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2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Nebraska

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Nebraska

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

All three Nebraska seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 2 1
Seats won 3 0
Seat change Increase 1 Decrease 1
Popular vote 557,557 221,069
Percentage 70.74% 28.04%
Swing Increase7.10% Decrease6.55%

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Nebraska were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the three U.S. Representatives from the state of Nebraska, one from each of the state's three congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on May 10.

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Transcription

It's not a conspiracy, Brandon. It's the Electoral College. Let's go back to the beginning. The Founders of the United States had some serious shell shock after getting bullied by King George and his taxes. They believed in democracy, but not necessarily allowing the people to directly vote for President. When you say people, you of course mean, land owning white-men. The founders, like Alexander Hamilton were afraid voters could get swept up by a bunch of lies, false promises and a big personality and accidentally elect a tyrant. So The Founders wanted a safe guard. In the constitutional convention of 1787, a bunch of ideas were floated, including letting congress elect the president. The Southern states specifically wanted credit for having a larger population, even if those were mostly non-voters… aka, slaves. And because those spoiled white slave owners got whatever they wanted, the Convention settled on a system they made up. So here's literally how it works. On Election Day, November 5th, you get a ballot. Although that ballot may show the list of names you fought on facebook about all year, what you are really voting for in the fine print is an Elector. The number of Electors a state gets is equal to the amount of Congressmen they have. A total of 538 distributed roughly based on population (thanks slave owners), but weighted in favor of the smaller states. As a result, the smaller state you live in, the more your vote matters. So congratulations, if you live in Wyoming, your vote matters substantially more than in California. In each state, Whichever candidate gets a majority of the vote, gets ALL the electoral votes. So, there is literally no difference between a win of 99% or 51%. That person still wins the whole state aside from Maine and Nebraska. Obviously. This creates the situation called Swing States, where only a handful of states actually move the needle left or right - the vast majority of candidates' attention and resources go towards moving the large minority of people who haven’t made up their mind by November. From a state which has opinions like New York or Alabama? Too bad. Also, some bad news. It may be 2016, but not all American citizens can vote. If you live in the Territories, even though all 4.4 million of you outnumber Wyoming, Alaska, Vermont, The Dakotas, and Delaware COMBINED, you can’t vote. But some good news if you moved abroad to anywhere else in the world, you 6.3 million people can vote by mail - Or if you live in Space, you also can vote, just make sure you don’t accidentally land your ship in poor poor Puerto Rico. After election day, the winning electors, usually retired politicians and “friends of the party” hop on their horses and have until the Monday after the second Wednesday in December to get to their state capitols. There, they are asked to cast ballots for the candidate they were sent there for - but! As a buffer from the real people, electors can vote for whomever they want. Although this has never swayed an election, 87 times in American history one of these “friends” of the parties has gone rogue. Then, after celebrating the winter solstice, each state sends a messenger on horseback to Washington DC, where on January 6th at 1pm, a joint-session of Congress reads the elector’s ballots out loud. The Vice-President then formally announces the winner. In fact, three times in history, because the sitting-Vice-President was running for President, they had to announce their f loss, and then were bullied mercilessly. But thanks to America choosing a round number, In the very rare case of an Electoral college tie, the house of representative’s gets to vote on the president, and for the VP, they can pick whomever they. want. Each state gets one vote. So California and Delaware are equals. Basically in voting, it sucks to be California. Once all votes have been counted, the Electoral College disappears on the wind to join its family, Electoral Colleges of Novembers past. A new Electoral College will be reborn in 4 more years. With a few modifications, and much fewer horses, this system has remained unchanged since The Founders came up with it. Even though it was developed for 13 states, with only 6% of the population actually being eligible TO vote in the first place. Want to change it, well you would need 3/4 of congress to agree on it, and basically, the small states would never, ever go along. But Vote? No, yeah, definitely vote.

Contents

District 1

The 1st district encompassed most of the eastern quarter of the state and almost completely enveloped the 2nd district. It included the state capital, Lincoln, as well as the cities of Fremont, Columbus, Norfolk, Beatrice and South Sioux City. The incumbent was Republican Jeff Fortenberry, who had represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected with 69% of the vote in 2014. The district had a PVI of R+10.

Daniel Wik, a physician who specializes in pain management, was the Democratic nominee.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates
  • Daniel Wik, Physician

Results

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Wik 25,762 100.0
Total votes 25,762 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Fortenberry (incumbent) 62,704 100.0
Total votes 62,704 100.0

General election

Results

Nebraska's 1st congressional district, 2016 [3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Fortenberry (incumbent) 189,771 69.4
Democratic Daniel Wik 83,467 30.6
Total votes 273,238 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

The 2nd district was based in the Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area and included all of Douglas County and the urbanized areas of Sarpy County. The incumbent was Democrat Brad Ashford, who had represented the district since 2015. He was elected with 49% of the vote in 2014, defeating Republican incumbent Lee Terry. The district had a PVI of R+4.

Democratic primary

Scott Kleeb, a businessman who was the nominee for Nebraska's 3rd congressional district in 2006 and for the U.S. Senate in 2008, was speculated to challenge Ashford, a centrist Democrat, from the political left.[4]

Results

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Ashford (incumbent) 23,470 100.0
Total votes 23,470 100.0

Republican primary

Former state senator and Douglas County Commissioner Chip Maxwell, who considered running as an independent against Terry in 2012,[5] and retired United States Air Force Brigadier General Don Bacon ran in the Republican Party primary election.[6][7] Salesmen Dirk Arneson from Omaha was a candidate, but he dropped out on September 3, 2015, and endorsed Bacon.[citation needed]

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

Don Bacon

Results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Don Bacon 32,328 66.0
Republican Chip Maxwell 16,677 34.0
Total votes 49,005 100.0

Libertarian primary

Candidates

  • Jeffrey Lynn Stein[9]
  • Andy Shambaugh[9]

Results

Libertarian primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Steven Laird 108 46.2
Libertarian Andy Shambaugh 89 38.0
Libertarian Jeffrey Lynn Stein 37 15.8
Total votes 234 100.0

General election

The general election race was characterized as a tossup, with the incumbent Ashford being seen as having the edge.[10]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Brad
Ashford (D)
Don
Bacon (R)
Steven
Laird (L)
Undecided
Singularis Group (R-Bacon) October 26–27, 2016 1,482 ± 2.54% 45% 47% 4% 3%
North Star Opinion Research (R-CLF) October 22–24, 2016 400 ± 4.9% 44% 48%
Singularis Group (R-Bacon) May 11–12, 2016 1,007 ± 3.08% 42% 44% 5% 8%

Results

Nebraska's 2nd congressional district, 2016 [3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Don Bacon 141,066 48.9
Democratic Brad Ashford (incumbent) 137,602 47.7
Libertarian Steven Laird 9,640 3.4
Total votes 288,308 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

District 3

The 3rd district encompassed the western three-fourths of the state; it was one of the largest non-at-large Congressional districts in the country, covering nearly 65,000 square miles (170,000 km2), two time zones and 68.5 counties. It was mostly sparsely populated but included the cities of Grand Island, Kearney, Hastings, North Platte and Scottsbluff. The incumbent was Republican Adrian Smith, who had represented the district since 2007. He was re-elected with 75% of the vote in 2014. The district had a PVI of R+23.

Republican primary

Candidates

Results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Adrian Smith (incumbent) 78,154 100.0
Total votes 78,154 100.0

General election

Results

Nebraska's 3rd congressional district, 2016 [3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Adrian Smith (incumbent) 226,720 100.0
Total votes 226,720 100.0
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ Warneke, Kent (February 23, 2016). "Norfolk physician to challenge Fortenberry for seat in Congress". Norfolk Daily News. Retrieved February 28, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Official 2016 Primary Election Results" (PDF). Nebraska Secretary of State. Retrieved October 20, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "Official Report of the Board of State Canvassers" (PDF). Nebraska Secretary of State. Retrieved December 7, 2016.
  4. ^ Jordan, Joe (January 15, 2015). "Brad Ashford to get challenge from fellow Democrat? It's a 'possibility'". Nebraska Watchdog. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  5. ^ Jordan, Joe (November 5, 2014). "Move over 2014, 2016 Omaha House race is off and running". Nebraska Watchdog. Retrieved November 19, 2014.
  6. ^ Walton, Don (March 24, 2015). "Retired general bids for Ashford House seat". Lincoln Journal Star. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  7. ^ Tysver, Robynn (March 25, 2015). "Citing military and foreign policy as priorities, retired Brig. Gen. Don Bacon announces bid for Congress". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i "ENDORSEMENTS".
  9. ^ a b "Statewide Candidate List" (PDF). Nebraska Secretary of State. Retrieved February 28, 2016.
  10. ^ Loizzo, Mike (September 26, 2016). "Nebraska's 2nd Congressional District Race Remains a Toss-Up". Nebraska Radio Network. Retrieved December 25, 2016.

External links

This page was last edited on 15 June 2019, at 02:41
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