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2016 United States presidential election in Washington (state)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2016 United States presidential election in Washington

← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout78.76% Decrease2.49% [1]
 
Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg
Gary Johnson June 2016.jpg
Nominee Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Gary Johnson
Party Democratic Republican Libertarian
Home state New York New York New Mexico
Running mate Tim Kaine Mike Pence Bill Weld
Electoral vote 8 0 0
Popular vote 1,742,718 1,221,747 160,879
Percentage 54.30% 38.07% 5.01%

Washington Presidential Election Results 2016.svg
County results
Clinton:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Trump:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

Results by county showing number of votes by size and candidates by color
Results by county showing number of votes by size and candidates by color
Treemap of the popular vote by county
Treemap of the popular vote by county

The 2016 United States presidential election in Washington was won by Hillary Clinton on November 8, 2016, with 52.6% of the vote over Donald Trump's 36.9%. All of Washington's 12 electoral votes were assigned to Clinton, though four defected. Trump prevailed in the presidential election nationally.

In the presidential primaries, Washington voters chose Democratic and Republican parties' nominees, and Green Party nominee was chosen in a convention.

Background

Washington has voted for the Democratic candidate in every presidential election since 1988. While the state's Senate was majority Republican in 2016, both of Washington's United States Senators are Democrats, as well as a majority of the state's U.S. House delegation. Barack Obama defeated John McCain by 17.08% in 2008 and Mitt Romney by 14.93% in 2012.

Primary elections

Democratic caucus

County results of the Washington Democratic presidential caucus, 2016.   Bernie Sanders
County results of the Washington Democratic presidential caucus, 2016.
  Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders bested Hillary Clinton in the Democratic presidential caucus on March 26, 2016:

The state also held a non-binding presidential primary on May 24 along with the Republican primary that same date. Hillary Clinton won the preference vote.

Washington Democratic caucuses, March 26, 2016
Candidate District delegates Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Bernie Sanders 19,159 72.72% 74 0 74
Hillary Clinton 7,140 27.10% 27 10 37
Others
Uncommitted 46 0.18% 0 7 7
Total 26,345 100% 101 17 118
Source: The Green Papers
Washington Democratic primary, May 24, 2016
Candidate Popular vote Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Hillary Clinton 420,461 52.38% 0 0 0
Bernie Sanders 382,293 47.62% 0 0 0
Others
Uncommitted
Total 802,754 100% 0 0 0
Source: Washington Secretary of State - Official Results

Republican primary

Four candidates appeared on the Republican presidential primary ballot on May 24, 2016:

Washington Republican primary, May 24, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
Donald Trump 455,023 75.46% 41 0 41
Ted Cruz (withdrawn) 65,172 10.81% 0 0 0
John Kasich (withdrawn) 58,954 9.78% 0 0 0
Ben Carson (withdrawn) 23,849 3.96% 0 0 0
Uncommitted 3 0 3
Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
Total: 602,998 100.00% 44 0 44
Source: The Green Papers

Green convention

This state's Green Party state convention was on May 15. Ballots were emailed to members within a week after the convention.[2]

Washing Green Party Convention, May 15, 2016.
Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
Jill Stein - 91.7 5
William Kreml - - -
Sedinam Kinamo Christin Moyowasifza Curry - - -
Kent Mesplay - - -
Darryl Cherney - - -
Total - - 5

General election

Polling

State voting history

Washington joined the Union in November 1889 and has participated in all elections from 1892 onwards.

Since 1900, Washington voted Democratic 51.72 percent of the time and Republican 44.83 percent of the time. Since 1988, Washington had voted for the Democratic Party in each presidential election, and the same was expected to happen in 2016.[3]

Results

United States presidential election in Washington, 2016[4]
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Hillary Clinton Tim Kaine 1,742,718 54.30% 8
Republican Donald Trump Mike Pence 1,221,747 38.07% 0
Libertarian Gary Johnson William Weld 160,879 5.01% 0
Write-ins 102,416 3.23% 0
Green Jill Stein Ajamu Baraka 58,417 1.82% 0
Constitution Darrell Castle Scott Bradley 17,623 0.55% 0
Socialist Workers Alyson Kennedy Osborne Hart 4,307 0.13% 0
Socialism and Liberation Gloria La Riva Eugene Puryear 3,523 0.11% 0
Republican Colin Powell 0 0.00% 3
Independent Faith Spotted Eagle Winona LaDuke 0 0.00% 1
Totals (excluding write-ins) 3,209,214 100.00% 12

Analysis

Hillary Clinton won the election in Washington with 54.3 percent of the vote, a slightly reduced percentage from President Obama in 2012. However, Washington was among the states in which Hillary Clinton outperformed Barack Obama's winning margin in 2012, despite the Democratic nominee losing the Electoral College this time. [5] Donald Trump received 38.1 percent of the vote. This was the first presidential election in which the Republican Party won Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties since 1928 and 1952 respectively.[6][7] It was also the first time the GOP had won Cowlitz County since Ronald Reagan in 1980, and the first Republican win in Mason County since Reagan in 1984.[8]

Despite Clinton's victory, four Democratic electors defected. Three voted for Colin Powell, making him the first African-American Republican to receive electoral votes, while a Native American activist cast his vote for Faith Spotted Eagle, making her the first Native American to receive an electoral vote for president.

Powell became the first Republican to receive electoral votes from Washington state since Ronald Reagan in 1984.[8] However, overall it was the eighth consecutive election in which Washington voted Democratic, and the twelfth in a row in which it voted the same way as neighboring Oregon.

By county

County Clinton% Clinton# Trump% Trump# Others (excluding write-ins)% Others (excluding write-ins)# Total
Adams County 28.32% 1,299 67.21% 3,083 5.64% 262 4,644
Asotin County 32.59% 3,134 59.70% 5,741 8.84% 861 9,736
Benton County 33.26% 26,360 59.55% 47,194 8.09% 6,473 80,027
Chelan County 39.34% 13,032 54.68% 18,114 6.69% 2,234 33,380
Clallam County 45.19% 17,677 48.04% 18,794 7.57% 2,986 39,457
Clark County 46.70% 92,757 46.54% 92,441 7.48% 14,962 200,160
Columbia County 24.37% 526 69.37% 1,497 7.29% 159 2,182
Cowlitz County 39.60% 17,908 53.48% 24,185 7.88% 3,599 45,692
Douglas County 31.89% 4,918 62.28% 9,603 6.58% 1,022 15,543
Ferry County 30.94% 1,098 62.05% 2,202 8.36% 301 3,601
Franklin County 37.87% 8,886 56.28% 13,206 6.86% 1,628 23,720
Garfield County 22.65% 279 69.07% 851 9.31% 116 1,246
Grant County 27.89% 7,810 66.12% 18,518 7.12% 2,018 28,346
Grays Harbor County 42.78% 12,020 50.06% 14,067 8.04% 2,280 28,367
Island County 49.26% 20,960 43.39% 18,465 8.05% 3,451 42,876
Jefferson County 62.82% 12,656 29.97% 6,037 7.81% 1,583 20,276
King County 72.32% 718,322 21.78% 216,339 6.39% 63,838 998,499
Kitsap County 51.28% 63,156 39.80% 49,018 9.77% 12,143 124,317
Kittitas County 39.81% 7,489 53.69% 10,100 7.21% 1,366 18,955
Klickitat County 39.33% 4,194 54.29% 5,789 7.30% 786 10,769
Lewis County 28.54% 9,654 65.02% 21,992 7.33% 2,503 34,149
Lincoln County 22.00% 1,244 72.66% 4,108 6.32% 361 5,713
Mason County 43.16% 11,993 49.22% 13,677 8.56% 2,403 28,073
Okanogan County 37.24% 6,298 56.82% 9,610 6.92% 1,183 17,091
Pacific County 43.52% 4,620 50.49% 5,360 6.87% 736 10,716
Pend Oreille County 28.74% 1,934 64.99% 4,373 7.28% 495 6,802
Pierce County 49.95% 172,538 42.51% 146,824 8.36% 29,123 348,485
San Juan County 66.85% 7,172 25.05% 2,688 8.48% 914 10,774
Skagit County 48.07% 26,690 44.55% 24,736 8.12% 4,542 55,968
Skamania County 39.97% 2,232 52.44% 2,928 8.49% 479 5,639
Snohomish County 54.60% 185,227 37.81% 128,255 8.38% 28,691 342,173
Spokane County 41.75% 93,767 50.50% 113,435 8.82% 20,044 227,246
Stevens County 25.78% 5,767 67.78% 15,161 7.71% 1,749 22,677
Thurston County 53.62% 68,798 37.90% 48,624 9.26% 11,988 129,410
Wahkiakum County 35.60% 832 57.51% 1,344 7.72% 182 2,358
Walla Walla County 38.52% 9,694 54.24% 13,651 8.16% 2,074 25,419
Whatcom County 55.47% 60,340 37.32% 40,599 7.96% 8,734 109,673
Whitman County 47.66% 8,146 43.31% 7,403 10.15% 1,756 17,305
Yakima County 40.61% 31,291 54.16% 41,735 6.08% 4,724 77,750

By congressional district

Clinton won 7 of 10 congressional districts.[9]

District Trump Clinton Representative
1st 38% 54% Suzan DelBene
2nd 35% 57% Rick Larsen
3rd 49% 43% Jaime Herrera Beutler
4th 58% 35% Dan Newhouse
5th 52% 39% Cathy McMorris Rodgers
6th 40% 52% Derek Kilmer
7th 12% 82% Jim McDermott
Pramila Jayapal
8th 45% 48% Dave Reichert
9th 23% 71% Adam Smith
10th 40% 51% Dennis Heck

See also

References

  1. ^ Secretary of State: Kim Wyman. "Election Results and Voters Pamphlets". www.sos.wa.gov. Retrieved 2019-06-09.
  2. ^ https://www.facebook.com/events/965157636872423/
  3. ^ Washington Presidential Election 2016 Results LIVE Updates
  4. ^ "November 8, 2016 General Election Results (Washington)". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  5. ^ "Washington Election Results 2016". The New York Times. 2017-08-01. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-06-09.
  6. ^ http://results.vote.wa.gov/results/20161108/pacific/
  7. ^ Wheel, Robert. "The 2016 Streak Breakers". Center for Politics. Larry J. Sabato’s Crystal Ball. Retrieved 13 November 2016.
  8. ^ a b Sullivan, Robert David; ‘How the Red and Blue Map Evolved Over the Past Century’; America Magazine in The National Catholic Review; June 29, 2016
  9. ^ Results (PDF). wei.sos.wa.gov (Report). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2018-06-30.

External links

This page was last edited on 30 November 2019, at 04:27
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