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2018 Minnesota elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A general election was held in the U.S. state of Minnesota on November 6, 2018. All of Minnesota's executive officers were up for election as well as all the seats in the Minnesota House of Representatives, several judicial seats, a United States Senate seat, Minnesota's eight seats in the United States House of Representatives, and several seats for local offices. Special elections were also be held for a Minnesota Senate seat and Minnesota's Class 2 U.S. Senate seat. A primary election to nominate Republican and Democratic–Farmer–Labor (DFL) candidates and several judicial and local primary elections were held on August 14, 2018.

Background

The DFL has held all of Minnesota's executive offices since 2011 after Mark Dayton was elected governor in the 2010 gubernatorial election. They have held the office of attorney general since 1971 and the offices of secretary of state and state auditor since 2007. The Republicans have controlled the Minnesota House of Representatives since 2015 and the Minnesota Senate since 2017.

The DFL has held both of Minnesota's U.S. Senate seats since 2009 when Al Franken defeated Republican incumbent Norm Coleman after a protracted recount following the 2008 election. Lieutenant Governor Tina Smith was appointed in January 2018 to replace Franken after he resigned following sexual harassment allegations. The DFL has held Minnesota's other U.S. Senate seat since 2001, when Mark Dayton defeated Republican incumbent Rod Grams in 2000. Dayton did not seek re-election in the 2006 election and was succeeded by Amy Klobuchar in 2007.

The Republican and DFL parties held caucuses on February 6, 2018, in which eligible voters elected delegates that subsequently endorsed candidates at conventions held later in the year. Both parties also held a nonbinding preference ballot for governor.[1]

Electoral system

Elections for state and federal offices were held via first-past-the-post voting, each producing a single winner. Nominations for parties with major party status, the Republican and DFL parties, were determined by an open primary election. The candidate that won the most votes in each party became their party's nominee in the general election. If only a single candidate sought the nomination for each party, those candidates were automatically nominated and a primary election for that office was not held. Candidates for major parties had automatic ballot access. Candidates for other parties and independents were nominated by petition.

Judicial and local elections were held via the nonpartisan blanket primary. The top-two candidates that won the most votes in the primary election advanced to the general election. If not more than two candidates sought election to the same office, a primary election was not held. In multiple-winner elections, the top number of candidates that won the most votes in the primary election that were twice the number of candidates to be elected advanced to the general election. If not more than twice the number of candidates to be elected sought election, a primary election was not held. Some cities, school districts, and all townships and hospital districts did not hold a primary election, regardless of the number of candidates. Judicial and local elections were nonpartisan.

The candidate filing period was from May 22 through June 5, 2018. The filing period for cities, townships, school districts, and hospital districts that do not hold a primary election was from July 31 through August 14, 2018.[2]

State elections

Executive elections

Governor

Incumbent DFL Governor Mark Dayton did not seek re-election, but was eligible to do so.

Hennepin County Commissioner Jeff Johnson was the Republican nominee and U.S. Representative Tim Walz was the DFL nominee.[3] Other candidates included Grassroots-Legalize Cannabis Party candidate Chris Wright[4] and Libertarian Party candidate Josh Welter.[5] Candidates who lost the primary election for the Republican nomination include former Governor Tim Pawlenty[6] and Matt Kruse.[5] Candidates who lost the primary election for the DFL nomination include State Representative Erin Murphy,[7] Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson,[8] Tim Holden,[5] and Olé Savior.[5] Walz won the election.

Secretary of State

Incumbent DFL Secretary of State Steve Simon announced on January 23, 2018, that he would seek re-election.[9] Former State Senator John Howe was the Republican nominee.[10] William Denney sought election as an Independence Party candidate.[5] Simon won re-election to a second term.

State Auditor

Incumbent DFL State Auditor Rebecca Otto announced on January 9, 2017, that she would not seek re-election and would seek election to be governor.[11]

Former State Representative Pam Myhra was the Republican nominee.[12] Julie Blaha was the DFL nominee.[13] Other candidates included Legal Marijuana Now Party candidate Michael Ford[4] and Libertarian Party candidate Chris Dock.[5] Blaha won the election.[14]

Attorney General

Incumbent DFL Attorney General Lori Swanson announced on January 28, 2018, that she would seek re-election.[15] On June 4, 2018, Swanson announced that she would not seek re-election and instead seek election to be governor.[8]

Former State Representative Doug Wardlow was the Republican nominee and U.S. Representative Keith Ellison was the DFL nominee.[16] Noah Johnson sought election as a Grassroots-Legalize Cannabis Party candidate.[17] Candidates who lost the primary election for the Republican nomination include Sharon Anderson[18] and former State Senator Bob Lessard.[19] Candidates who lost the primary election for the DFL nomination include State Representative Debra Hilstrom,[20] former Ramsey County attorney Tom Foley,[21] Matt Pelikan,[22] and former commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Commerce Mike Rothman.[23] Ellison won the election.

Legislative elections

Minnesota Senate (special election)

A special election was held for District 13 in the Minnesota Senate. The special election determined which political party would control the Senate as the vacancy to be filled left the Senate equally divided between the Republicans and the DFL. Jeff Howe, the Republican nominee, won the special election, preserving a one-seat Republican majority.

Minnesota House of Representatives

All 134 seats in the Minnesota House of Representatives were up for election in 2018. The Republicans held a majority of 77 seats and the DFL held 57 seats prior to the election. The DFL won a majority of 75 seats and the Republicans won 59 seats, ending a four-year Republican majority.

Judicial elections

Four seats on the Minnesota Supreme Court were up for election. Chief Justice Lorie Skjerven Gildea and Justice Barry Anderson both won re-election unopposed. Justices Margaret Chutich and Anne McKeig were both elected in their first election following their appointments. Six seats on the Minnesota Court of Appeals and several seats on the Minnesota District Courts were also up for election.

Justice Chutich faced a challenge from conservative Michelle MacDonald, whom she beat 55.9% to 43.7%. Court of Appeals Justice Lucinda Ellen Jesson faced a challenge from human-rights lawyer Anthony L. Brown, whom she defeated 62.7% to 37.0%.

Federal elections

United States Senate

Class 1

Incumbent DFL Senator Amy Klobuchar sought re-election. State Representative Jim Newberger was the Republican nominee.[24] Other candidates included Green Party candidate Paula Overby[25] and Legal Marijuana Now Party candidate Dennis Schuller.[4] Candidates who lost the primary election for the Republican nomination include Merrill Anderson,[26] Rae Hart Anderson,[26] and Rocky De La Fuente.[26] Candidates who lost the primary election for the DFL nomination include Steve Carlson,[26] Stephen Emery,[26] David Robert Groves,[26] and Leonard Richards.[27] Klobuchar won re-election to a third term.

Class 2 (special election)

On December 7, 2017, incumbent DFL Senator Al Franken announced he would resign.[28] On December 13, DFL Governor Mark Dayton announced that he would appoint Lieutenant Governor Tina Smith to replace Franken,[29] assuming office on January 3, 2018.[30]

Smith sought election to the seat in the special election held alongside the general election to serve the remainder of Franken's term, expiring on January 3, 2021. State Senator Karin Housley was the Republican nominee.[24] Other candidates included Legal Marijuana Now Party candidate Sarah Wellington[4] and independent candidate Jerry Trooien.[31] Candidates who lost the primary election for the Republican nomination include Bob Anderson and[32] Nikolay Bey.[26] Candidates who lost the primary election for the DFL nomination include Richard Painter,[33] Ali Chehem Ali,[26] Gregg Iverson,[26] Nick Leonard,[34] and Christopher Seymore.[26] Smith won election to the remaining two years of Franken's original six-year term.

United States House of Representatives

Minnesota's eight seats in the United States House of Representatives were up for election. The DFL held five seats and the Republicans held three seats prior to the election. Both parties gained and lost two seats, resulting in no net change in the number of seats held by each party.

Local elections

Elections for several subdivisions were held—including elections for counties, municipalities, school districts, and hospital districts.

Counties

All 87 counties held regular elections. 54 counties held primary elections. Seven counties also held special elections on the day of the general election.[35]

All counties held elections for:

Some counties held elections for one or more of the following:

List of counties holding primary elections

Municipalities

826 cities and 638 townships held regular elections. 29 cities held primary elections. 118 cities and 49 townships held special elections. Oakdale and Red Wing held special elections on both days of the primary election and general election. Benson and Saint Paul did not have regularly scheduled elections, but each held a special election on the day of the primary election. All other special elections were held on the day of the general election.[36] Minnetonka Beach and Motley each had a ballot question on the day of the primary election.[37][38] 47 cities and 23 townships had ballot questions on the day of the general election.[39]

Cities held elections for one or more of the following:

  • Mayor (717 cities, including 7 special elections)
  • Half of the members of the city council (825 cities and 115 special elections in 112 cities)
  • Clerk-treasurer (10 cities, including 1 special election)
  • Clerk (42 cities, including 3 special elections)
  • Treasurer (34 cities, including 2 special elections)
  • Half of the members of the public works/utilities/sanitary district board of directors (4 cities)
  • Ballot questions (49 cities)

Townships held elections for one or more of the following:

  • Half of the members of the town board of supervisors (637 townships and 30 special elections in 28 townships)
  • Clerk-treasurer (18 townships)
  • Clerk (212 townships, including 17 special elections)
  • Treasurer (343 townships, including 8 special elections)
  • Ballot questions (23 townships)
List of cities and townships holding elections
  • 1One or more special elections were held on the day of the general election.
  • 2Had one or more ballot questions on the day of the general election.
  • 3A primary election was held.
  • 4One or more special elections were held on the day of the primary election.
  • 5Did not have regularly scheduled elections.
  • 6Had a ballot question on the day of the primary election.

School districts

284 school districts held regular elections to elect half of the members of their board of directors. Six school districts held primary elections. Braham, Eden Prairie, and Holdingford did not have regularly scheduled elections, but each held a special election on the day of the general election. 24 other school districts also held special elections on the day of the general election.[40] Five school districts had ballot questions on the day of the primary election.[41][42][43][44] 56 school districts had ballot questions on the day of the general election.[39]

List of school districts holding elections
  • Ada-Borup1
  • Adrian2
  • Aitkin
  • Albany
  • Albert Lea
  • Alden2
  • Alexandria
  • Annandale
  • Ashby
  • Atwater-Cosmos-Grove City2
  • Austin
  • Badger
  • Bagley
  • Barnesville2, 4
  • Barnum
  • Battle Lake
  • Becker
  • Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa2
  • Bemidji
  • Benson1, 3
  • Bertha-Hewitt
  • Big Lake
  • Blackduck
  • Blue Earth Area
  • BOLD
  • Braham1, 2, 4
  • Brainerd
  • Brandon-Evansville
  • Breckenridge
  • Brooklyn Center
  • Browerville
  • Browns Valley
  • Buffalo Lake-Hector
  • Buffalo-Hanover-Montrose2, 4
  • Burnsville
  • Butterfield
  • Byron
  • Caledonia
  • Cambridge-Isanti
  • Campbell-Tintah
  • Cannon Falls
  • Carlton
  • Cass Lake-Bena
  • Cedar Mountain2
  • Centennial2
  • Chatfield
  • Chisago Lakes
  • Chisholm
  • Chokio-Alberta
  • Clearbrook-Gonvick2
  • Cleveland3
  • Climax
  • Clinton-Graceville-Beardsley
  • Cloquet
  • Columbia Heights2, 5
  • Comfrey
  • Cook County
  • Cromwell-Wright
  • Crookston
  • Crosby-Ironton
  • Dassel-Cokato1, 2
  • Dawson-Boyd
  • Deer River
  • Delano
  • Detroit Lakes2
  • Dilworth-Glyndon-Felton
  • Dover-Eyota
  • Duluth2, 4
  • East Grand Forks
  • Eastern Carver County
  • Eden Prairie1, 4
  • Eden Valley-Watkins2
  • Edgerton2
  • Elk River
  • Ellsworth
  • Ely
  • Esko
  • Eveleth-Gilbert
  • Fairmont Area Schools
  • Faribault
  • Farmington
  • Fergus Falls
  • Fertile-Beltrami
  • Fillmore Central
  • Fisher
  • Floodwood2
  • Foley1
  • Forest Lake2
  • Fosston2
  • Frazee-Vergas2
  • Fulda
  • Gibbon-Fairfax-Winthrop1
  • Glencoe-Silver Lake2
  • Glenville-Emmons2
  • Goodhue2, 4
  • Goodridge
  • Granada Huntley-East Chain
  • Grand Meadow
  • Grand Rapids
  • Greenbush-Middle River
  • Greenway
  • Grygla
  • Hancock2
  • Hawley
  • Hayfield
  • Hendricks
  • Henning
  • Herman-Norcross
  • Hermantown
  • Heron Lake-Okabena2
  • Hibbing1
  • Hill City
  • Hills-Beaver Creek
  • Holdingford1, 2, 4
  • Houston
  • Howard Lake-Waverly-Winsted
  • Hutchinson
  • International Falls
  • Isle
  • Ivanhoe
  • Jackson County Central1
  • Janesville-Waldorf-Pemberton2
  • Jordan1
  • Kasson-Mantorville
  • Kelliher
  • Kenyon-Wanamingo
  • Kerkhoven-Murdock-Sunburg
  • Kimball1
  • Kingsland2
  • Kittson Central
  • La Crescent-Hokah
  • Lac qui Parle Valley
  • Lake Benton
  • Lake City
  • Lake Crystal-Wellcome Memorial
  • Lake of the Woods
  • Lake Park-Audubon1
  • Lake Superior
  • Lakeview
  • Lakeville
  • Lancaster1
  • Lanesboro1, 2
  • Laporte1
  • Le Sueur-Henderson
  • LeRoy-Ostrander2
  • Lester Prairie
  • Lewiston-Altura
  • Litchfield
  • Little Falls
  • Littlefork-Big Falls
  • Long Prairie-Grey Eagle
  • Luverne
  • Lyle
  • Mabel-Canton
  • MACCRAY2
  • Madelia1
  • Mahnomen
  • Mahtomedi2
  • Maple Lake
  • Maple River
  • Marshall
  • Marshall County Central
  • Martin County West
  • McGregor
  • Medford1
  • Melrose
  • Menahga
  • Mesabi East
  • Milaca2
  • Milroy
  • Minneapolis2, 5
  • Minneota
  • Minnewaska1
  • Montevideo
  • Moorhead
  • Moose Lake
  • Mora
  • Morris Area
  • Mountain Iron-Buhl1
  • Mountain Lake3, 4
  • Murray County Central
  • N.R.H.E.G.
  • Nashwauk-Keewatin
  • Nett Lake
  • Nevis
  • New London-Spicer
  • New Prague Area
  • New Ulm
  • New York Mills
  • Nicollet
  • Norman County East
  • Norman County West
  • North Branch1
  • North St. Paul-Maplewood
  • Northfield2
  • Northland Community
  • Ogilvie3, 4
  • Onamia
  • Ortonville
  • Osakis
  • Osseo1
  • Owatonna
  • Park Rapids
  • Parkers Prairie2
  • Paynesville
  • Pelican Rapids
  • Pequot Lakes
  • Perham
  • Pierz
  • Pillager
  • Pine City
  • Pine Island
  • Pine River-Backus
  • Pipestone Area
  • Plainview-Elgin-Millville2
  • Princeton
  • Prior Lake
  • Proctor
  • Randolph2
  • Red Lake County Central1
  • Red Lake Falls
  • Red Lake2, 5
  • Red Rock Central2
  • Red Wing2
  • Redwood Falls Area
  • Renville County West
  • Robbinsdale2
  • Rochester5
  • Rockford2
  • Rocori
  • Roseau
  • Round Lake-Brewster
  • Royalton
  • Rush City2, 4
  • Rushford-Peterson1, 2
  • Saint Paul2, 4
  • Sartell2
  • Sauk Centre
  • Sauk Rapids
  • Sebeka
  • Shakopee
  • Sibley East
  • Sleepy Eye
  • South Koochiching
  • South St. Paul
  • Southland2
  • Spring Grove
  • Springfield
  • St. Charles
  • St. Clair
  • St. Cloud Area5
  • St. Francis
  • St. James
  • St. Louis County
  • St. Michael-Albertville
  • Staples-Motley
  • Stephen-Argyle Central
  • Stewartville
  • Stillwater
  • Swanville
  • Thief River Falls
  • Tracy Area School District
  • Tri-City United
  • Tri-County1
  • Triton2
  • Truman
  • Ulen-Hitterdal
  • Underwood
  • United South Central
  • Upsala
  • Verndale
  • Virginia2
  • Wabasha-Kellogg
  • Wabasso
  • Waconia2
  • Wadena-Deer Creek
  • Walker-Hackensack-Akeley
  • Warren-Alvarado-Oslo
  • Warroad
  • Waseca
  • Watertown-Mayer1
  • Waterville-Elysian-Morristown1, 2
  • Waubun
  • West Central Area2
  • Westbrook-Walnut Grove
  • Wheaton Area
  • Willmar2
  • Willow River
  • Windom
  • Win-E-Mac
  • Winona Area2, 5
  • Worthington3
  • Wrenshall2
  • Yellow Medicine East
  • Zumbrota-Mazeppa
  • 1A special election was held on the day of the general election.
  • 2Had one or more ballot questions on the day of the general election.
  • 3Had one or more ballot questions on the day of the primary election.
  • 4Did not have regularly scheduled elections.
  • 5A primary election was held.

Hospital districts

16 hospital districts held regular elections to elect half of the members of their board of directors. Six hospital districts also held special elections on the day of the general election.[45]

List of hospital districts holding elections
  • Canby Community
  • Cook County
  • Cook-Orr
  • Cuyuna Range1
  • Dawson Area
  • Glacial Ridge
  • Monticello-Big Lake Community1
  • Moose Lake Community
  • North Pine Area1
  • North Suburban
  • Northern Itasca1
  • Paynesville Area
  • Pelican Valley1
  • Perham1
  • Staples Area
  • United
  • 1One or more special elections were held on the day of the general election.

References

  1. ^ "Precinct caucuses". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved January 28, 2018.
  2. ^ "Candidate Filing Periods". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  3. ^ Callaghan, Peter; Kaul, Greta (August 15, 2018). "After victory over Pawlenty, Johnson set to face Walz in governor's race". MinnPost. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d Golden, Erin (June 16, 2018). "Legal pot advocates join Minnesota races for state, federal offices". Star Tribune. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Candidate Filings". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  6. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (April 5, 2018). "Tim Pawlenty makes it official: He's running for governor again". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  7. ^ Condon, Patrick (November 17, 2016). "Erin Murphy, DFL state representative from St. Paul, is first to jump into 2018 governor's race". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  8. ^ a b Coolican, J. Patrick; Golden, Erin (June 4, 2018). "Attorney General Lori Swanson shakes up DFL field in governor's race". Star Tribune. Retrieved June 4, 2018.
  9. ^ Simon, Steve (January 23, 2018). "Steve Simon 2018". Steve Simon for Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved January 29, 2018.
  10. ^ "Howe seeks GOP endorsement for Secretary of State". Red Wing Republican Eagle. April 26, 2018. Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  11. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (January 9, 2017). "State Auditor Rebecca Otto enters 2018 race for governor". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  12. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (January 9, 2018). "Pam Myhra, former state lawmaker, is first Republican in Minnesota state auditor's race". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  13. ^ Golden, Erin (December 11, 2017). "Third DFLer joins race for Minnesota state auditor". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  14. ^ https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2018/11/07/julie-blaha-declared-winner-in-state-auditor-race/
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  16. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (August 14, 2018). "Keith Ellison wins DFL primary for Minnesota attorney general, will face Republican Doug Wardlow". Star Tribune. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  17. ^ Featherly, Kevin (June 14, 2018). "Bar Buzz: Pro-pot AG candidate's got high hopes". Minnesota Lawyer. BridgeTower Media. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  18. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (June 5, 2018). "Ellison joins AG race, DFL hopefuls line up to replace him in Congress". Star Tribune. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  19. ^ Beager, Laurel (June 12, 2018). "'The Old Trapper' seeks state's top legal post". International Falls Journal. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  20. ^ Featherly, Kevin (June 28, 2018). "Debra Hilstrom: 'A work horse, not a show horse'". Minnesota Lawyer. BridgeTower Media. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  21. ^ Featherly, Kevin (July 5, 2018). "Tom Foley: Attorney general job isn't just anti-Trump megaphone". Minnesota Lawyer. BridgeTower Media. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  22. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (September 18, 2017). "Attorney, activist from Northfield seeks DFL running for attorney general". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  23. ^ Featherly, Kevin (June 21, 2018). "DFLer Mike Rothman says he's ready from day one". Minnesota Lawyer. BridgeTower Media. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  24. ^ a b Keen, Judy (August 15, 2018). "Sen. Tina Smith holds off Richard Painter, will face Karin Housley in historic matchup". Star Tribune. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  25. ^ McMullen, Maureen (November 11, 2017). "Transgender candidate announces U.S. Senate campaign in Minn., seeking Green Party endorsement". Duluth News Tribune. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Candidate Filings". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  27. ^ Walsh, Paul (July 13, 2018). "Imprisoned double murderer is on Minnesota ballot vying for Klobuchar's Senate seat". Star Tribune. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  28. ^ Rao, Maya (December 8, 2017). "As Sen. Al Franken prepares to leave Senate, he leaves real accomplishments, much undone". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  29. ^ Golden, Erin; Coolican, J. Patrick (December 13, 2017). "Gov. Mark Dayton appoints Tina Smith to U.S. Senate". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  30. ^ Rao, Maya (January 3, 2018). "Al Franken submits resignation letter to Senate; Tina Smith ready to step in". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  31. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (April 16, 2018). "Controversial developer Jerry Trooien running for U.S. Senate as independent". Star Tribune. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  32. ^ Pugmire, Tim (January 17, 2018). "Second GOP candidate seeks to unseat Smith". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  33. ^ Keen, Judy (April 30, 2018). "Richard Painter exits GOP, launches bid against DFL Sen. Tina Smith". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  34. ^ Magan, Christopher (February 5, 2018). "Fellow Democrat Nick Leonard to challenge Tina Smith for Senate seat". Pioneer Press. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  35. ^ "Candidate Filings". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  36. ^ "Candidate Filings". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved November 4, 2018.
  37. ^ "2018 Bond Referendum and Infrastracture Improvements". City of the Village of Minnetonka Beach. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  38. ^ "City of Motley Newsletter" (PDF). City of Motley. Summer 2018. p. 1. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  39. ^ a b "Ballot Questions". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved November 4, 2018.
  40. ^ "Candidate Filings". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  41. ^ "School to seek approval of $26.3 million building bond". Swift County Monitor-News. May 18, 2018. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  42. ^ Murtha, Ashley (March 20, 2018). "Cleveland board sets Aug. 14 referendum date". Le Center Leader. Adams Publishing Group. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  43. ^ "Building Project". Mountain Lake Public Schools. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  44. ^ Sobotka, Alyssa (April 27, 2018). "District 518 calls for two-question August referendum". The Globe. Forum Communications. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
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External links

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