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2018 New Hampshire Senate election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 New Hampshire Senate elections

← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

All 24 seats in the New Hampshire Senate
13 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
Donna Soucy SNHU 2016 closeup.jpg
No image.svg
Leader Donna Soucy Chuck Morse
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since August 6, 2018 September 3, 2013
Leader's seat 18th 22nd
Last election 10 14
Seats won 14 10
Seat change Increase 4 Decrease 4
Popular vote 296,608 253,412
Percentage 53.8% 45.9%
Swing Increase 4.1% Decrease 4.4%

Results of New Hampshire State Senate elections, 2018.png
Results of New Hampshire Senate elections 2018, by district

President of the Senate before election

Chuck Morse
Republican

Elected President of the Senate

Donna Soucy
Democratic

The 2018 New Hampshire Senate election was held on November 6, 2018, concurrently with the elections for the New Hampshire House of Representatives, to elect members to the 166th New Hampshire General Court. All 24 seats in the New Hampshire Senate were up for election. It resulted in Democrats gaining control of both chambers of the New Hampshire General Court, ending the total control of New Hampshire's state government, that Republicans had held in New Hampshire since the 2016 state elections.

Primary elections were held on September 11, 2018.

Background

In the 2016 New Hampshire state elections, Republicans held on to their majority in the New Hampshire Senate by a margin of 14–10. Republicans also maintained control of the New Hampshire House of Representatives. In addition, Republican Chris Sununu won the open 2016 New Hampshire gubernatorial election giving the New Hampshire Republican Party total control of the state government for the first time since Republican Governor Craig Benson was defeated by Democrat John Lynch in the 2004 New Hampshire gubernatorial election.

In the aftermath of his 2016 election, then president-elect Donald Trump claimed in a tweet that voter fraud had occurred in New Hampshire.[1] In February 2017, Trump advisor Stephen Miller reaffirmed that position by claiming "busing voters in to New Hampshire is widely known by anyone who’s worked in New Hampshire politics".[2] These claims were called "baseless" by several observers.[3]

In response to those allegations, the Republican majorities in the New Hampshire General Court drafted bills changing voter registration rules. Senate Bill 3 (SB 3) passed both chambers of the New Hampshire General Court on party-line votes and was signed in to law by Governor Sununu on July, 10 2017.[4] The new law requires voters to declare a "domicile" in New Hampshire. It also included jail sentences of up to one year or a fine of up to $5,000, if voters registered and not provided necessary paperwork as proof within 10 day or 30 days in smaller towns.[5] Republicans pointed to over 5,000 voters who voted in the 2016 election after identifying with an out-of-state driver's licence, that have not gotten an in-state licence as of September 2017.[6] Democrats suspected a voter suppression scheme, that targeted college students, that they think are most likely to use identification issued by other states.[7]

The League of Women Voters, the New Hampshire Democratic Party and several college students challenged the new law in court.[5] They pointed to the Supreme Court's decision in Symm v. United States, that guaranteed college students the right to vote at their university. The trial judge of the Hillsborough Superior Court decided on October 22, 2018, that the state cannot apply the law in the upcoming elections.[8] The Attorney General of New Hampshire's office then filed an emergency motion with the New Hampshire Supreme Court.[9] The State Supreme Court sided with the state in a unanimous 5-0 decision arguing that overturning the law so close to elections was potentially confusing and disruptive.[10] The State Supreme Court did not decide on the merits of the law in this decision.[9] Therefore, SB3 was first applied in the 2018 elections.

Results

Analysis

In the 2018 elections, Democrats saw gains in state elections across the countries, gaining multiple Governorships and legislative chambers. Democrats also won control of the United States House of Representatives for the first time since 2010. Commentators called the election results a "blue wave", that was especially pronounced in state elections.[11][12]

In the New Hampshire Senate, Democrats were able to flip Districts 9, 11, 12, 23 and 24, while the Republicans flipped District 1. The Democratic gains were mostly in less rural areas in Southern and Eastern New Hampshire while the Republican gains were limited to the rural Senate District 1 in the North Country. The incumbent Democratic Senator in District 1, Jeff Woodburn, had been accused of domestic violence and criminally charged a few months before the election.[13][14]

Overview

14 10
Democratic Republican

Source: Official results.[15]

Parties Candidates Seats Popular Vote
2016 2018 +/- Strength Vote % Change
Democratic 24 10 14 Increase 4 58.33% 296,608 53.77% Increase 4.13%
Republican 23 14 10 Decrease 4 41.67% 253,412 45.94% Decrease 4.42%
Libertarian 3 0 0 Steady
0.00% 1,461 0.26% Increase 0.26%
Independent 1 0 0 Steady
0.00% 1,103 0.03% Increase 0.03%
Total 51 24 24 0 100.00% 551,629 100.00% -

Detailed results

District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14District 15District 16District 17District 18District 19District 20District 21District 22District 23District 24

District 1

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Jeff Woodburn had represented the New Hampshire's 1st State Senate District since 2012. Senator Woodburn had also served as Senate Minority Leader since 2014. Woodburn was arrested on August 2, 2018 on simple assault, domestic violence, criminal mischief, and criminal trespass charges. Democratic Party Chairman Raymond Buckley called on him to resign.[16] On August 6, Woodburn announced he would resign as the minority leader but would remain as a senator.[17] He won the Democratic primary on September 11, 2018, but was defeated by Republican David Starr in the 2018 general election.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 1[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Starr 10,560 54.3
Democratic Jeff Woodburn (incumbent) 8,739 44.9
Independent Kathleen Kelley (write-in) 148 0.8
Total votes 19,447 100
Republican gain from Democratic

District 2

Incumbent Republican State Senator Bob Giuda had represented the New Hampshire's 2nd State Senate District since 2016. He won reelection against Democrat Bill Bolton.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 2[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Giuda (incumbent) 12,127 51.6
Democratic Bill Bolton 11,376 48.4
Total votes 23,503 100
Republican hold

District 3

Incumbent Republican State Senator Jeb Bradley had represented the New Hampshire's 3rd State Senate District since 2009. He won reelection against Democrat Christopher Meier and Libertarian Tania Butler.[18]

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 3[15]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeb Bradley (incumbent) 4,326 77.4
Republican Steven Steiner 1,262 22.6
Total votes 5,588 100
General election
Republican Jeb Bradley (incumbent) 14,841 56.6
Democratic Christopher Meier 10,895 41.5
Libertarian Tania Butler 506 1.9
Total votes 26,242 100
Republican hold

District 4

Incumbent Democrat State Senator David Watters had represented the New Hampshire's 4th State Senate District since 2012. He was reelected without opposition.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 4[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Watters (incumbent) 15,299 100
Total votes 15,299 100
Democratic hold

District 5

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Martha Hennessey had represented the New Hampshire's 5th State Senate District since 2016. She won reelection against Republican Patrick Lozito.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 5[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Martha Hennessey (incumbent) 16,932 71.2
Republican Patrick Lozito 6,862 28.8
Total votes 23,794 100
Democratic hold

District 6

Incumbent Republican State Senator James Gray had represented the New Hampshire's 6th State Senate District since 2016. He won reelection against Democrat Anne Grassie.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 6[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Gray (incumbent) 11,602 54.9
Democratic Anne Grassie 9,537 45.1
Total votes 21,139 100
Republican hold

District 7

Incumbent Republican State Senator Harold F. French had represented the New Hampshire's 7th State Senate District since 2016. He won reelection against Democrat Mason Donovan.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 7[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Harold French (incumbent) 11,616 53.4
Democratic Mason Donovan 10,141 46.6
Total votes 21,757 100
Republican hold

District 8

Incumbent Republican State Senator Ruth Ward had represented the New Hampshire's 8th State Senate District since 2016. She won reelection against Democrat Jenn Alford-Teaster.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 8[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ruth Ward (incumbent) 12,859 51.3
Democratic Jenn Alford-Teaster 12,212 48.7
Total votes 25,071 100
Republican hold

District 9

Incumbent Republican State Senator Andy Sanborn had represented the New Hampshire's 9th State Senate District since 2010. He did not run for reelection in 2018. Instead, he ran unsuccessfully in the Republican primary for New Hampshire's 1st congressional district. The open seat was won by Democrat Jeanne Dietsch against Republican Dan Hynes.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 9[15]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jeanne Dietsch 3,728 54.6
Democratic Mark Fernald 2,219 32.5
Democratic Bruce Fox 884 12.9
Total votes 6,831 100
Republican Dan Hynes 2,699 53.1
Republican Terry Wolf 2,382 46.9
Total votes 5,081 100
General election
Democratic Jeanne Dietsch 14,037 52.4
Republican Dan Hynes 12,776 47.6
Total votes 26,813 100
Democratic gain from Republican

District 10

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Jay Kahn had represented the New Hampshire's 10th State Senate District since 2016. He won reelection against Republican Dan LeClair and Libertarian Ian Freeman.[18]

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 10[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jay Kahn (incumbent) 15,036 65.1
Republican Dan LeClair 7,538 32.7
Libertarian Ian Freeman 507 2.2
Total votes 23,081 100
Democratic hold

District 11

Incumbent Republican State Senator Gary L. Daniels had represented the New Hampshire's 11th State Senate District since 2014. He was defeated for reelection by Democratic State Representative Shannon Chandley.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 11[15]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shannon Chandley 3,917 83.1
Democratic Roger Tilton 797 16.9
Total votes 4,714 100
General election
Democratic Shannon Chandley 13,361 52.3
Republican Gary L. Daniels (incumbent) 12,205 47.7
Total votes 25,566 100
Democratic gain from Republican

District 12

Incumbent Republican State Senator Kevin Avard had represented the New Hampshire's 12th State Senate District since 2014. He was defeated for reelection by former Democratic State Representative Melanie Levesque.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 12[15]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Melanie Levesque 3,727 79.4
Democratic Tom Falter 969 20.6
Total votes 4,696 100
Republican Kevin Avard (incumbent) 3,274 76.1
Republican Richard Dowd 1,028 23.9
Total votes 4,302 100
General election
Democratic Melanie Levesque 12,553 50.3
Republican Kevin Avard (incumbent) 12,384 49.7
Total votes 24,937 100
Democratic gain from Republican

District 13

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Bette Lasky had represented the New Hampshire's 13th State Senate District since 2012. She did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by Democrat Cindy Rosenwald against Republican David Schoneman.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 13[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cindy Rosenwald 11,307 60.9
Republican David Schoneman 7,259 39.1
Total votes 18,566 100
Democratic hold

District 14

Incumbent Republican State Senator Sharon Carson had represented the New Hampshire's 14th State Senate District since 2008. She won reelection against Democrat Tammy Siekmann.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 14[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sharon Carson (incumbent) 12,823 57.6
Democratic Tammy Siekmann 9,424 42.4
Total votes 22,247 100
Republican hold

District 15

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Dan Feltes had represented the New Hampshire's 15th State Senate District since 2014. He won reelection against Republican Pamela Ean.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 15[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Feltes (incumbent) 15,929 66.2
Republican Pamela Ean 8,119 33.8
Total votes 24,048 100
Democratic hold

District 16

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Kevin Cavanaugh had represented the New Hampshire's 16th State Senate District since a 2017 special election. He won reelection in a rematch against former Republican State Senator David Boutin.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 16[15]
Primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Boutin 2,961 60.0
Republican Bill Kuch 1,978 40.0
Total votes 4,939 100
General election
Democratic Kevin Cavanaugh (incumbent) 12,990 52.3
Republican David Boutin 11,853 47.7
Total votes 24,843 100
Democratic hold

District 17

Incumbent Republican State Senator John Reagan had represented the New Hampshire's 17th State Senate District since 2012. He won reelection against Democrat Christoper Roundy.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 17[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Reagan (incumbent) 13,172 55.5
Democratic Christopher Roundy 10,578 44.5
Total votes 23,750 100
Republican hold

District 18

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Donna Soucy had represented the New Hampshire's 18th State Senate District since 2012. She won reelection against Republican State Representative George Lambert.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 18[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donna Soucy (incumbent) 10,276 56.0
Republican George Lambert 8,066 44.0
Total votes 18,342 100
Democratic hold

District 19

Incumbent Republican State Senator Regina Birdsell had represented the New Hampshire's 19th State Senate District since 2014. She won reelection against Democrat Kristina Durocher.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 19[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Regina Birdsell (incumbent) 12,192 56.8
Democratic Kristina Durocher 9,269 43.2
Total votes 21,461 100
Republican hold

District 20

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Lou D'Allesandro had represented the New Hampshire's 20th State Senate District since 1998. D'Allesandro is the longest-serving member of the body. He won reelection against Republican Carla Gericke.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 20[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lou D'Allesandro (incumbent) 9,903 58.4
Republican Carla Gericke 7,047 41.6
Total votes 16,950 100
Democratic hold

District 21

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Martha Fuller Clark had represented the New Hampshire's 21st State Senate District since 2012. She won reelection against Republican Peter Macdonald.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 21[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Martha Fuller Clark (incumbent) 19,084 72.3
Republican Peter Macdonald 7,324 27.7
Total votes 26,408 100
Democratic hold

District 22

Incumbent Republican State Senator Chuck Morse had represented the New Hampshire's 22nd State Senate District since 2010. He won reelection against Democrat Richard O'Shaughnessy and Libertarian Mitch Dyer.[18]

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 22[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chuck Morse (incumbent) 13,571 58.6
Democratic Richard O'Shaughnessy 9,155 39.5
Libertarian Mitch Dyer 448 1.9
Total votes 23,174 100
Republican hold

District 23

Incumbent Republican State Senator Bill Gannon had represented the New Hampshire's 23rd State Senate District since 2014. He was defeated for reelection by Democrat Jon Morgan.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 23[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon Morgan 12,911 50.2
Republican Bill Gannon (incumbent) 12,806 49.8
Total votes 25,717 100
Democratic gain from Republican

District 24

Incumbent Republican State Senator Daniel Innis had represented the New Hampshire's 24th State Senate District since 2016. He was defeated for reelection by Democratic State Representative Tom Sherman.

2018 New Hampshire State Senate election, District 24[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Sherman 15,664 53.1
Republican Daniel Innis (incumbent) 13,832 46.9
Total votes 29,496 100
Democratic gain from Republican

References

  1. ^ "Trump's baseless assertions of voter fraud called 'stunning'". Politico. 27 November 2016. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  2. ^ "Voter Fraud in New Hampshire? Trump Has No Proof and Many Skeptics". New York Times. 13 February 2017. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  3. ^ "No Evidence of Busing Voters to N.H." Factcheck. 14 February 2017. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  4. ^ "Sununu signs controversial GOP voter registration measure into law". WMUR9. 10 July 2017. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Court blocks penalties in new New Hampshire voting law". Politico. 12 September 2017. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  6. ^ "Updated: New voting statistics show 6,540 people registered to vote in NH last year using out-of-state driver's licenses as IDs". WMUR9. 8 September 2017. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  7. ^ "On eve of voter commission hearing in N.H., Bill Gardner in middle of partisan divide". Concord Monitor. 11 September 2017. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  8. ^ "Judge bars New Hampshire proof of residency requirement for new voters". Reuters. 23 October 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  9. ^ a b "N.H. Supreme Court restores registration forms, process of 2017 'proof-of-domicile' law SB 3". WMUR9. 26 October 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  10. ^ "Supreme Court sides with state in SB 3 case". Nashua Telegraph. 27 October 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  11. ^ "The blue wave was big — and significant — in state legislatures". Washington Post. 12 November 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  12. ^ "The Biggest Shift of the Midterms Wasn't in Congress—It Was in the States". Fortune. 12 November 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  13. ^ "In the North Country, a district divided over Sen. Jeff Woodburn". Concord Monitor. 3 November 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  14. ^ "N.H. Lawmaker Accused Of Domestic Violence Loses Reelection Bid". New Hampshire Public Radio. 7 November 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "New Hampshire 2018 General Election Information and Results". New Hampshire Secretary of State. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  16. ^ http://www.unionleader.com/State-senator-facing-nine-criminal-charges State Senator Facing Nine Criminal Charges
  17. ^ "State Senate Democrats choose Soucy to succeed Woodburn as minority leader". WMUR9. 6 August 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  18. ^ a b c "New Hampshire State Senate elections, 2018". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
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