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2016 Wisconsin elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2016 Wisconsin elections

← 2015
2017 →

The Wisconsin general elections, 2016 were held in the U.S. state of Wisconsin on November 8, 2016.[1] One of Wisconsin's U.S. Senate seats and all eight seats in the United States House of Representatives are up for election, as well as half of the Wisconsin Senate seats and all of the Wisconsin Assembly seats. Primary elections were held on August 9, 2016.[2]

The Wisconsin Republican Party made large gains in the 2016 election. Businessman and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump won Wisconsin in an upset, becoming the first Republican to win the state since 1984.[3][4] Additionally, the state GOP had a strong showing in the State Legislature, building their largest majorities since 1957,[3][5] and Republican Senator Ron Johnson defeated Russ Feingold a second time for a second term.[3][6] This put Walker and the Wisconsin GOP in a strong position.[7]

Wisconsin Republicans also celebrated the victory of Justice Rebecca Bradley in the April election for Wisconsin Supreme Court. Bradley had been appointed to the court in 2015 after the death of Justice N. Patrick Crooks, who had been seen as a swing vote on the court.[8]

Federal

President

Senate

In a rematch of the 2010 election, first term incumbent Republican Ron Johnson ran against former Democratic U.S. Senator Russ Feingold.[9] Johnson defeated Feingold in the general election with 50.2% of the vote.[10]

House of Representatives

All of Wisconsin's eight United States House of Representatives seats were up for election in 2016. Party composition remained unchanged after the general election.

District Incumbent Elected Defeated Democratic Republican Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 Paul Ryan Paul Ryan Ryan Solen (D)
Jason Lebeck (Lib)
107,003 30.21% 230,072 64.95% 17,170 4.85% 354,245 12.77% Republican Hold
District 2 Mark Pocan Mark Pocan Peter Theron (R) 273,537 68.72% 124,044 31.16% 479 0.12% 398,060 14.35% Democratic Hold
District 3 Ron Kind Ron Kind Ryan Peterson (Ind) 257,401 98.86% 0 0.0% 2,969 1.14% 260,370 9.39% Democratic Hold
District 4 Gwen Moore Gwen Moore Andy Craig (Lib)
Robert R. Raymond (Ind)
220,181 76.74% 0 0.0% 66,728 23.26% 286,909 10.34% Democratic Hold
District 5 Jim Sensenbrenner Jim Sensenbrenner Khary Penebaker (D)
John Arndt (Lib)
114,477 29.29% 260,706 66.70% 15,661 4.01% 390,844 14.09% Republican Hold
District 6 Glenn Grothman Glenn Grothman Sarah Lloyd (D)
Jeff Dahlke (Ind)
133,072 37.26% 204,147 57.15% 19,964 5.59% 357,183 12.88% Republican Hold
District 7 Sean Duffy Sean Duffy Mary Hoeft (D) 138,643 38.27% 223,418 61.67% 210 0.06% 362,271 13.06% Republican Hold
District 8 Reid Ribble Mike Gallagher Tom Nelson (D)
Wendy Gribben (Green)
135,682 37.30% 227,892 62.65% 206 0.06% 363,780 13.12% Republican Hold
Total 1,379,996 49.75% 1,270,279 45.80% 123,387 4.45% 2,773,662 100.00%

State

Legislature

State Senate

The 16 even-numbered districts out of 33 seats in the Wisconsin Senate were up for election in 2016. Nine of these seats were held by Republicans and seven were held by Democrats. Prior to the election, Republicans controlled the chamber with a 19 to 14 majority, but they gained a seat in the election.

Senatorial district Incumbent This race Results
District Senator Party First
elected
Incumbent Status Candidates[11] Winner[12]
2 Robert Cowles Republican 1987 Running Robert Cowles (Republican)
John Powers (Democratic)
Robert Cowles
65%
4 Lena Taylor Democrat 2005 Running Lena Taylor (Democrat) Lena Taylor
100%
6 Nikiya Harris Democrat 2013 Not Running La Tonya Johnson (Democrat) LaTonya Johnson
100%
8 Alberta Darling Republican 1993 Running Alberta Darling (Republican) Alberta Darling
100%
10 Sheila Harsdorf Republican 2001 Running Sheila Harsdorf (Republican)
Diane Odeen (Democrat)
Sheila Harsdorf
63%
12 Tom Tiffany Republican 2013 Running Tom Tiffany (Republican)
Bryan Van Stippen (Democrat)
Tom Tiffany
63%
14 Luther Olsen Republican 2004 Running Luther Olsen (Republican)
Brian Smith (Democrat)
Luther Olsen
57%
16 Mark F. Miller Democrat 2005 Running Mark Miller (Democrat) Mark Miller
100%
18 Rick Gudex Republican 2013 Not Running Dan Feyen (Republican)
Mark Harris (Democrat)
Dan Feyen
56%
20 Duey Stroebel Republican 2015 Running Duey Stroebel (Republican) Duey Stroebel
100%
22 Robert Wirch Democrat 1997 Running Robert Wirch (Democrat) Robert Wirch
100%
24 Julie Lassa Democrat 2003 Running Patrick Testin (Republican)
Julie Lassa (Democrat)
Patrick Testin
52%
26 Fred Risser Democrat 1962 Running Fred Risser (Democrat) Fred Risser
100%
28 Mary Lazich Republican 1998 Not Running Dave Craig (Republican) Dave Craig
100%
30 Dave Hansen Democrat 2001 Running Dave Hansen (Democratic)
Eric Wimberger (Republican)
Dave Hansen
51%
32 Jennifer Shilling Democrat 2011 Running Jennifer Shilling (Democrat)
Dan Kapanke (Republican)
Chip DeNure (Independent)
Jennifer Shilling
49%

State Assembly

All 99 seats of the Wisconsin State Assembly were up for election in November. Nine Assemblymen (6 Republicans, 3 Democrats) did not seek re-election.[11]

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic Vacant
Before 2016 elections 63 36 99 0
Latest voting share 64% 36%
After 2016 elections 64 35 99 0
Latest voting share 65% 35%

Judiciary

State Supreme Court

Incumbent Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley defeated Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals in the April general election. Justice Bradley had been appointed to the court in 2015 by Governor Scott Walker, to replace Justice N. Patrick Crooks, who had died in office. Justice Crooks' term was already set to expire in 2016, thus no special election needed to be scheduled.[13]

Milwaukee County Circuit Court Judge M. Joseph "Joe" Donald was also a candidate in this election, but did not advance from the February primary election.

Though Wisconsin judicial elections are nonpartisan, Justice Bradley's victory was seen as an important win for the Republican party, as she claims a judicial philosophy aligned with conservative judges like Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, and she had been endorsed by Republican-aligned interest groups such as the National Rifle Association and Wisconsin Right to Life.[14] Justice Crooks, who she was replacing, was seen as a swing vote on the court, so this was a net gain for the conservative bloc on the court.

Wisconsin Supreme Court Election, 2016[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Primary Election, February 16, 2016
Nonpartisan Rebecca Bradley (incumbent) 251,823 44.61%
Nonpartisan JoAnne Kloppenburg 243,190 43.16%
Nonpartisan M. Joseph Donald 68,373 12.12%
Scattering 631 0.11%
Total votes '567,038' '100.0%'
General Election, April 5, 2016
Nonpartisan Rebecca Bradley (incumbent) 1,020,092 52.23%
Nonpartisan JoAnne Kloppenburg 928,377 47.53%
Scattering 4,678 0.24%
Total votes '1,953,147' '100.0%'

State Court of Appeals

All four districts of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals had a seat up for election in 2016. None of the races were contested.

  • In District I, Judge Joan F. Kessler was elected to her third term without opposition.
  • In District II, Judge Paul F. Reilly was elected to his second term without opposition.
  • In District III, Judge Thomas Hruz was elected to his first full term, after being appointed to the court by Governor Scott Walker in 2014.
  • In District IV, Judge Brian Blanchard was elected to his second term without opposition.

State Circuit Courts

Forty of the state's 249 circuit court seats were up for election in 2020. Ten of those seats were contested. Three incumbent judges were defeated—Milwaukee County judges Paul Rifelj and Michelle Ackerman Havas, and Eau Claire County judge Brian H. Wright. All three defeated judges had been appointed by Governor Scott Walker.

Circuit Branch Incumbent Elected Defeated Defeated in Primary
Name Votes % Name Votes % Name(s)
Barron 1 James C. Babler James C. Babler 12,364 99.66%
Crawford James P. Czajkowski Lynn Marie Rider 4,327 99.63%
Dane 3 Jim Troupis Valerie L. Bailey-Rihn 132,270 99.10%
4 Amy Smith Everett Mitchell 132,939 99.14%
5 Nicholas J. McNamara Nicholas J. McNamara 131,068 99.19%
14 C. William Foust John D. Hyland 130,198 99.23%
15 Stephen Ehlke Stephen Ehlke 130,754 99.27%
17 Peter C. Anderson Peter C. Anderson 129,643 99.23%
Eau Claire 1 Brian H. Wright John F. Manydeeds 18,850 55.35% Brian H. Wright 15,132 44.43%
Fond du Lac 2 Peter L. Grimm Peter L. Grimm 25,290 100.00%
4 Gary R. Sharpe Gary R. Sharpe 25,020 100.00%
Iowa William D. Dyke Margaret M. Koehler 4,546 51.21% Timothy B. McKinley 4,315 48.61% Larry Nelson
Tim Angel
Juneau 1 John Pier Roemer John Pier Roemer 6,384 99.72%
Kewaunee Dennis J. Mleziva Keith A. Mehn 4,096 51.66% Jeffrey Ronald Wisnicky 3,832 48.34% Andrew Naze
Lincoln 1 Jay R. Tlusty Jay R. Tlusty 7,844 99.27%
Marathon 2 Greg Huber Greg Huber 37,240 99.56%
Milwaukee 5 Mary M. Kuhnmuench Mary M. Kuhnmuench 171,093 98.72%
14 Christopher R. Foley Christopher R. Foley 175,825 98.91%
25 Stephanie Rothstein Stephanie Rothstein 168,070 98.83%
31 Paul Rifelj Hannah C. Dugan 132,461 64.90% Paul Rifelj 70,098 34.35%
34 Glenn H. Yamahiro Glenn H. Yamahiro 167,132 98.83%
44 Daniel L. Konkol Gwen Connolly 167,479 98.93%
45 Michelle Ackerman Havas Jean Marie Kies 100,409 49.86% Michelle Ackerman Havas 99,225 49.28%
Monroe 2 Mark L. Goodman Mark L. Goodman 11,260 99.68%
3 J. David Rice J. David Rice 11,100 99.61%
Oconto 2 Jay Conley Jay Conley 11,890 100.00%
Pierce Joseph D. Boles Joseph D. Boles 10,309 100.00%
Portage 2 Robert J. Shannon Robert J. Shannon 12,551 54.22% Trish Baker 10,515 45.42% David R. Knaapen
Jared Redfield
Racine 2 Eugene A. Gasiorkiewicz Eugene A. Gasiorkiewicz 40,407 100.00%
4 John S. Jude Mark Nielsen 34,573 71.84% Joseph W. Seifert 13,554 28.16%
Rock 2 Alan Bates Alan Bates 35,354 99.29%
Rusk 2 Steven P. Anderson Steven P. Anderson 2,542 52.29% Richard J. Summerfield 2,319 47.71%
St. Croix 4 R. Michael Waterman R. Michael Waterman 18,333 99.34%
Sauk 1 Michael Screnock Michael Screnock 15,773 100.00%
2 James Evenson Wendy J. N. Klicko 10,757 53.36% Kevin R. Calkins 9,403 46.64%
Vilas Neal A. Nielsen III Neal A. Nielsen III 7,354 99.27%
Walworth 2 James L. Carlson Daniel S. Johnson 16,420 54.80% Dan Necci 13,385 44.67% Shannon Wynn
4 David M. Reddy David M. Reddy 24,024 99.14%
Winnebago 3 Barbara Hart Key Barbara Hart Key 41,909 99.23%
5 John A. Jorgensen John A. Jorgensen 40,795 99.29%

Local

Milwaukee

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-06-17. Retrieved 2016-07-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-07-14. Retrieved 2016-07-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ a b c Bauer, Scott (November 9, 2016). "Republicans Build Majorities in Legislature". The Charlotte Observer (from the Associated Press). Archived from the original on November 10, 2016. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  4. ^ Kueppers, Courtney (November 8, 2016). "Trump Becomes First Republican Presidential Candidate Since 1984 To Win Wisconsin". Wisconsin Public Radio. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  5. ^ Marley, Patrick; Stein, Jason (November 9, 2016). "GOP Strengthens Hold on Legislature". Sheboygan Press. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  6. ^ Schleifer, Theodore (November 8, 2016). "Ron Johnson Earns Surprise GOP Win in Wisconsin Senate Race". CNN. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  7. ^ Litke, Eric (November 10, 2016). "5 Wisconsin Winners in Trump Tidal Wave". The Post-Crescent. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  8. ^ DeFour, Matthew (October 10, 2015). "Scott Walker appoints Rebecca Bradley to Supreme Court". Wisconsin State Journal. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  9. ^ Mikkelson, Marti (July 5, 2016). "Candidates Ramp up the Rhetoric in Wisconsin Senate Race". WUWM.
  10. ^ "2016 General Election" (PDF). State of Wisconsin. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 20, 2016.
  11. ^ a b "Candidate List for the August 9, 2016 Primary Election" (PDF). Wisconsin Government Accountability Board. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 7, 2016. Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  12. ^ "County by County Report - State Senate" (PDF). Wisconsin Elections Commission. November 29, 2016. Retrieved December 17, 2016.
  13. ^ Beck, Molly (April 6, 2016). "Rebecca Bradley elected to state Supreme Court". Wisconsin State Journal. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  14. ^ "NRA Endorses Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley" (PDF) (Press release). Fairfax, Virginia: National Rifle Association. March 29, 2016. Retrieved April 18, 2020 – via The Wheeler Report.
  15. ^ "Elections Results". Wisconsin Blue Book 2017-2018 (Report). Madison, Wisconsin: State of Wisconsin. 2017. pp. 508, 511. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
This page was last edited on 16 January 2021, at 16:20
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