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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Indiana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Indiana

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

Indiana's nine seats in the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 7 2
Seats won 7 2
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,247,978 1,000,104
Percentage 55.31% 44.33%
Swing Increase1.03% Increase4.72%

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Indiana were held on November 6, 2018, to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state of Indiana, one from each of the state's nine congressional districts. The elections coincided with other elections to the House of Representatives, as well as elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The filing deadline for candidates was February 9, 2018. The primaries were held on May 8, 2018.

Contents

Overview

Popular vote
Republican
55.31%
Democratic
44.33%
Other
0.36%
House seats
Republican
77.78%
Democratic
22.22%

District 1

The incumbent is Democrat Pete Visclosky, who has represented the district since 1985. Visclosky was re-elected with 82% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Visclosky (incumbent) 42,261 80.5
Democratic Antonio Daggett Sr. 5,813 11.1
Democratic Larry Chubb 4,402 8.4
Total votes 52,476 100.0

Republican primary

  • John Meyer
  • Jeremy Belko
  • David Dopp[3]
  • Roseann Ivanovich
  • Mark Leyva
  • Nicholas Pappas

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Leyva 5,960 27.0
Republican John Meyer 4,328 19.6
Republican Roseann Ivanovich 4,317 19.6
Republican Nicholas Pappas 4,311 19.5
Republican David Dopp 1,679 7.6
Republican Jeremy Belko 1,485 6.7
Total votes 22,080 100

General election

Results

Indiana's 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Visclosky (incumbent) 159,611 65.1
Republican Mark Leyva 85,594 34.9
Independent Jonathan S. Kleinman (write-in) 4 0.0
Total votes 245,209 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

The incumbent is Republican Jackie Walorski, who has represented the district since 2013. Walorski was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2016.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee included Indiana's 2nd congressional district on its initial list of Republican-held seats considered targets in 2018.[4][5]

Democratic primary

  • Douglas Carpenter[6]
  • Pat Hackett, attorney[7]
  • Mel Hall, businessman[8]
  • Yatish Joshi, businessman[9]
  • Roland Leech[10]
  • John Petroff, school bus driver[11]

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mel Hall 15,384 41.7
Democratic Pat Hackett 10,420 28.2
Democratic Yatish Joshi 8,155 22.1
Democratic Douglas Carpenter 1,949 5.3
Democratic John Petroff 569 1.5
Democratic Roland Leech 450 1.2
Total votes 36,927 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jackie Walorski (incumbent) 42,952 78.6
Republican Mark Summe 11,666 21.4
Total votes 54,618 100

General election

Results

Indiana's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jackie Walorski (incumbent) 125,499 54.8
Democratic Mel Hall 103,363 45.2
Independent Richard Wolf (write-in) 27 0.0
Total votes 228,889 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The incumbent is Republican Jim Banks, who has represented the district since 2017. Banks was elected with 70% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • John Roberson, former police officer[12]
  • Tommy Schrader[13]
  • Courtney Tritch, businesswoman[14]

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Courtney Tritch 16,376 79.1
Democratic Tommy Schrader 2,224 10.7
Democratic John Roberson 2,115 10.2
Total votes 20,715 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Banks (incumbent) 58,738 100.0
Total votes 58,738 100

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Courtney
Tritch (D)
Jim
Banks (R)
Undecided
WPA Intelligence (R-Banks) May 29–31, 2018 401 34% 55%

Results

Indiana's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Banks (incumbent) 158,927 64.7
Democratic Courtney Tritch 86,610 35.3
Total votes 245,537 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The incumbent is Republican Todd Rokita, who has represented the district since 2011. Rokita was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2016. Rokita did not run for reelection, as he entered the Republican primary for the  Indiana senate race.

Democratic primary

  • Tobi Beck, security technology designer[15]
  • Roger Day
  • Roland Ellis
  • Darin Patrick Griesey, retired machinist[16]
  • Joe Mackey[17]
  • Veronikka Ziol[18]

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tobi Beck 6,466 34.6
Democratic Veronikka Ziol 3,938 21.1
Democratic Joe Mackey 3,012 16.1
Democratic Roger Day 2,324 12.4
Democratic Roland Ellis 1,712 9.2
Democratic Darin Patrick Griesey 1,249 6.7
Total votes 18,701 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Baird 29,316 36.6
Republican Steve Braun 23,594 29.4
Republican Diego Morales 11,994 15.0
Republican Jared Thomas 8,453 10.5
Republican Kevin Grant 3,667 4.6
Republican James Nease 2,096 2.6
Republican Tim Radice 1,022 1.3
Total votes 80,142 100.0

General election

Results

Indiana's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Baird 156,539 64.1
Democratic Tobi Beck 87,824 35.9
Total votes 244,363 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

The incumbent is Republican Susan Brooks, who has represented the district since 2013. Brooks was re-elected with 61% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • Dion Douglas[26]
  • Sean Dugdale[27]
  • Eshel Faraggi, biophysicist and professor[28]
  • Kyle Brenden Moore, businessman
  • Dee Thornton, businesswoman[29]

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dee Thornton 18,073 53.0
Democratic Kyle Brenden Moore 8,077 23.7
Democratic Dion Douglas 3,520 10.3
Democratic Eshel Faraggi 2,583 7.6
Democratic Sean Dugdale 1,858 5.4
Total votes 34,111 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Susan Brooks (incumbent) 63,901 100.0
Total votes 63,901 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Susan
Brooks (R)
Dee
Thornton (D)
Undecided
Change Research (D) October 27–29, 2018 527 50% 44%

Results

Indiana's 5th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Susan Brooks (incumbent) 180,035 56.8
Democratic Dee Thornton 137,142 43.2
Total votes 317,177 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The incumbent is Republican Luke Messer, who has represented the district since 2013. Messer did not run for reelection as he entered into the Republican primary for the Indiana senate race.

Democratic primary

  • George Holland, pharmaceutical salesman[30]
  • K. Jasen Lave, writer and musician[31]
  • Jeannine Lee Lake, publisher and CEO[32]
  • Jim Pruett, attorney[33]
  • Lane Siekman, attorney[34]
  • Joshua Williamson, industrial technician[35]

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jeannine Lee Lake 8,887 38.3
Democratic Jim Pruett 5,981 25.8
Democratic Lane Siekman 3,606 15.6
Democratic George Holland 2,567 11.1
Democratic Joshua Williamson 1,695 7.3
Democratic Jasen Lave 446 1.9
Total votes 23,182 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Greg Pence 47,955 65.3
Republican Jonathan Lamb 17,523 23.9
Republican Mike Campbell 3,229 4.4
Republican Stephen MacKenzie 2,500 3.4
Republican Jeff Smith 2,258 3.1
Total votes 73,465 100.0

General election

Results

Indiana's 6th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Greg Pence 154,260 63.8
Democratic Jeannine Lee Lake 79,430 32.9
Libertarian Tom Ferkinhoff 8,030 3.3
Independent John Miller (write-in) 5 0.0
Independent Heather Leigh Meloy (write-in) 1 0.0
Total votes 241,726 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The incumbent is Democrat André Carson, who has represented the district since 2008. Carson was re-elected with 60% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic André Carson (incumbent) 37,401 87.9
Democratic Sue Spicer 3,485 8.2
Democratic Curtis Godfrey 723 1.7
Democratic Bob Kern 703 1.7
Democratic Pierre Pullins 224 0.5
Total votes 42,356 100.0

Republican primary

  • John L. Couch
  • J. Jason Davis
  • Donald Eason Jr.
  • J.D. Miniear[43]
  • Wayne Harmon[44]
  • Tony Van Pelt

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Harmon 6,534 28.8
Republican Donald Eason Jr. 4,343 19.2
Republican John L. Couch 3,461 15.3
Republican J.D. Miniear 3,079 13.6
Republican J. Jason Davis 2,697 11.9
Republican Tony Van Pelt 2,561 11.3
Total votes 22,675 100.0

General election

Results

Indiana's 7th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic André Carson (incumbent) 141,139 64.9
Republican Wayne Harmon 76,457 35.1
Total votes 217,596 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8

The incumbent is Republican Larry Bucshon, who has represented the district since 2011. Brooks was re-elected with 64% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary

  • William Tanoos, attorney[45]

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Tanoos 25,472 100.0
Total votes 25,472 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry Bucshon (incumbent) 34,502 59.7
Republican Richard Moss 15,396 26.6
Republican Rachel Covington 7,924 13.7
Total votes 57,822 100.0

General election

Results

Indiana's 8th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry Bucshon (incumbent) 157,396 64.4
Democratic William Tanoos 86,895 35.6
Total votes 244,291 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The incumbent is Republican Trey Hollingsworth, who has represented the district since 2017. Hollingsworth was elected with 54% of the vote in 2016.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee included Indiana'a 9th congressional district on its initial list of Republican-held seats considered targets in 2018.

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Liz Watson 24,981 66.4
Democratic Dan Canon 11,549 30.7
Democratic Rob Chatlos 1,100 2.9
Total votes 37,630 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trey Hollingsworth (incumbent) 46,884 77.7
Republican James Dean Alspach 13,445 22.3
Total votes 60,329 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Trey
Hollingsworth (R)
Liz
Watson (D)
Undecided
Change Research (D) October 27–29, 2018 541 52% 45%

Results

Indiana's 9th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trey Hollingsworth (incumbent) 153,271 56.5
Democratic Liz Watson 118,090 43.5
Total votes 271,361 100.0
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ Dolan, Bill. "Contests are few and far between in Northwest Indiana's legislative districts". Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  2. ^ Writer, JON GARD - Staff. "Field set for May primary election". TheNewsDispatch.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  3. ^ 219-662-5328, Bill Dolan bill.dolan@nwi.com,. "More candidates fill the May 8 primary ballot lists". nwitimes.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  4. ^ Cheney, Kyle (January 30, 2017). "Amid Democratic doldrums, DCCC identifies 2018 targets". Politico. Retrieved February 11, 2017.
  5. ^ Sena, Dan (January 30, 2017). "House Democrats Playing Offense" (PDF). Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Retrieved February 11, 2017.
  6. ^ "Douglas Carpenter". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  7. ^ DeBonis, Mike (2018-04-02). "Will Democrats' Pennsylvania playbook work elsewhere? This Indiana primary could tell the tale". Washington Post. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  8. ^ Peterson, Mark. "2nd District Democrat Mel Hall launches run for Congress". Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  9. ^ Tribune, Jeff Parrott South Bend. "South Bend businessman Yatish Joshi to run for Jackie Walorski's congressional seat". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  10. ^ "5 area state legislators facing primary challengers | Local politics | Journal Gazette". www.journalgazette.net. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  11. ^ "Petroff seeks 2nd District US House seat". Herald Argus. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  12. ^ "Democrat making 3rd bid for Congress | Political notebook | Journal Gazette". www.journalgazette.net. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  13. ^ Campbell, Holly (2016-05-04). "The unconventional Congressional candidate: 1-on-1 with Tommy Schrader". WANE. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  14. ^ "Taking 2018 is goal, Tritch tells crowd | Local politics | Journal Gazette". www.journalgazette.net. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  15. ^ reporter@rensselaerrepublican.com, Nick Fiala. "Tobi Beck campaigns for U.S. Congress". Newsbug.info. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  16. ^ Kirk, Mitchell. "Monticello man running for Congress". Pharos-Tribune. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  17. ^ "Letter: Health care is why I back Joe Mackey in 4th District". Journal & Courier. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  18. ^ Reporter, CHASE PUTRICH Staff. "4th District Democratic candidates debate the issues". Purdue Exponent. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  19. ^ "Republican Jim Baird announces run for District 4 seat in U.S. Congress". Greencastle Banner Graphic. 2017-10-19. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  20. ^ Zimmerman, Devin. "On the issues: Congressional candidate Steve Braun". Kokomo Perspective. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  21. ^ reporter, Mitchell Kirk Staff. "Congressional candidates stump at GOP event". Pharos-Tribune. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  22. ^ "Purdue graduate Diego Morales running for Indiana's 4th Congressional District". WLFI News. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  23. ^ reporter, Mitchell Kirk Staff. "Congressional candidate visits Logansport". Pharos-Tribune. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  24. ^ "4th district congressional debate at Faith Community Center". WLFI News. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  25. ^ "Thomas announces campaign for 4th Congressional District | www.carrollcountycomet.com | Carroll County Comet". Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  26. ^ Bulletin, Ken de la Bastide | The Herald. "Convicted felon running for Congress". Herald Bulletin. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  27. ^ "ELECTION NEWS". hartfordcitynewstimes.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  28. ^ Bulletin, Ken de la Bastide | The Herald. "Primary election fields are set". Herald Bulletin. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  29. ^ "Madam Candidate: Indiana's Dee Thornton Is Running to 'Give Voice to the Voiceless' in 2018". IJR - Independent Journal Review. 2018-03-21. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  30. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: George T. Holland". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  31. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: K. Jasen Lave". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  32. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Jeannine Lee Lake". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  33. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A : James E. "Jim" Pruett". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  34. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Lane Siekman". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  35. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Joshua Williamson". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  36. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Mike Campbell". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  37. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Jonathan Lamb". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  38. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Stephen M. MacKenzie". The Republic. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  39. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Greg Pence". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  40. ^ Reports, Staff. "Where they stand Q&A: Jeff Smith". Daily Reporter. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  41. ^ CHAPPEL, EBONY. "Battle for the 7th Congressional District". Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  42. ^ McKinney, Graham Hunter, Matt (2018-04-13). "Campaign signs stolen from Indy Congressional candidate". RTV6. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  43. ^ "Click here to support JD Miniear for Congress by JD Miniear". Fundly. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  44. ^ "Click here to support Wayne"Gunny"Harmon for US Congress organized by Wayne Harmon". gofundme.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  45. ^ Garcia, Eric; Garcia, Eric (2017-08-10). "Bucshon Gets Democratic Challenger". Roll Call. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  46. ^ "Oceans separate Indiana congressional candidate Rachel Covington from voters". Evansville Courier & Press. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  47. ^ HAMMER, STUART (2018-04-11). "Man with white nationalist history works Moss campaign". TRISTATEHOMEPAGE. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  48. ^ "Is This Indiana Civil Rights Lawyer the Great Progressive Hope of 2018?". Vice. 2018-01-26. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  49. ^ "IN-District 9 candidate Rob Chatlos says he's using his blue-collar background as an advantage - Indiana Daily Student". www.idsnews.com. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  50. ^ Ryan, Chris. "Ninth District candidate Liz Watson returns home to run". NUVO. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  51. ^ "9th District Congressional Candidates Participate In Healthcare Forum". News - Indiana Public Media. Retrieved 2018-04-14.

External links

Official campaign websites of first district candidates
Official campaign websites of second district candidates
Official campaign websites of third district candidates
Official campaign websites of fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites of fifth district candidates
Official campaign websites of sixth district candidates
Official campaign websites of seventh district candidates
Official campaign websites of eighth district candidates
Official campaign websites of ninth district candidates
This page was last edited on 28 March 2019, at 19:31
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