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2016 United States House of Representatives elections in New Hampshire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in New Hampshire

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

Both New Hampshire seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 1 1
Seats won 2 0
Seat change 1 Increase 1 Decrease
Popular vote 336,575 316,149
Percentage 46.96% 44.11%
Swing Decrease4.50% Decrease4.27%

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in New Hampshire were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the two U.S. Representatives from the state of New Hampshire, one from each of the state's two congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on September 13.

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Transcription

Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy event of the week. Each week our staff of educators tries to introduce you to a person of interest in the financial world. This could be a person in government or banking or an important investors or trader. Over the next coming months ITA will take a look into each US Presidential candidate. In this video we are going to take a look at Rand Paul United States Senator and presidential hopeful. Senator Rand Paul, M.D. is one of the nation’s leading advocates for liberty. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 2010, Dr. Paul has proven to be an outspoken champion for constitutional liberties and fiscal responsibility. As a fierce advocate against government overreach, Rand has fought tirelessly to return government to its limited, constitutional scope. A devoted husband and father, Dr. Paul and his family live in Bowling Green, Ky., where Rand owned his own ofthalmology practice and performed eye surgery for 18 years. As a hard-working and dedicated physician - not a career politician - Rand Paul came to Washington to shake things up and to make a difference. Mr. Paul will try to put together a disparate coalition of voters: the libertarian faithful who supported his father, former Representative Ron Paul, in 2008 and 2012; Tea Party adherents drawn to his small-government fiscal conservatism; and some who are not even Republicans, like college students and blacks, groups he has been wooing for a year and a half. The question is whether the parts add up to a whole. Many of his father’s supporters believe that Mr. Paul has sold them out by trying too hard to appeal to mainstream Republicans. Tea Party conservatives could be peeled away by Senator Ted Cruz of Texas or Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin. And getting people who have never voted Republican to do so is no small task, especially when many caucuses and primaries are open only to registered Republicans. Mr. Paul’s viability will be judged on whether he can win one of the first four states with nominating contests: Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada or South Carolina. He has a strong campaign operation in Iowa. But with such a crowded field there, he may do better in New Hampshire, a libertarian-leaning state where his father placed second in 2012 and the unaffiliated voters he is courting are free to cast primary ballots.

Contents

District 1

The 1st district covers the southeastern part of the state and consists of three general areas: Greater Manchester, the Seacoast and the Lakes Region. The incumbent is Republican Frank Guinta, who has represented the district since 2015 and previously from 2011 to 2013. He was elected with 52% of the vote in 2014, defeating Democratic incumbent Carol Shea-Porter, and the district has a PVI of R+1.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Shawn O'Connor, businessman[1][2]
  • Carol Shea-Porter, former U.S. Representative who held the seat from 2007 to 2011, and again from 2013 to 2015[3]
Potential

Results

Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carol Shea-Porter 32,409 98.8
Democratic Write-ins 386 1.2
Total votes 32,795 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrawn
Endorsements
Richard Ashooh

Results

Republican primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Frank Guinta (incumbent) 26,400 46.5
Republican Richard Ashooh 25,678 45.2
Republican Michael Callis 2,243 4.0
Republican Robert Risley 1,347 2.4
Republican Jamieson Gradert 1,031 1.8
Republican Write-ins 111 0.1
Total votes 56,810 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Frank
Guinta (R)
Carol
Shea-Porter (D)
Other Undecided
UMass Amherst/YouGov October 17–21, 2016 380 37% 41% 3% 10%
University of New Hampshire August 20–28, 2016 211 ± 6.7% 29% 48% 5% 19%
University of New Hampshire July 9–18, 2016 215 ± 6.7% 37% 43% 7% 10%

Results

New Hampshire's 1st congressional district, 2016 [10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carol Shea-Porter 162,080 44.3
Republican Frank Guinta (incumbent) 157,176 42.9
Independent Shawn O' Connor 34,735 9.5
Independent Brendan Kelly 6,074 1.7
Libertarian Robert Lombardo 5,507 1.5
n/a Write-ins 412 0.1
Total votes 365,984 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 2

The 2nd district covers the western and northern parts of the state and includes the cities of Nashua and Concord. The incumbent is Democrat Ann McLane Kuster, who has represented the district since 2013. She was re-elected with 55% of the vote in 2014, and the district has a PVI of D+3.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Potential
Declined

Results

Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann McLane Kuster (incumbent) 36,683 99.3
Republican Write-ins 249 0.7
Total votes 36,932 100

Republican primary

Candidates

Potential
Endorsements
Jim Lawrence

Results

Republican primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Lawrence 17,180 39.7
Republican Jack B. Flanagan 12,046 27.8
Republican Walter W. Kelly 4,287 9.9
Republican Andy Martin 3,145 7.3
Republican Eric Estevez 2,443 5.6
Republican Jay Mercer 2,113 4.9
Republican Casey Newell 1,839 4.3
Republican Write-ins 232 0.5
Total votes 43,285 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ann McLane
Kuster (D)
Jim
Lawrence (R)
Other Undecided
University of New Hampshire August 20–28, 2016 222 ± 6.6% 40% 34% 3% 22%
University of New Hampshire July 9–18, 2016 254 ± 6.1% 38% 32% 4% 26%

Results

New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district, 2016 [10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann McLane Kuster (incumbent) 174,495 49.7
Republican Jim Lawrence 158,973 45.3
Independent John Babiarz 17,088 4.9
n/a Write-ins 236 0.1
Total votes 350,792 100.0
Democratic hold

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q John DiStaso (November 14, 2014). "Analysis: NH Democrats already have deep bench for top races in 2016". New Hampshire Journal. Retrieved November 14, 2014.
  2. ^ DiStaso, John (February 10, 2015). "Democratic political newcomer O'Connor files candidacy for 1st District U.S. House seat". NH Journal. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  3. ^ DiStaso, John. "Shea-Porter announces she's running for US House again in 2016". WMUR.com. Manchester Hearst Properties Inc. Retrieved 20 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b Alexis Levinson (December 30, 2014). "10 Races to Watch in 2016: New Hampshire's 1st District". Roll Call. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d "2016 Primary Election Official Results". New Hampshire Secretary of State. September 13, 2016. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  6. ^ http://www.nhinsider.com/press-releases/2016/2/18/pam-tucker-announces-run-for-nh-01.html
  7. ^ DiStaso, John (March 25, 2016). "Innis suspends congressional campaign, says family, business interests come first". WMUR. Retrieved 25 March 2016.
  8. ^ "BRADLEY ENDORSES GATSAS; JOHN E. SUNUNU SUPPORTS ASHOOH". The Conway Daily Sun. September 6, 2016.
  9. ^ "Ashooh for Congress: Raising the bar in District 1". New Hampshire Union Leader. August 31, 2016.
  10. ^ a b "2016 General Election Information and Results". New Hampshire Secretary of State Elections Division. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  11. ^ Landrigan, Kevin (22 October 2015). "Landrigan: Top NH House Republican explores bid for 2nd District Congressman". Retrieved 23 October 2015.
  12. ^ "Lawrence for Congress: Best choice to challenge Kuster". New Hampshire Union Leader. August 31, 2016.

External links

This page was last edited on 25 April 2019, at 17:46
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