To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2018 Virginia elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

During the 2018 election year in Virginia several local, state, and federal elections were held. On May 1, several of Virginia's cities and towns held mayoral, city council, and school board elections. Primary elections for Congress were held on June 12.

On November 6, the state will hold the general election for all 11 of Virginia's House of Representative seats, as well as the Class 1 Senate seat. Virginia's 8th House of Delegates district special election, 2018 will also be held that day. The seat, being vacated by Greg Habeeb, is being sought by Republican Roanoke County Supervisor Joe McNamara and Radford University associate director Democrat Carter Turner.[1]

Special elections were held January 16 for Chilhowie town council, on February 6 for Leesburg town council, and on July 24 for Isle of Wight County sheriff.[2]

Federal elections

United States Senate

On November 6, Virginians re-elected their Class 1 senator Tim Kaine, who will serve from 2019 until 2025. He was challenged by Republican Corey Stewart and Libertarian Matt Waters. The Commonwealth's Green and Constitution parties did not run candidates.

United States Senate election in Virginia, 2018
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic Tim Kaine (incumbent) 1,910,370 57.0%
Republican Corey Stewart 1,374,313 41.0%
Libertarian Matt Waters 61,565 1.84%
Independent (Write-in)
-
5,125 0.15%
Totals 3,351,373
Voter turnout (Voting age population)
Source: [124]

House of Representatives

Virginians will elect their representatives who will serve from 2019 until 2021. Nine of the 11 incumbent Representatives are running for re-election. The Republican Party is defending seven seats, five of which are incumbents, and the Democratic Party is defending four seats, all of whom are incumbents. Ten of the 11 districts feature at least two candidates running, while three districts have third party candidates running.

District Party Incumbent Status Party Candidate Votes % Change {{{change}}}
1 Republican Rob Wittman Running Republican Rob Wittman 183,153 55.18 {{{change}}}
Democratic Vangie Williams 148,355 44.70 {{{change}}}
2 Republican Scott Taylor Running Republican Scott Taylor {{{change}}}
Democratic Elaine Luria {{{change}}}
Independent Shaun Brown {{{change}}}
3 Democratic Bobby Scott Running Democratic Bobby Scott {{{change}}}
Write-in {{{change}}}
4 Democratic Donald McEachin Running Democratic Donald McEachin {{{change}}}
Republican Ryan McAdams {{{change}}}
Libertarian Peter Wells {{{change}}}
5 Republican Tom Garrett Resigned Republican Denver Riggleman {{{change}}}
Democratic Leslie Cockburn {{{change}}}
6 Republican Bob Goodlatte Retired Republican Ben Cline {{{change}}}
Democratic Jennifer Lewis {{{change}}}
7 Republican Dave Brat Running Republican Dave Brat {{{change}}}
Democratic Abigail Spanberger {{{change}}}
Libertarian Joe Walton {{{change}}}
8 Democratic Don Beyer Running Democratic Don Beyer {{{change}}}
Republican Thomas Oh {{{change}}}
9 Republican Morgan Griffith Running Republican Morgan Griffith {{{change}}}
Democratic Anthony Flaccavento {{{change}}}
10 Republican Barbara Comstock Running Republican Barbara Comstock {{{change}}}
Democratic Jennifer Wexton {{{change}}}
11 Democratic Gerry Connolly Running Democratic Gerry Connolly {{{change}}}
Republican Jeff Dove {{{change}}}
Libertarian Stevan Porter {{{change}}}

Ballot measures

There are two state constitutional amendments on the ballot. Both proposed ballot amendments received nearly universal, bipartisan support in the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate.

Property Tax Exemption for Flood Abatement Amendment[3]
Choice Votes %
Result not yet known
Total votes 0
Remove Restriction on Residence for Surviving Spouse of Disabled Veteran Tax Exemption Amendment[4]
Choice Votes %
Result not yet known
Total votes 0

Municipal elections

Board of Supervisors elections

City mayoral elections

The following towns in Virginia held mayoral elections. Most mayoral elections were held on May 1, 2018.[5] City elections in Virginia are officially nonpartisan, parties are only shown if their affiliated party is known.

Town Party Incumbent Status Party Candidate Votes %
Fairfax[6] Independent David L. Meyer Won Independent David L. Meyer 2,167 94.48%
Write-in Write-in 153 5.52%
Franklin[7] Nonpartisan Frank Rabil Won Nonpartisan Frank Rabil 821 76.59%
Write-in Write-in 251 23.41%
Newport News[8] Democratic McKinley L. Price Won Democratic McKinley L. Price 9,399 55.61%
Democratic Santiel Creekmore 921 5.45%
Green Dominique Green 2,017 11.93%
Democratic Marcellus Harris III 4,501 26.63%
Write-in Write-in 63 0.38%
Radford[9] Republican Bruce Brown Retiring Democratic David Horton 1,402 53.82%
Republican Keith Marshall 1,198 45.99%
Write-in Write-in 5 0.19%

Town mayoral elections

The following towns in Virginia held mayoral elections. Most mayoral elections were held on May 1, 2018.[5] Town elections in Virginia are officially nonpartisan, parties are only shown if their affiliated party is known.

Town Party Incumbent Status Party Candidate Votes %
Accomac[10] Nonpartisan Richard Wallace Won Nonpartisan Richard Wallace 21 84.00%
Write-in Write-in 4 16.00%
Appomattox[11] Nonpartisan Paul D. Harvey Won Nonpartisan Paul D. Harvey 65 100%
Write-in Write-in 0 0%
Belle Haven[12] Nonpartisan Marion F. Long Retiring Nonpartisan George H. Ludlow, Jr. 36 94.74%
Write-in Write-in 2 5.26%
Blackstone[13] Nonpartisan Billy Coleburn Won Nonpartisan Billy Coleburn 458 71.90%
Nonpartisan Carolyn Davis 179 28.10%
Boydton[14] Nonpartisan Tommy Coleman[15] Won Nonpartisan Johnny Kirkland 62 96.88%
Write-in Write-in 2 3.13%
Boykins[16] Nonpartisan R. Spier Edwards, Jr.[17] Lost Nonpartisan Danny Ray Bolton 57 39.31%
Nonpartisan R. Spier Edwards Jr. 47 32.41%
Nonpartisan Jerry Rice 41 28.28%
Cape Charles[18] Nonpartisan George Proto[19] Retired Nonpartisan Smitty Dize, Jr. 269 67.59%
Nonpartisan Terry G. Carney 128 32.16%
Write-in Write-in 1 0.25%

References

  1. ^ Friedenberger, Amy (8 August 2018). "Race to replace Del. Greg Habeeb will be contested as Democrat Carter Turner files". Roanoke Times.
  2. ^ "Candidate Lists & Referendums". Virginia Department of Elections.
  3. ^ Lewis, Jr., Lynwood (March 30, 2018). "SB 219 Constitutional amendment; real property tax exemption for flooding remediation, abatement, etc". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  4. ^ Miyares, Jason (March 23, 2018). "HB 71 Constitutional amendment; real property tax exemption for spouse of disabled veteran". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  5. ^ a b "2018 May Town General Elections". results.elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  6. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May City General - Fairfax". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  7. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May City General - Franklin". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  8. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May City General - Newport News". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  9. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May City General - Radford". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  10. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May Town General - Accomac". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  11. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May Town General - Appomattox". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  12. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May Town General - Belle Haven". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  13. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May Town General - Blackstone". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  14. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May Town General - Boydton". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  15. ^ "Contests develop around Mecklenburg for town offices". sovanow.com. March 14, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  16. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May Town General - Boykins". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  17. ^ "Boykins, Virginia: A small town with a big heart" (PDF). Cooperative Living. August 1, 2017. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  18. ^ "Election Results - 2018 May Town General - Cape Charles". elections.virginia.gov. May 1, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  19. ^ Vaughn, Carol (March 9, 2018). "Va. Shore elections: Contested mayor races in three towns". delmarvanow.com. Retrieved June 29, 2018. Mayor George Proto announced earlier he would not seek election to another term.

External links

This page was last edited on 25 February 2019, at 03:27
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.