins' seat meet in Livingston County". WIVB. August 16, 2018.
  154. ^ Anstey, Evan (August 21, 2018). "Bellavia no longer seeking to replace Chris Collins". WIVB-TV. Nexstar Media Group. Retrieved August 21, 2018.
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This page was last edited on 18 May 2019, at 19:59
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