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2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

Alabama's seven seats in the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 6 1
Seats won 6 1
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,222,018 621,911
Percentage 64.67% 32.91%
Swing Decrease0.51% Increase2.22%

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the seven U.S. Representatives from the state of Alabama, one from each of the state's seven congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on March 1.

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  • ✪ The Electoral College Explained | History & Voting Process in American Politics
  • ✪ The American Presidential Election of 1852

Transcription

It's not a conspiracy, Brandon. It's the Electoral College. Let's go back to the beginning. The Founders of the United States had some serious shell shock after getting bullied by King George and his taxes. They believed in democracy, but not necessarily allowing the people to directly vote for President. When you say people, you of course mean, land owning white-men. The founders, like Alexander Hamilton were afraid voters could get swept up by a bunch of lies, false promises and a big personality and accidentally elect a tyrant. So The Founders wanted a safe guard. In the constitutional convention of 1787, a bunch of ideas were floated, including letting congress elect the president. The Southern states specifically wanted credit for having a larger population, even if those were mostly non-voters… aka, slaves. And because those spoiled white slave owners got whatever they wanted, the Convention settled on a system they made up. So here's literally how it works. On Election Day, November 5th, you get a ballot. Although that ballot may show the list of names you fought on facebook about all year, what you are really voting for in the fine print is an Elector. The number of Electors a state gets is equal to the amount of Congressmen they have. A total of 538 distributed roughly based on population (thanks slave owners), but weighted in favor of the smaller states. As a result, the smaller state you live in, the more your vote matters. So congratulations, if you live in Wyoming, your vote matters substantially more than in California. In each state, Whichever candidate gets a majority of the vote, gets ALL the electoral votes. So, there is literally no difference between a win of 99% or 51%. That person still wins the whole state aside from Maine and Nebraska. Obviously. This creates the situation called Swing States, where only a handful of states actually move the needle left or right - the vast majority of candidates' attention and resources go towards moving the large minority of people who haven’t made up their mind by November. From a state which has opinions like New York or Alabama? Too bad. Also, some bad news. It may be 2016, but not all American citizens can vote. If you live in the Territories, even though all 4.4 million of you outnumber Wyoming, Alaska, Vermont, The Dakotas, and Delaware COMBINED, you can’t vote. But some good news if you moved abroad to anywhere else in the world, you 6.3 million people can vote by mail - Or if you live in Space, you also can vote, just make sure you don’t accidentally land your ship in poor poor Puerto Rico. After election day, the winning electors, usually retired politicians and “friends of the party” hop on their horses and have until the Monday after the second Wednesday in December to get to their state capitols. There, they are asked to cast ballots for the candidate they were sent there for - but! As a buffer from the real people, electors can vote for whomever they want. Although this has never swayed an election, 87 times in American history one of these “friends” of the parties has gone rogue. Then, after celebrating the winter solstice, each state sends a messenger on horseback to Washington DC, where on January 6th at 1pm, a joint-session of Congress reads the elector’s ballots out loud. The Vice-President then formally announces the winner. In fact, three times in history, because the sitting-Vice-President was running for President, they had to announce their f loss, and then were bullied mercilessly. But thanks to America choosing a round number, In the very rare case of an Electoral college tie, the house of representative’s gets to vote on the president, and for the VP, they can pick whomever they. want. Each state gets one vote. So California and Delaware are equals. Basically in voting, it sucks to be California. Once all votes have been counted, the Electoral College disappears on the wind to join its family, Electoral Colleges of Novembers past. A new Electoral College will be reborn in 4 more years. With a few modifications, and much fewer horses, this system has remained unchanged since The Founders came up with it. Even though it was developed for 13 states, with only 6% of the population actually being eligible TO vote in the first place. Want to change it, well you would need 3/4 of congress to agree on it, and basically, the small states would never, ever go along. But Vote? No, yeah, definitely vote.

Contents

Summary

Congressional district Incumbent This race
District PVI Representative Party First
elected
Results Candidates
Alabama 1 R+15 Bradley Byrne Republican 2013 Incumbent re-elected. Bradley Byrne (Republican) 96.4%[1]
Write-ins 3.6%
Alabama 2 R+17 Martha Roby Republican 2010 Incumbent re-elected. Martha Roby (Republican) 48.8%[2]
Nathan Mathis (Democratic) 40.5%[3]
Write-ins 10.7%
Alabama 3 R+16 Mike Rogers Republican 2002 Incumbent re-elected. Mike Rogers (Republican) 66.9%[4]
Jesse Smith (Democratic) 32.9%[5]
Alabama 4 R+28 Robert Aderholt Republican 1996 Incumbent re-elected. Robert Aderholt (Republican) 98.5%[6]
Write-ins 1.5%
Alabama 5 R+17 Mo Brooks Republican 2010 Incumbent re-elected. Mo Brooks (Republican) 66.7%[7]
Will Boyd (Democratic) 33.2%[8]
Alabama 6 R+28 Gary Palmer Republican 2014 Incumbent re-elected. Gary Palmer (Republican) 74.5%[1]
David Putman (Democratic) 25.4%[9]
Alabama 7 D+20 Terri Sewell Democratic 2010 Incumbent re-elected. Terri Sewell (Democratic) 98.4%[1]
Write-ins 1.6%

District 1

The incumbent is Republican Bradley Byrne, who has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 68% of the vote in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+15.

Republican Party

  • Bradley Byrne, incumbent U.S. Representative
  • Dean Young, businessman and candidate for this seat in 2013

Primary results

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bradley Byrne (incumbent) 71,310 60.1
Republican Dean Young 47,319 39.9
Total votes 118,629 100.0

General election

Results

Alabama's 1st congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bradley Byrne (incumbent) 208,083 96.4
n/a Write-ins 7,810 3.6
Total votes 215,893 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

The incumbent is Republican Martha Roby, who has represented the district since 2011. She was re-elected with 67% of the vote in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+17.

Rob John had filed paperwork with the FEC to run as an Independent.[12] After Gerritson declared her candidacy John announced that he was suspending his campaign and endorsing her.[13]

Republican Party

  • Becky Gerritson, tea party activist[14]
  • Martha Roby, incumbent U.S. Representative
  • Robert L. "Bob" Rogers

Primary results

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha Roby (incumbent) 78,689 66.4
Republican Becky Gerritson 33,015 27.8
Republican Robert L. "Bob" Rogers 6,856 5.8
Total votes 118,560 100.0

Democratic Party

General election

Results

Alabama's 2nd congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha Roby (incumbent) 134,886 48.8
Democratic Nathan Mathis 112,089 40.5
n/a Write-ins 29,609 10.7
Total votes 276,584 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The incumbent is Republican Mike Rogers, who has represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected with 66% of the vote in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+16.

Republican Party

Primary results

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Rogers (incumbent) 77,432 76.0
Republican Larry DiChiara 24,474 24.0
Total votes 101,906 100.0

Democratic Party

  • Jesse Smith, candidate for this seat in 2014

General election

Results

Alabama's 3rd congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Rogers (incumbent) 192,164 66.9
Democratic Jesse Smith 94,549 32.9
n/a Write-ins 391 0.2
Total votes 287,104 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The incumbent is Republican Robert Aderholt, who has represented the district since 1997. He was re-elected unopposed in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+28.

Republican Party

Primary results

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 86,660 81.2
Republican Phil Norris 20,096 18.8
Total votes 106,756 100.0

General election

Results

Alabama's 4th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 235,925 98.5
n/a Write-ins 3,519 1.5
Total votes 239,444 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

The incumbent is Republican Mo Brooks, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected with 74% of the vote in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+17.

Republican Party

Democratic Party

General election

Results

Alabama's 5th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mo Brooks (incumbent) 205,647 66.7
Democratic Will Boyd, Jr. 102,234 33.2
n/a Write-ins 445 0.1
Total votes 308,326 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The incumbent is Republican Gary Palmer, who has represented the district since 2015. He was elected with 76% of the vote in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+28

Republican Party

Democratic Party

General election

Results

Alabama's 6th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gary Palmer (incumbent) 245,313 74.5
Democratic David J. Putman 83,709 25.4
n/a Write-ins 284 0.1
Total votes 329,306 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The incumbent is Democrat Terri Sewell, who has represented the district since 2011. She was re-elected without opposition in the general election in 2014. The district has a PVI of D+20.

Democratic Party

Republican Party

David Van Williams originally qualified to run for this district as a Republican, but was removed from the ballot.[18]

General election

Results

Alabama's 7th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Terri Sewell (incumbent) 229,330 98.4
n/a Write-ins 3,698 1.6
Total votes 233,028 100.0
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ a b c "Alabama primary 2016: Who qualified for the ballot?". Birmingham News. November 6, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  2. ^ "36 mayors endorse Martha Roby for re-election to Congress". WSFA 12. October 28, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  3. ^ "Sen. Richard Shelby will face Republican challengers". Montgomery Advertiser. November 7, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  4. ^ a b Rice, Mark (October 15, 2015). "Ex-local superintendent running for Congress". Ledger-Enquirer. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  5. ^ Koplowitz, Howard (November 6, 2015). "Alabama primary 2016: Who qualified for the ballot?". AL.com. Retrieved November 16, 2015.
  6. ^ "Local, state election choices set with end of candidate qualifying". Decatur Daily. November 7, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  7. ^ "Friday deadline to file candidacy forms for 2016 election". WAFF. November 7, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  8. ^ Little, Jim (July 16, 2015). "Florence pastor announces candidacy for Congress". The Huntsville Times. Retrieved July 22, 2015.
  9. ^ Koplowitz, Howard (November 10, 2015). "Democrat David Putman challenging Gary Palmer for Congress". AL.com. Retrieved November 24, 2015.
  10. ^ a b c d "2016 Primary Election Official Results, March 1, 2016". Alabama Secretary of State. Retrieved May 13, 2016.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g "General Election Results November 8, 2016" (PDF). Alabama Secretary of State. Retrieved Dec 14, 2016.
  12. ^ "FEC Form 2 Statement of Candidacy - Robert E. John, Jr" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. July 24, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  13. ^ John, Rob (October 1, 2015). "So proud of Becky and her family for this decision..." Facebook. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  14. ^ Cason, Mike (October 1, 2015). "Wetumpka Tea Party founder Becky Gerritson challenges Martha Roby for Congress". al.com. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  15. ^ Koplowitz, Howard (July 27, 2015). "Aderholt opponent Phil Norris doesn't live in district, but he doesn't have to". al.com. Retrieved August 21, 2015.
  16. ^ Little, Jim (July 16, 2015). "Florence pastor announces candidacy for Congress". The Huntsville Times. Retrieved July 22, 2015.
  17. ^ Koplowitz, Howard (November 10, 2015). "Democrat David Putman challenging Gary Palmer for Congress". AL.com. Retrieved November 24, 2015.
  18. ^ "Amended Certification of Republican Party Candidates (amended 12/2/2015)" (PDF). Alabama Votes. December 2, 2015. Retrieved February 9, 2016.

External links

This page was last edited on 16 November 2019, at 22:31
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