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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 4 Arkansas seats to the United States House of Representatives
Turnout49.85%
  Majority party Minority party Third party
 
Party Republican Democratic Libertarian
Last election 4 0 0
Seats won 4 0 0
Seat change Steady Steady Steady
Popular vote 556,339 312,978 19,625
Percentage 62.56% 35.19% 2.21%
Swing Decrease8.60% Increase24.77% Decrease16.18%

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018, to elect the four U.S. Representatives from the U.S. state of Arkansas; one from each of the state's four congressional districts. Primaries were held on May 22, 2018. The elections and primaries coincided with the elections and primaries of other federal and state offices. Polls were open from 7:30 AM to 7:30 PM CST.[1]

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Transcription

Racist. Sexist. Republican. These words are virtually interchangeable—at least, according to most professors, journalists, and celebrities. So, are they right? Let’s take a look at history. The Republican Party was created in 1854. The first Republican Party platform, adopted at the party’s first national convention in 1856, promised to defeat, quote, “those twin relics of barbarism: polygamy and slavery.” Those “twin relics” were spreading into the western territories. Republicans feared that as those territories became states, polygamy and slavery might become permanent parts of American life. Polygamy—the marriage of one man to multiple women—devalued women and made them a kind of property. Slavery, of course, did the same to blacks. Literally. The Democrats were so opposed to the Republicans and their anti-slavery stance that in 1860, just six weeks after the election of the first Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, South Carolina, a state dominated by Democrats, voted to secede from the union. The Civil War that followed was the bloodiest war in US history. It led to the passage, by Republicans, of the 13th Amendment, which freed the slaves; the 14th Amendment, which gave them citizenship; and the 15th Amendment; which gave them the vote. In 1870, the first black senator and the first black congressman were sworn in—both Republicans. In fact, every black representative in the House until 1935 was a Republican. And every black senator until 1979 was, too. For that matter, the first female member of Congress was a Republican; the first Hispanic governor and senator were Republicans. The first Asian senator? You get the idea. Republicans also kept their pledge to defend women’s rights. In 1862, the Morrill Anti-Bigamy Act was passed by the Republican-controlled Congress to put an end to polygamy. In 1920, after 52 years of Democratic Party opposition, the 19th Amendment was ratified thanks to the Republican Congress, which pressured Democratic President Woodrow Wilson to drop his opposition to women’s rights. In the final tally, only 59 percent of House Democrats and 41 percent of Senate Democrats supported women’s suffrage. That’s compared to 91 percent of House Republicans and 82 percent of Senate Republicans. There certainly was a “war on women”—and it was led by the Democratic Party. But while Republicans had won a major battle for women’s rights, the fight for blacks’ civil rights had a long way to go. In the 1920s, Republican President Calvin Coolidge declared that the rights of blacks are “just as sacred as those of any other citizen.” By contrast, when famed sprinter Jesse Owens, a staunch Republican, won four gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, he was snubbed by Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt. Roosevelt only invited white Olympians to the White House. Two decades later, it was a Republican President, Dwight Eisenhower, who sent the 101st Airborne Division to escort black students into Little Rock’s Central High when Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus—a Democrat—refused to honor a court order to integrate the state’s public schools. The Civil Rights Act of 1960, which outlawed poll taxes and other racist measures meant to keep blacks from voting, was filibustered by 18 Democrats for 125 hours. Not one Republican senator opposed the bill. Its follow-up bill, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, is one of the landmark pieces of legislation in American history. That, too, survived a filibuster by Democrats thanks to overwhelming Republican support. But, you might be thinking, all that’s in the past. What have Republicans done for women and blacks lately? The answer you’d hear from professors, journalists and celebrities is... “not much.” And this time, they’d be right. They’d be right because the Republican Party treats blacks and women as it treats everyone: as equals. The Democratic Party never has, and it still doesn’t. Today’s Democrats treat blacks and women as victims who aren’t capable of succeeding on their own. The truth is, this is just a new kind of contempt. So, there is a party with a long history of racism and sexism...but it ain't the Republicans. I’m Carol Swain, for Prager University.

Contents

Overview

Popular vote
Republican
62.56%
Democratic
35.19%
Libertarian
2.21%
Other
0.04%
House seats
Republican
100%
Democratic
0%

District

Results of the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas by district:[2]

District Republican Democratic Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 138,757 68.95% 57,907 28.77% 4,581 2.28% 201,245 100% Republican Hold
District 2 132,125 52.13% 116,135 45.82% 5,193 2.05% 253,453 100% Republican Hold
District 3 148,717 64.78% 74,952 32.65% 6,039 2.57% 229,568 100% Republican Hold
District 4 136,740 66.74% 63,984 31.23% 4,168 2.03% 204,892 100% Republican Hold
Total 556,339 62.56% 312,978 35.19% 19,981 2.25% 889,298 100%

District 1

The incumbent is Republican Rick Crawford, who has represented the district since 2011. Crawford was re-elected with 76% of the vote in 2016. The Democratic nominee is Chintan Desai, a project manager for KIPP.

Democratic primary

Republican primary

General election

Polling

Poll source Dates
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Rick
Crawford (R)
Chintan
Desai (D)
Elvis
Presley (L)
Undecided
Hendrix College September 5–7, 2018 422 ± 4.7% 57% 22% 3% 18%

Results

Arkansas' 1st congressional district, 2018[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rick Crawford (incumbent) 138,757 68.95%
Democratic Chintan Desai 57,907 28.77%
Libertarian Elvis Presley 4,581 2.28%
Total votes 201,245 100%
Republican hold

District 2

The incumbent is Republican French Hill, who has represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected with 58% of the vote in 2016. The Democratic nominee is Clarke Tucker, a state representative.

Arkansas's 2nd district has been included on the initial list of Republican held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[6]

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results, Arkansas 2018[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Clarke Tucker 23,325 57.82%
Democratic Gwen Combs 8,188 20.30%
Democratic Paul Spencer 5,063 12.55%
Democratic Johnathan Dunkley 3,768 9.34%
Total votes 40,344 100%

Republican primary

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
French
Hill (R)
Clarke
Tucker (D)
Joe
Swafford (L)
Undecided
Hendrix College October 17–18, 2018 590 ± 4.0% 51% 40% 2% 7%
Hendrix College September 5–7, 2018 428 ± 4.7% 50% 40% 2% 8%
Public Policy Polling (D) April 16–17, 2018 610 ± 4.0% 47% 42% 11%

Results

Arkansas' 2nd congressional district, 2018[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican French Hill (incumbent) 132,125 52.13%
Democratic Clarke Tucker 116,135 45.82%
Libertarian Joe Swafford 5,193 2.05%
Total votes 253,453 100%
Republican hold

District 3

The incumbent is Republican Steve Womack, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected with 77% of the vote in 2016. The Democratic nominee is Joshua Mahony from Fayetteville, Arkansas. The Libertarian candidate is Michael Kalagias, a retired teacher and volunteer firefighter from Rogers, Arkansas.

Democratic primary

  • Joshua Mahony, president of the Arkansas Single Parent Scholarship Fund and former chairman of the Fayetteville Airport Commission.[13]

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results, Arkansas 2018[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Womack (incumbent) 47,757 84.17%
Republican Robb Ryerse 8,988 15.84%
Total votes 56,745 100%

General election

Polling

Poll source Dates
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Steve
Womack (R)
Josh
Mahony (D)
Michael
Kalagias (L)
Undecided
Hendrix College September 5–7, 2018 428 ± 4.7% 53% 31% 5% 11%

Results

Arkansas' 3rd congressional district, 2018[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Womack (incumbent) 148,717 64.74%
Democratic Joshua Mahony 74,952 32.63%
Libertarian Michael Kalagias 5,899 2.57%
Write-in 140 0.06%
Total votes 229,708 100%
Republican hold

District 4

The incumbent is Republican Bruce Westerman, who has represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected with 75% of the vote in 2016. The Democratic nominee is Hayden Shamel, a teacher from Hot Springs, Arkansas.

Democratic primary

  • Hayden Shamel, Teacher[16]

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results, Arkansas 2018[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bruce Westerman (incumbent) 40,201 79.84%
Republican Randy Caldwell 10,151 20.16%
Total votes 50,352 100%

General election

Polling

Poll source Dates
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bruce
Westerman (R)
Hayden
Shamel (D)
Tom
Canada (L)
Undecided
Hendrix College September 5–7, 2018 423 ± 4.7% 54% 24% 5% 17%

Results

Arkansas' 4th congressional district, 2018[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bruce Westerman (incumbent) 136,740 66.74%
Democratic Hayden Shamel 63,984 31.23%
Libertarian Tom Canada 3,952 1.93%
Write-in 216 0.11%
Total votes 204,892 100%
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ "2016 Arkansas Code: Title 7, Chapter 5, Subchapter 3;  § 7-5-304 - Opening and closing polls -- Time". Justia; US law. Archived from the original on March 9, 2018. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  2. ^ Johnson, Cheryl L. (February 28, 2019). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 2018". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  3. ^ "Chintan Desai Announces Race for AR 1st District Congress Seat". ARKANSASMATTERS. November 17, 2017. Retrieved May 12, 2018.
  4. ^ "FEC Form 2 Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d "2018 Arkansas general election results". Arkansas Secretary of State. Retrieved June 9, 2019.
  6. ^ Cheney, Kyle (January 30, 2017). "Amid Democratic doldrums, DCCC identifies 2018 targets". Politico. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  7. ^ "FEC Form 2 Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  8. ^ Brantley, Max. "A 4th Democratic candidate for 2nd District Congress". Arkansas Times. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  9. ^ THV11 Digital Team (July 13, 2017). "Paul Spencer officially announces campaign to challenge Rep. French Hill". Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  10. ^ Brantley, Max. "Rep. Clarke Tucker announces race for French Hill's 2nd District congressional seat". Arkansas Times. Retrieved May 12, 2018.
  11. ^ a b c "2018 Arkansas primary election results". Retrieved June 9, 2019.
  12. ^ "FEC Form 2 Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  13. ^ DeMillo, Andrew (May 8, 2017). "Arkansas Scholarship Fund Head Says He'll Run for Congress". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  14. ^ Jilani, Zaid (May 19, 2017). "MEET THE PASTOR RUNNING AS A PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICAN TO GET BIG MONEY OUT OF POLITICS". The Intercept. Retrieved September 2, 2017.
  15. ^ "FEC Form 2 Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  16. ^ "FEC Form 2 Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  17. ^ "Forms lacking for 2 Arkansas congressional candidates, FEC says". NWADG.com. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  18. ^ "FEC Form 2 Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). Retrieved July 1, 2019.

External links

Official campaign websites for first district candidates
Official campaign websites for second district candidates
Official campaign websites for third district candidates
Official campaign websites for fourth district candidates
This page was last edited on 9 July 2019, at 22:42
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