To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2018 Connecticut State Senate election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2018 Connecticut Senate election

← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

All 36 seats in the Connecticut State Senate
19 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
Martin Looney (13247063774).png
Leader Martin Looney Len Fasano
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since January 7, 2015 January 7, 2015
Last election 18 18
Seats won 23 13
Seat change Increase 5 Decrease 5
Popular vote 725,644 593,346
Percentage 53.8% 43.4%
Swing Increase 4.5% Decrease 2.9%

2018 Connecticut State Senate Election.svg
  Democratic hold
  Democratic gain
  Republican hold

President pro tempore of the Senate before election

Martin Looney
Democratic

Elected President pro tempore of the Senate

Martin Looney
Democratic

The 2018 Connecticut Senate election was held on November 6, 2018, concurrently with the elections for the Connecticut House of Representatives, to elect members to the Connecticut General Assembly. All 36 seats in the Connecticut Senate were up for election. The election resulted in Democrats expanding control in both chambers of the Connecticut General Assembly, ending the split control in the Senate, that had been in place since the 2016 elections. Primary elections were held on August 14, 2018.

Background

2016 General Election

In the 2016 Connecticut State Senate election, Democrats lost their 21-15 majority as Republican achieved a net gain of three seats.[1] The resulting 18-18 tie made procedural changes necessary. A power-sharing agreement was reached dividing control of the chamber, splitting the committees 50-50 and giving power to the Republicans to call procedural votes to bring legislation to the chamber floor, while Democratic Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman retained the ability to break tied votes.[2]

2017 Special Elections

On January 4, 2017, shortly before the begin of 2017 legislative session, two State Senators resigned in order to pursue other offices. Democratic Senator Eric Coleman and Republican Senator Rob J. Kane resigned to pursue other state offices just minutes before the opening of the session in a deal of the parties which retained the partisan balance of the State Senate.[3]

Coleman was nominated by Governor Dannel Malloy for a judgeship on the Superior Court and was confirmed in May 2018 by the State Senate in a 23-13 vote and the State House in a close 74-72 vote. Opponents of his nomination argued that because of the budget crisis the State could not afford the judges.[4][5] Rob Kane was appointed as the Republican Auditor of Public Accounts, a post overseeing an agency that exist twice and is a patronage post of both parties in General Assembly. Kane was confirmed by the State House by a voice vote and the State Senate by a 32-1 vote. He serves with Democrat John C. Geragosian. His predecessor Robert Ward had retired in December 2016.[6]

On February 28, 2017, Democratic State Representative Douglas McCrory was elected to Coleman's seat by a 72-25 margin against Republican nominee Michael McDonald while Republican State Representative Eric Berthel was elected to Kane’s seat by a 54-44 margin against Democratic nominee Greg Cava. Therefore, the special elections did not alter the partisan makeup of the Senate which remained tied 18-18.

2017 Budget conflict

On July 1, 2017, Connecticut entered its fiscal year without an enacted budget for the first time since 2009. A government shutdown was avoided by an executive order by Governor Dannel Malloy.[7] The executive order imposed funding cuts to road repairs, school districts and non-profit organizations among other cuts.[8] In June 2017, House and Senate Democrats had been unable to even agree on a provisional budget, while Republicans offered an budget that included savings due to changes to the collective bargaining of state employees.[9] Among Democrats legislators, a liberal faction tried to avoid cuts to social security while a moderate faction tried to avoid tax increases.[10]

At the beginning of July 2017, Connecticut budget deficit was estimated to be around $5.1 billion (equivalent to $5.3 billion in 2019).[7] After negotiations with state employee union leaders, Governor Malloy announced an agreement that achieved a $1.57 billion (equivalent to $1.64 billion in 2019) saving while extending the contract's end date to 2027. On July 18, it was announced that the unions' members had approved the agreement by a margin of 83 percent to 17 percent.[11] On July 24, the Connecticut House of Representatives approved the deal by a 78-72 vote, with all Republican Representatives and Democrat John Hampton opposed.[12] On July 31, 2017, Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman had to break a 18-18 tie in the Connecticut Senate in favor of the agreement.[13] The approval of the Connecticut General Assembly made it possible for the agreement to take effect in the same fiscal year and not in the next.

On September 15, 2017, three Democratic Senators, Paul Doyle, Joan Hartley and Gayle Slossberg, unexpectedly broke with their caucus and voted in favor of a Republican budget plan, that passed the Connecticut Senate by a 21-15 vote.[14] At around 3 AM in the morning of September 16, 2017, the Connecticut House of Representative also passed the Republican proposal by a 77-73 with five Democratic Representatives, John Hampton, Pat Boyd, Lonnie Reed, Daniel S. Rovero and Kim Rose, defecting from their caucus.[15] Governor Malloy vowed to veto the plan because of its cuts to higher education, which he did on September 28, 2017.[16][17] On October 13, 2017, Standard & Poor's notified the state that it had changed the outlook on its general debt from "stable" to "negative".[18]

On October 18, 2017, Democratic and Republican legislative leaders announced that they had come to an agreement on a two-year budget without input from Governor Malloy. The deal included no increases to the state's income and sales taxes, while increasing a tax for hospital providers from 6% to 8%, increasing the cigarette tax and adding a $10 surcharge for motor vehicle registrations and a $0.25 fee for Uber and Lyft rides. They also agreed upon a $40 million dollar bailout for the city of Hartford, restoring the funding of municipalities and schools, while cutting $65 million dollar in funding for the University of Connecticut and reducing available tax credits. In addition it put caps on spending and borrowing by the state and require the General Assembly to vote on all state employee union contracts, both Republican priorities.[19]

On October 26, 2017, the Connecticut Senate passed the compromise budget by a vote of 33-3, while the Connecticut House of Representatives passed it by a 126-33 vote.[19][20] On October 31, 2017, Governor Malloy signed most of the budget, while using his line-item veto to block the increase of the hospital provider fee. This hospital tax get reimbursed by federal government through Medicaid funding. According to the Governor, the wording of the budget had flaws which would cause the state to lose around $1 billion on the tax increase.[21] On November 14, 2017, the Connecticut Senate passed a bill supported by Governor Malloy that clarified the wording of the hospital provider fee by a 34-0 vote.[22] The bill also passed the Connecticut House of Representatives on November 15, 2017 by a 123-12 vote.[23]

The budget crisis caused Connecticut to have no budget for 123 days, the longest period without a budget in state history.[24][25]

Results

Analysis

Connecticut can be considered a "blue state" that has supported the Democratic nominee for President in every election since 1992 and in which Democrats outnumber Republican by a ratio of 5 to 3 in voter registration. Nevertheless, the 2018 elections for Governor and General Assembly were considered competitive as the budget woes and a struggling economy in the state made incumbent Governor Dan Malloy very unpopular.[26] Polls also showed that President Trump had a low approval rating in the State, which affect down-ballot elections.[27]

Connecticut Democrats were able to capitalize more on the Anti-Trump sentiment than their Republican counterparts could with Anti-Malloy sentiment. In the Connecticut Senate, Democrats were able to win districts in traditionally Republican strongholds by among others flipping multiple legislative seats in Fairfield County. The senate district along Connecticut's Gold Coast (District 36) elected a Democrat for the first time in nearly 90 years.[28]

In the 2018 elections, Democrats saw gains in state elections across the countries, gaining multiple Governorships and legislative chambers. Democrats also won control of the United States House of Representatives for the first time since 2010. Commentators called the election results a "blue wave", that was especially pronounced in state elections.[29][30]

Overview

23 13
Democratic Republican

Source: Official results.[31]

Parties Candidates Seats Popular Vote
2016 2018 +/- Strength Vote % Change
Democratic 36 18 23 Increase 5 63.89% 725,644 53.10% Increase 4.52%
Republican 34 18 13 Decrease 5 36.11% 593,346 43.42% Decrease 2.92%
Independent Party 1 [a] 0 0 Steady
0.00% 26,513 1.94% Decrease 0.74%
Working Families 0 [b] 0 0 Steady
0.00% 19,966 1.46% Decrease 0.57%
Green 3 0 0 Steady
0.00% 1,077 0.08% Decrease 0.15%
Total 74 36 36 0 100.00% 1,366,546 100.00% -

By district

District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14District 15District 16District 17District 18District 19District 20District 21District 22District 23District 24District 25District 26District 27District 28District 29District 30District 31District 32District 33District 34District 35District 36

District 1

Incumbent Democratic State Senator John Fonfara had represented the Connecticut's 1st State Senate District since 1997. He won reelection against Republican Barbara Ruhe and Green candidate Barbara Barry.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 1[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Fonfara (incumbent) 15,612 74.0
Republican Barbara Ruhe 5,044 23.9
Green Barbara Barry 447 2.1
Total votes 21,103 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Douglas McCrory had represented the Connecticut's 2nd State Senate District since 2017. He won reelection unopposed.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 2[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Douglas McCrory (incumbent) 26,542 100.0
Total votes 26,542 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Timothy Larson had represented the Connecticut's 3rd State Senate District since 2015. He won reelection against Republican Jennifer L. Lovett, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 3[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Timothy Larson (incumbent) 22,018 60.7
Total Jennifer L. Lovett 14,260 39.3
Republican Jennifer L. Lovett 13,464 37.1
Independent Jennifer L. Lovett 796 2.2
Total votes 36,278 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Steve Cassano, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, had represented the Connecticut's 4th State Senate District since 2011. He won reelection against Republican State Representative Mark Tweedie, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 4[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Steve Cassano (incumbent) 23,257 54.2
Democratic Steve Cassano 22,303 52.0
Working Families Steve Cassano 954 2.2
Total Mark Tweedie 19,632 45.8
Republican Mark Tweedie 18,612 43.4
Independent Mark Tweedie 1,020 2.4
Total votes 42,889 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Beth Bye had represented the Connecticut's 5th State Senate District since 2011. She won reelection against Republican Philip Chabot, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 5[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Beth Bye (incumbent) 30,988 65.7
Total Philip Chabot 16,192 34.3
Republican Philip Chabot 15,471 32.8
Independent Philip Chabot 721 1.5
Total votes 47,180 100.0
Democratic hold

District 6

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Terry Gerratana, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, had represented the Connecticut's 6th State Senate District since 2011. She won reelection against Republican Robert Medley.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 6[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Terry Gerratana (incumbent) 17,173 62.6
Democratic Terry Gerratana 16,087 58.6
Working Families Terry Gerratana 1,086 4.0
Republican Robert Smedley 10,263 37.4
Total votes 27,436 100.0
Democratic hold

District 7

Incumbent Republican State Senator John Kissel, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 7th State Senate District since 1993. He won reelection against former Democratic State Representative Annie Hornish, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 7[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total John Kissel (incumbent) 22,004 54.4
Republican John Kissel 21,072 52.1
Independent John Kissel 932 2.3
Total Annie Hornish 18,476 45.6
Democratic Annie Hornish 17,416 43.0
Working Families Annie Hornish 1,060 2.6
Total votes 40,480 100.0
Republican hold

District 8

Incumbent Republican State Senator Kevin Witkos, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 8th State Senate District since 2009. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Melissa Osborn.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 8[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Kevin Witkos (incumbent) 26,418 56.8
Republican Kevin Witkos 25,242 54.3
Independent Kevin Witkos 1,176 2.5
Democratic Melissa Osborn 20,091 43.2
Total votes 46,509 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Paul Doyle had represented the Connecticut's 9th State Senate District since 2011. He did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by Democratic State Representative Matt Lesser, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, against Republican Ed Charamut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 6[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Matt Lesser 24,253 57.8
Democratic Matt Lesser 22,734 54.2
Working Families Matt Lesser 1,519 3.6
Republican Ed Charamut 17,674 42.2
Total votes 41,927 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Gary Winfield, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, had represented the Connecticut's 10th State Senate District since 2014. He won reelection against Republican Douglas Losty.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 10[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Gary Winfield (incumbent) 20,182 88.0
Democratic Gary Winfield 19,284 84.1
Working Families Gary Winfield 898 3.9
Republican Douglas Losty 2,745 12.0
Total votes 22,927 100.0
Democratic hold

District 11

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Martin Looney had represented the Connecticut's 11th State Senate District since 1993. He won reelection against Republican Erin Reilly.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 11[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Martin Looney (incumbent) 23,787 77.9
Republican Erin Reilly 6,758 22.1
Total votes 30,545 100.0
Democratic hold

District 12

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Ted Kennedy, Jr. had represented the Connecticut's 12th State Senate District since 2015. He did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by former Democrat Christine Cohen, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, against Republican Adam Greenberg, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 12[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Christine Cohen 25,265 51.4
Democratic Christine Cohen 24,289 49.4
Working Families Christine Cohen 976 2.0
Total Adam Greenberg 23,933 48.6
Republican Adam Greenberg 22,967 46.7
Independent Adam Greenberg 966 2.0
Total votes 49,198 100.0
Democratic hold

District 13

Incumbent Republican State Senator Len Suzio, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 13th State Senate District since 2017. He was defeated for reelection by Democratic nominee Mary Daugherty Abrams, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 13[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Mary Daugherty Abrams 19,502 52.4
Democratic Mary Daugherty Abrams 18,381 49.4
Working Families Mary Daugherty Abrams 1,121 3.0
Total Len Suzio (Incumbent) 17,708 47.6
Republican Len Suzio 16,866 45.3
Independent Len Suzio 842 2.3
Total votes 37,210 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 14

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Gayle Slossberg had represented the Connecticut's 14th State Senate District since 2005. She did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by former Democratic State Representative James Maroney, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, against Republican State Representative Pam Staneski.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 14[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total James Maroney 21,926 51.2
Democratic James Maroney 20,502 47.9
Working Families James Maroney 854 2.0
Independent James Maroney 570 1.3
Republican Pam Staneski 20,888 48.8
Total votes 42,814 100.0
Democratic hold

District 15

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Joan Hartley had represented the Connecticut's 15th State Senate District since 2001. He won reelection against Independent Party of Connecticut nominee James Russell.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 15[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joan Hartley (incumbent) 16,426 84.7
Independent James Russell 2,963 15.3
Total votes 19,389 100.0
Democratic hold

District 16

Incumbent Republican State Senator Joe Markley had represented the Connecticut's 16th State Senate District since 2011. He did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by Republican Rob Sampson, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, against Democratic nominee Vickie Orsini Nardello, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 16[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Rob Sampson 23,988 56.7
Republican Rob Sampson 23,099 54.6
Independent Rob Sampson 889 2.1
Total Vickie Orsini Nardello 18,332 43.3
Democratic Vickie Orsini Nardello 17,162 40.6
Working Families Vickie Orsini Nardello 1,170 2.8
Total votes 42,320 100.0
Republican hold

District 17

Incumbent Republican State Senator George Logan, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 17th State Senate District since 2017. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Jorge Cabrera, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party. The apparent winner changed after election night and was decided by a recount.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 17[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total George Logan (incumbent) 18,531 50.1
Republican George Logan 17,544 47.4
Independent George Logan 987 2.7
Total Jorge Cabrera 18,446 49.9
Democratic Jorge Cabrera 17,623 47.7
Working Families Jorge Cabrera 823 2.2
Total votes 36,977 100.0
Republican hold

District 18

Incumbent Republican State Senator Heather Somers, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 18th State Senate District since 2017. She won reelection against Democratic nominee Robert Statchen, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party. The apparent winner changed after election night and was decided by a recount.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 18[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Heather Somers (incumbent) 20,887 54.7
Republican Heather Somers 19,584 51.3
Independent Heather Somers 1,303 3.4
Total Robert Statchen 17,276 45.3
Democratic Robert Statchen 16,502 43.2
Working Families Robert Statchen 774 2.0
Total votes 38,163 100.0
Republican hold

District 19

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Catherine Osten, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, had represented the Connecticut's 19th State Senate District since 2011. She won reelection against Republican Mark Lounsbury, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 19[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Catherine Osten (incumbent) 21,389 57.9
Democratic Catherine Osten 19,769 53.5
Working Families Catherine Osten 1,620 4.4
Total Mark Lounsbury 15,567 42.1
Republican Mark Lounsbury 14,817 40.1
Independent Mark Lounsbury 750 2.0
Total votes 36,956 100.0
Democratic hold

District 20

Incumbent Republican State Senator Paul Formica, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 20th State Senate District since 2015. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Martha Marx, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 20[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Paul Formica (incumbent) 20,746 52.0
Republican Paul Formica 19,598 49.1
Independent Paul Formica 1,148 2.9
Total Martha Marx 19,164 48.0
Democratic Martha Marx 18,203 45.6
Working Families Martha Marx 961 2.4
Total votes 39,910 100.0
Republican hold

District 21

Incumbent Republican State Senator Kevin C. Kelly had represented the Connecticut's 21st State Senate District since 2011. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Monica Tujak Brill.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 21[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin C. Kelly (incumbent) 24,589 56.7
Democratic Monica Tujak Brill 18,805 43.3
Total votes 43,394 100.0
Republican hold

District 22

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Marilyn Moore, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, had represented the Connecticut's 22nd State Senate District since 2011. She won reelection against Republican Rich Deecken, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 22[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Marilyn Moore (incumbent) 19,795 59.1
Democratic Marilyn Moore 19,130 57.1
Working Families Marilyn Moore 665 2.0
Total Rich Deecken 13,712 40.9
Republican Rich Deecken 13,155 39.3
Independent Rich Deecken 557 1.7
Total votes 33,507 100.0
Democratic hold

District 23

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Edwin Gomes had represented the Connecticut's 23rd State Senate District since 2015. He did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by Democratic nominee Dennis Bradley against Republican John Rodriguez.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 23[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dennis Bradley (incumbent) 14,456 86.8
Republican John Rodriguez 2,199 13.2
Total votes 16,655 100.0
Democratic hold

District 24

Incumbent Republican State Senator Michael McLachlan, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 24th State Senate District since 2009. He was defeated for reelection by Democratic nominee Julie Kushner, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 24[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Julie Kushner 17,186 54.0
Democratic Julie Kushner 16,400 51.5
Working Families Julie Kushner 786 2.5
Total Michael McLachlan (incumbent) 14,658 46.0
Republican Michael McLachlan 14,077 44.2
Independent Michael McLachlan 581 1.8
Total votes 31,844 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 25

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Bob Duff, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, had represented the Connecticut's 25th State Senate District since 2005. He won reelection against Republican Mark Marc D'Amelio, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 25[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Bob Duff (incumbent) 24,444 63.2
Democratic Bob Duff 23,629 61.0
Working Families Bob Duff 815 2.1
Total Marc D'Amelio 14,261 36.8
Republican Marc D'Amelio 13,627 35.2
Independent Marc D'Amelio 634 1.6
Total votes 38,705 100.0
Democratic hold

District 26

Incumbent Republican State Senator Toni Boucher, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 26th State Senate District since 2009. She was defeated for reelection by Democratic nominee Will Haskell.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 26[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Will Haskell 28,159 53.4
Total Toni Boucher (incumbent) 24,574 46.6
Republican Toni Boucher 23,525 35.2
Independent Toni Boucher 1,049 1.6
Total votes 52,733 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 27

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Carlo Leone had represented the Connecticut's 27th State Senate District since 2011. He won reelection against Republican Jerry Bosak, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, and Green candidate Cora Santaguida.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 27[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carlo Leone (incumbent) 22,161 64.8
Total Jerry Bosak 11,649 34.1
Republican Jerry Bosak 11,101 32.5
Independent Jerry Bosak 548 1.6
Green Cora Santaguida 392 1.1
Total votes 34,202 100.0
Democratic hold

District 28

Incumbent Republican State Senator Tony Hwang, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 28th State Senate District since 2015. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Michelle Lapine McCabe, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 30[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Tony Hwang (incumbent) 25,277 52.0
Republican Tony Hwang 24,105 49.6
Independent Tony Hwang 1,172 2.4
Total Michelle Lapine McCabe 23,336 48.0
Democratic Michelle Lapine McCabe 22,610 46.5
Working Families Michelle Lapine McCabe 726 1.5
Total votes 48,613 100.0
Republican hold

District 29

Incumbent Democratic State Senator Mae Flexer, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party, had represented the Connecticut's 29th State Senate District since 2011. He won reelection against Republican David Coderre, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 29[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Mae Flexer (incumbent) 18,915 56.3
Democratic Mae Flexer 17,794 53.0
Working Families Mae Flexer 1,121 3.3
Total David Coderre 14,679 43.7
Republican David Coderre 13,706 40.8
Independent David Coderre 973 2.9
Total votes 33,594 100.0
Democratic hold

District 30

Incumbent Republican State Senator Craig Miner, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 30th State Senate District since 2017. He won reelection against Democratic nominee David Lawson, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party. The apparent winner changed after election night and was decided by a recount.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 30[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Craig Miner (incumbent) 23,121 53.6
Republican Craig Miner 22,068 51.2
Independent Craig Miner 1,053 2.4
Total David Lawson 20,011 46.4
Democratic David Lawson 19,039 44.1
Working Families David Lawson 972 2.3
Total votes 43,132 100.0
Republican hold

District 31

Incumbent Republican State Senator Henri Martin, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 31st State Senate District since 2015. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Christopher Wright.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 31[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Henri Martin (incumbent) 22,367 58.7
Republican Henri Martin 21,317 55.9
Independent Henri Martin 1,050 2.8
Democratic Christopher Wright 15,762 41.3
Total votes 38,129 100.0
Republican hold

District 32

Incumbent Republican State Senator Eric Berthel had represented the Connecticut's 32nd State Senate District since 2017. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Catherine De Carli.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 32[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Eric Berthel (incumbent) 27,598 61.2
Democratic Catherine De Carli 17,501 38.8
Total votes 45,099 100.0
Republican hold

District 33

Incumbent Republican State Senator Art Linares had represented the Connecticut's 33rd State Senate District since 2013. He did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by Democratic nominee Norm Needleman against Republican Melissa Ziobron, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 33[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Norm Needleman 25,280 50.1
Total Melissa Ziobron 25,195 49.9
Republican Melissa Ziobron 23,906 47.4
Independent Melissa Ziobron 1,289 2.6
Total votes 50,475 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 34

Incumbent Republican State Senator Len Fasano, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 34th State Senate District since 2003. He won reelection against Democratic nominee Aili McKeen.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 34[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Total Len Fasano (incumbent) 23,853 58.5
Republican Len Fasano 22,826 56.0
Independent Len Fasano 1,027 2.5
Democratic Aili McKeen 16,939 41.5
Total votes 40,792 100.0
Republican hold

District 35

Incumbent Republican State Senator Tony Guglielmo had represented the Connecticut's 35th State Senate District since 1993. He did not run for reelection in 2018. The open seat was won by Republican Dan Champagne against Democrat John Perrier, who was also the nominee of the Working Families Party and the Independent Party of Connecticut.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 35[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Champagne 22,837 51.0
Total John Perrier 21,938 49.0
Democratic John Perrier 19,999 44.7
Working Families John Perrier 1,065 2.4
Independent John Perrier 874 2.0
Total votes 44,775 100.0
Republican hold

District 36

Incumbent Republican State Senator Scott Frantz, who was also the nominee of the Independent Party of Connecticut, had represented the Connecticut's 36th State Senate District since 2009. He was defeated for reelection by Democratic nominee Alexandra Kasser.

2018 Connecticut State Senate election, District 36[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alexandra Kasser 22,261 50.4
Total Scott Frantz (incumbent) 21,645 49.0
Republican Scott Frantz 21,002 47.6
Independent Scott Frantz 643 1.5
Green Megan Cassano 238 0.5
Total votes 44,144 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

Aftermath

Reactions

The Hartford Courier called the results a "growing rout for Republicans in Connecticut".[28] Democratic Senate President Martin Looney called the election a "big night for Democrats".[32] Looney also saw the "Trump factor" as a reason for the Democrats' success. Governor Malloy commented the results saying that Connecticut voters “unequivocally rejected the hateful politics and backwards policies espoused by the Trump administration and national Republicans.”[33]

After the election, several Republicans criticized the state party's strategy and field operations during the 2018 state elections. Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton, who finished second in the 2018 Republican primary for Governor, criticized the unwillingness of state Republicans to distance themselves from President Trump, who was unpopular in the state. He said: "We let Trump take over this race. It became a referendum on Trump and you’re not going win that way."[34]

Recounts

In the 17th State Senate district, after election night results showing State Senator George Logan trailing his Democratic challenger Jorge Cabrera by over 200 votes. After reporting mistakes in Ansonia were corrected showing Logan lead the race by 65 votes. The recount increased the margin of victory to 85 votes. Democrats considered further legal actions but chose not pursue them, after Cabrera conceded to Logan on November 14, 2018.[35][36]

In the 33rd State Senate district, election night results showed Democrat Norman Needleman beating by 303 votes, outside of the automatic recount margin.[37] According to state law, an automatic recount is required if the margin of victory is smaller than 0.5% or less than 20 votes. The Essex Registrar of Voters had reported incorrect returns to the Secretary of State's office. The corrected results showed Norman Needleman leading by just 137 votes, triggering an automatic recount. The recount did not change the result but further reduced the margin of victory to 85 votes.[37]

2019 Legislative Session

Three Democratic State Senators, Tim Larson, Beth Bye and Terry Gerratana, resigned on January 8, 2019 in order to join newly elected Governor Ned Lamont's administration.[38][39] These resignation reduced the Democratic majority to 20-13. According to state law, a special election must be conducted to fill the vacant seats. The governor must call for an election no later than 10 days after the vacancy happens. All special elections must be held no later than 46 days after a governor's declaration. The special elections were held on February 26, 2019. Democrats Saud Anwar and Derek Slap won the 3rd and 5th State Senate district respectively, while Republican Gennaro Bizzarro flipped the 6th State Senate district.[39] The special elections thus resulted in a 22-14 Democratic majority.[40]

On January 9, 2019, 33 Senators and 149 State Representatives were sworn in as members of the Connecticut General Assembly. The newly-elected General Assembly was sworn in with the most female members of all time.[41]

References

  1. ^ In addition, the Independent Party of Connecticut cross-endorsed 26 candidates, 2 Democrats and 24 Republicans.
  2. ^ In addition, the Working Families Party of Connecticut cross-endorsed 20 candidates, all Democrats.
  1. ^ Pazniokas, Mark (November 8, 2016). "GOP ties Democrats in state Senate, closes gap in House". The CT Mirror. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  2. ^ Pazniokas, Mark (December 22, 2016). "Deal gives Democrats edge in evenly split CT Senate". The CT Mirror. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  3. ^ Pazniokas, Mark (January 4, 2017). "Coleman, Kane resign minutes before session opens". The CT Mirror. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  4. ^ Keating, Christopher (May 1, 2018). "Senate Approves Eric Coleman as New Superior Court Judge". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  5. ^ Keating, Christopher (May 3, 2018). "Former Sen. Eric Coleman Barely Approved by House As Judge". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  6. ^ Pazniokas, Mark (February 1, 2017). "Rob Kane confirmed as Republican state auditor". The CT Mirror. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  7. ^ a b De Avila, Joseph (July 5, 2017). "Connecticut Budget Deal Unlikely Before July 18, Governor Says". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  8. ^ Altimari, Daniela (July 5, 2017). "Budget Stalemate Causes Pain For Cities And Towns". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  9. ^ Phaneuf, Keith M. (June 27, 2017). "House, Senate Democrats unable to agree on provisional budget". The CT Mirror. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  10. ^ Keating, Christopher (June 28, 2017). "Malloy Urges House Leaders To Approve Temporary Budget Plan As Deadline Looms". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved June 28, 2017.
  11. ^ Keating, Christopher (July 18, 2017). "Employee Unions Endorse Concession Deal by Huge Margin, 83 to 17 Percent". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  12. ^ Keating, Christopher (July 24, 2017). "House Narrowly Approves State Worker Labor Concessions". The Hartford Courier. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  13. ^ Altimari, Daniela; Ormseth, Matt (July 31, 2017). "Wyman Casts Tiebreaking Vote To Approve Union Concessions Deal". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  14. ^ Keating, Christopher (September 17, 2017). "Connecticut At A Turning Point As Republicans Gain Upper Hand In Budget Crisis". Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  15. ^ "With 5 More Democrat Votes, House Forwards GOP Budget to Malloy; Veto Expected". CT News Junkie. September 16, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  16. ^ "Connecticut governor vows veto of GOP-backed budget plan". Boston.com. September 16, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  17. ^ Phaneuf, Keith M.; Pazniokas, Mark (September 28, 2017). "Malloy vetoes budget, seeks 'honest dialogue'". The CT Mirror. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  18. ^ Stuart, Christine (October 13, 2017). "Wall Street Sends Connecticut A Warning". CT News Junkie. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  19. ^ a b Keating, Christopher (October 26, 2017). "Senate Overwhelmingly Backs Bipartisan State Budget, House Votes Later Thursday". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  20. ^ Altimari, Daniela (October 26, 2017). "House Approves Bipartisan Budget With Veto-Proof Majority". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved October 26, 2017.
  21. ^ Altimari, Daniela; Keating, Christopher (October 31, 2017). "Malloy Signs Portions Of Budget Bill But Rejects Hospital Tax". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  22. ^ Keating, Christopher (November 14, 2017). "Connecticut State Senate Approves Changes To State Budget". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  23. ^ Phaneuf, Keith M. (November 15, 2017). "House gives final approval to CT budget fix". The CT Mirror. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  24. ^ "After 123 Days, Connecticut Finally Has a Budget". NBC Connecticut. October 31, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  25. ^ Rojas, Rick (October 31, 2017). "Connecticut Adopts a Budget After Months of Debate and Delays". New York Times. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  26. ^ Foderaro, Lisa W. (October 29, 2018). "In Connecticut, What's Worst: Trump, Gov. Malloy or the Economy?". The New York Times. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  27. ^ Keating, Christopher (September 21, 2018). "Poll: Donald Trump's Approval Rating In Connecticut Is 34 Percent. But It's Much Higher Than The Governor's". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  28. ^ a b Keating, Christopher; Gosselin, Kenneth R. (November 7, 2018). "General Assembly: Democrats Capture State Senate And Increase Majority In House". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  29. ^ "The blue wave was big — and significant — in state legislatures". Washington Post. 12 November 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  30. ^ "The Biggest Shift of the Midterms Wasn't in Congress—It Was in the States". Fortune. 12 November 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak Statement of Vote. General Election. November 6, 2018 (PDF). Hartford, CT: State of Connecticut. Secretary of State. 2018.
  32. ^ "The Latest: Dems make gains in Connecticut General Assembly". Associated Press. November 7, 2018. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  33. ^ Kramer, Jack (November 7, 2018). "Democrats Discuss Agenda Following Big Gains In House, Senate". CT News Junkie. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  34. ^ Vigdor, Neil (November 9, 2018). "Soul Searching Begins For Connecticut Republicans After Election Rout". The Hartford Courier. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  35. ^ Keating, Christopher (November 8, 2018). "Democrats threaten legal action as state Senate race heads to recount". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  36. ^ "Logan remains winner after recount". Citizen's News. November 14, 2018. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  37. ^ a b "Recount called in 33rd state Senate District race". CT Mirror. November 19, 2018. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  38. ^ Merrill, Denise W. (January 9, 2019). "Secretary Merrill Receives the Resignation of State Senators Beth Bye, Terry Gerratana, and Tim Larson". Connecticut Secretary of the State. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  39. ^ a b Bussemaker, Nathalie (February 27, 2019). "CT holds special elections for the CGA and the state Senate". Yale Daily News. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  40. ^ Pazniokas, Mark (February 26, 2019). "GOP flips two legislative seats in five special elections". CT Courier. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  41. ^ Munson, Emilie (January 15, 2019). "New General Assembly sworn in with "ambitious goals"". Connecticut Post. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
This page was last edited on 15 February 2021, at 03:04
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.