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2014 South Carolina elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A general election was held in the U.S. state of South Carolina on November 4, 2014. All of South Carolina's executive officers were up for election as well as both United States Senate seats, and all of South Carolina's seven seats in the United States House of Representatives.

Primary elections were held on June 10, 2014 and primary runoffs were held on June 24.

Governor

Incumbent Republican Governor Nikki Haley ran for re-election to a second term.[1]

Democratic State Senator Vincent Sheheen, the nominee in 2010 ran again.[2]

Republican-turned-Independent Tom Ervin, an attorney, former State Representative and former circuit court judge ran, but withdrew in the final week and endorsed Sheheen.[3] Other candidates included Libertarian businessman Steve French;[4] and former NFL player Morgan Bruce Reeves of the United Citizens Party.[5]

Haley won re-election.

Lieutenant Governor

This was the last election in which the lieutenant governor was elected separately from the Governor. Republican Ken Ard, who was elected in 2010, resigned the office in March 2012 while under investigation for ethics charges. He was succeeded by a fellow Republican, President pro tempore of the South Carolina Senate Glenn F. McConnell. McConnell had planned to run, but withdrew from the race in January 2014[6] and was announced as the next President of the College of Charleston in March, a position he took up in June.[7]

The state constitution requires that the Senate President pro tempore become Lieutenant Governor in the event of a vacancy but McConnell's successor as President pro tempore, Republican State Senator John E. Courson, expressed no desire to give up his Senate seat to serve as Lieutenant Governor for six months. He went as far as resigning as President pro tempore, to avoid becoming Lieutenant Governor, a position widely regarded as one of the weakest in the state. There was much confusion as to what would happen next, with McConnell saying he would delay his resignation so as not to leave the state "in a constitutional crisis" and Courson and Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Larry A. Martin saying that they knew of no Senator who would want to become Lieutenant Governor for six months.[8] The dispute was finally ended when Democrat Yancey McGill agreed to become Senate President pro tempore, and then Lieutenant Governor. After he ascended to that office, Republican Hugh K. Leatherman, Sr. became the new Senate President pro tempore.[9]

Businessman Mike Campbell, who lost the runoff for Lieutenant Governor in 2010, businessman Pat McKinney, former Attorney General of South Carolina and candidate for Governor in 2010 Henry McMaster and minister Ray Moore ran for the Republican nomination.[10]

South Carolina Lieutenant Governor Republican Primary Results, 2014[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Henry McMaster 131,546 43.63
Republican Pat McKinney 73,451 24.36
Republican Mike Campbell 72,204 23.95
Republican Ray Moore 24,335 8.07
Total votes 301,536 100

As no candidate won a majority of the vote, a runoff was held. A recount had been scheduled to take place as the difference between second-placed Pat McKinney and third-placed Mike Campbell was only 0.41%, but McKinney withdrew from the race, citing personal reasons.[12] Campbell thus faced first-placed Henry McMaster in the runoff.

South Carolina Lieutenant Governor Republican Primary Runoff results, 2014[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Henry McMaster 85,301 63.58
Republican Mike Campbell 48,863 36.42
Total votes 134,164 100

State Representative Bakari Sellers ran for the Democrats.[14] McMaster won the general election.

South Carolina Lieutenant Governor election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Henry McMaster 726,821 58.75% +3.59%
Democratic Bakari Sellers 508,807 41.13% -3.64%
Write-ins 1,514 0.12% +0.04%
Majority 218,014 17.62% +7.53%
Turnout 1,237,142 42.94% -7.54%
Republican gain from Democratic Swing

Attorney General

Incumbent Republican Attorney General Alan Wilson ran for re-election to a second term in office.

Attorney, President of the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina and candidate for South Carolina's 7th congressional district in 2012 Parnell Diggs ran as the Democratic nominee. Wilson defeated him and won re-election.

South Carolina Attorney General election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Alan Wilson 738,434 60.26% +6.52%
Democratic Parnell Diggs 486,058 39.67% -4.53%
Write-ins 879 0.07% +0.03%
Majority 252,376 17.62% +8.10%
Turnout 1,225,371 42.53% -7.95%
Republican hold Swing

Secretary of State

Map showing the results of the 2014 South Carolina Secretary of State general election by county.
Map showing the results of the 2014 South Carolina Secretary of State general election by county.

Incumbent Republican Secretary of State Mark Hammond is running for re-election to a fourth term in office.

Nonprofit consultant Ginny Deerin ran as the Democratic nominee. She was endorsed by the Club for Growth, a conservative political organization that usually supports Republicans. She was the first ever Democrat running for statewide office to have been endorsed by them.[16] However, Hammond still won re-election.

South Carolina Secretary of State election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Mark Hammond 730,739 59.51% -1.40%
Democratic Ginny Deerin 496,344 40.42% +1.38%
Write-ins 788 0.06% -0.01%
Majority 234,395 19.09% -2.78%
Turnout 1,227,871 42.62% -7.48%
Republican hold Swing

Treasurer

Incumbent Republican Treasurer Curtis M. Loftis, Jr. is running for re-election to a second term in office.[17]

Brian Adams ran against Loftis, Jr. in the Republican primary.

South Carolina Treasurer Republican Primary results, 2014[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Curtis M. Loftis, Jr. 177,854 62.02
Republican Brian Adams 108,934 37.98
Total votes 286,788 100

No Democrat filed to run for the office. Loftis won re-election.

South Carolina Treasurer election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Curtis Loftis 857,526 98.75% -0.19%
Write-ins 10,819 1.25% +0.19%
Majority 846,707 97.50% -0.38%
Turnout 868,345 30.14% -4.61%
Republican hold Swing

Comptroller General

Incumbent Republican Richard Eckstrom is running for re-election to a fourth term in office.

He was being challenged in the Republican primary by Robert D. Shelley, but Shelley withdrew.

Kyle Herbert is running for the Democrats. Eckstrom won re-election.

South Carolina Comptroller General election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Richard Eckstrom 728,549 59.80% +3.30%
Democratic Kyle Herbert 489,066 40.14% -3.31%
Write-ins 693 0.06% +0.01%
Majority 239,483 19.66% +6.61%
Turnout 1,218,308 42.49% -7.78%
Republican hold Swing

Superintendent of Education

Incumbent Republican Superintendent of Education Mick Zais did not run for re-election to a second term in office.[18]

Lee Atwater's widow Sally Atwater, Anderson County School Board member Gary Burgess, South Carolina Department of Education official Meka Bosket Childs, Amy Cofield, candidate for the State House in 2010 Sheri Few, Don Jordan, Charleston County School Board member and candidate for South Carolina's 1st congressional district in 2013 Elizabeth Moffly and former State Representative Molly Mitchell Spearman ran for the Republican nomination.

South Carolina Superintendent of Education Republican Primary results, 2014[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Molly Mitchell Spearman 64,992 22.45
Republican Sally Atwater 63,584 21.96
Republican Sheri Few 56,044 19.36
Republican Gary Burgess 31,091 10.74
Republican Amy Cofield 20,720 7.16
Republican Meka Bosket Childs 20,720 6.71
Republican Elizabeth Moffly 17,421 6.02
Republican Don Jordan 16,246 5.61
Total votes 289,534 100

As no candidate won a majority, a runoff was held between the top two finishers, Molly Mitchell Spearman and Sally Atwater. Awtwater was considered to be the frontrunner,[19] until she called conservative talk show host Russ Cassell on News Radio WORD to talk about her candidacy. In the "awkward", "evasive" and "awful, incomprehensible, it-should-force-her-to-drop-out-of-the-race" interview, she seemed unable to give answers to basic questions about sex education and the teaching of evolution, to Cassell's amazement. After Awtater hung up, Cassell concluded: "Folks, I don't want to be brutal, I don't want to be mean. What you have just heard is an example of a person running for public office on name recognition only, who is clueless." Atwater subsequently apologised for her performance and the interview, which was uploaded to YouTube, went viral.[20][21][22][23][24] Atwater subsequently declined to debate Spearman before the runoff, with a spokesman for Spearman saying that "given [Atwater's] debate performance in the primary and her recent radio interview on WORD-FM, we can understand why she has made this political calculation.[25] Atwater was also the subject of a lawsuit alleging that as a teacher she "routinely harassed, physically assaulted, and psychologically tormented" a disabled student.[26] Atwater's campaign dismissed the lawsuit as "baseless and frivolous".[27]

South Carolina Superintendent of Education Republican Primary Runoff results, 2014[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Molly Mitchell Spearman 76,672 57.16
Republican Sally Atwater 57,456 42.84
Total votes 134,164 100

Endorsements

Sally Atwater
Presidents of the United States
U.S. Representatives

South Carolina Department of Education official Montrio M. Belton, Sr., Sheila C. Gallagher, State Representative Jerry Govan and Tom Thompson ran for the Democratic nomination.

South Carolina Superintendent of Education Democratic Primary results, 2014[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila C. Gallagher 42,186 36.44
Democratic Tom Thompson 30,488 26.34
Democratic Jerry Govan 21,824 18.85
Democratic Montrio M. Belton, Sr. 21,260 18.37
Total votes 115,758 100

As no candidate won a majority, a runoff was held between the top two finishers, Sheila C. Gallagher and Tom Thompson.

South Carolina Superintendent of Education Democratic Primary Runoff results, 2014[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Thompson 23,541 59.13
Democratic Sheila C. Gallagher 16,269 40.87
Total votes 39,810 100

Ed Murray ran as the American Party nominee. Spearman won the general election.

South Carolina Superintendent of Education election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Molly Spearman 699,081 56.97% +5.71%
Democratic Tom Thompson 476,358 38.82% -4.29%
American Party Ed Murray 46,695 3.81% +3.81%
Write-ins 5,055 0.41% +0.37%
Majority 222,723 18.15% +10.00%
Turnout 1,227,189 42.60% -7.71%
Republican hold Swing

Commissioner of Agriculture

Incumbent Republican Commissioner of Agriculture Hugh Weathers, who was appointed to the position in September 2004, ran for re-election to a third full term in office.

Joe Farmer ran against Weathers in the Republican primary.

South Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture Republican Primary results, 2014[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Hugh Weathers 184,621 65.06
Republican Joe Farmer 99,155 34.94
Total votes 283,776 100

Emile DeFelice of the American Party and David Edmond of the United Citizens Party also ran. No Democrat filed to run for the office. Weathers won re-election.

South Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Hugh Weathers 759,640 79.66% +19.55%
United Citizens Dave Edmond 106,223 11.14% +11.14%
American Party Emile DeFelice 84,831 8.90% +8.90%
Write-ins 2,922 0.31% +0.27%
Majority 653,417 68.52% +48.46%
Turnout 953,616 33.10% -16.82%
Republican hold Swing

Adjutant General

Incumbent Republican Adjutant General Robert E. Livingston, Jr. ran for re-election to a second term in office.

James Breazeale ran against Livingston, Jr. in the Republican primary.

South Carolina Adjutant General Republican primary, 2014[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Livingston, Jr. 209,484 75.75
Republican James Breazeale 67,077 24.25
Total votes 276,561 100

No Democrat filed to run for the office. Livigston won re-election. Because South Carolina voters approved Amendment 2 in the 2014 general election, this will be the last time that the adjutant general is popularly elected. Because South Carolina is the only state in the union to elect its adjutant general, this is the final time that a state adjutant general will stand for election in the United States, barring future state constitutional changes.

South Carolina Adjutant General election, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Bob Livingston 858,106 98.97% -0.28%
Write-ins 8,896 1.03% +0.28%
Majority 849,210 97.94% -0.56%
Turnout 867,002 30.10% -4.27%
Republican hold Swing

United States Senate

Regularly-scheduled election

Incumbent Republican Senator Lindsey Graham is running for re-election to a third term in office.[30] He faced six challengers in the Republican primary: pastor and businessman Det Bowers,[31] State Senator Lee Bright,[32] businessman and candidate for South Carolina's 3rd congressional district in 2010 Richard Cash,[33] attorney, Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Army Reserve and candidate for lieutenant governor in 2010 Bill Connor,[34] attorney Benjamin Dunn[35] and businesswoman and author Nancy Mace.[32] Graham won the primary with 56% of the vote, negating the need for a runoff.

State Senator Brad Hutto defeated entrepreneur Jay Stamper in the Democratic primary.[36]

Former Republican State Treasurer Thomas Ravenel is running as an Independent.[37] Libertarian Victor Kocher[10][38] is also running.

Special election

Incumbent Republican Senator Tim Scott, who was appointed to the office in January 2013 after Jim DeMint resigned, is running for election to the remaining part of the term. The seat will be up for election to a six-year term in 2016.

Scott defeated Randall Young in the Republican primary.[10]

Richland County Councilwoman Joyce Dickerson[39] defeated former York County Councilman Sidney Moore[40] and attorney and candidate for South Carolina's 7th congressional district in 2012 Harry Pavilack[41] for the Democratic nomination.

Independents Brandon Armstrong, a painting contractor,[42] and Jill Bossi, former Vice President of the American Red Cross,[43] are also running.

United States House of Representatives

All of South Carolina's seven seats in the United States House of Representatives will be up for election in 2014.

Advisory Questions and Referendums

Several advisory questions were placed on the primary election ballots to advise the major state parties on the positions of their membership on major policy questions. In the general election, voters also voted on two constitutional amendments. All passed with heavy majorities.

Primary Advisory Questions

Democratic Advisory Question One asked primary voters whether each state, rather than Congress, should determine whether to allow and how to regulate online gaming.

Democratic Question 1
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
89,365 72.36
No 34,131 27.64
Total votes 123,496 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,836,470 4.35
Source: – Official Results

Democratic Advisory Question Two asked whether gaming laws should be "modified" to fund transportation needs in the state, rather than tax increases.

Democratic Question 2
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
99,667 80.50
No 24,143 19.50
Total votes 123,810 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,836,470 4.36
Source: – Official Results

Democratic Advisory Question Three asked whether medical marijuana should be legalized for the treatment of "severe, chronic illnesses."

Democratic Question 3
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
94,961 75.29
No 31,172 24.71
Total votes 126,133 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,836,470 4.45
Source: – Official Results

Republican Question 1 asked whether the "privileges and immunities" of South Carolina citizens under the state constitution should be extended to unborn fetuses.

Republican Question 1
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
240,453 78.65
No 65,273 21.35
Total votes 305,726 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,836,470 10.78
Source: – Official Results

Republican Question 2 asked whether the state income tax should be reduced by 1.4% a year until it no longer exists.

Republican Question 2
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
245,441 79.86
No 61,908 20.14
Total votes 307,349 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,836,470 10.84
Source: – Official Results

Constitutional Amendments

In the general election, voters voted on two amendments.

Amendment One amended the state's constitution to allow non-profit organizations to hold raffles for fundraising purposes. It passed.

Amendment 1
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
989,991 82.72
No 206,862 17.28
Total votes 1,196,853 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,881,052 41.54
Source: – Official Results

Amendment Two amended the state's constitution to make the Adjutant General appointed by the Governor, rather than popularly elected. It passed.

Amendment 2
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
666,963 56.38
No 515,970 43.62
Total votes 1,182,933 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,881,052 41.06
Source: – Official Results

References

  1. ^ Kopan, Tal (August 12, 2013). "Aide: Nikki Haley running for reelection". Politico. Retrieved August 12, 2013.
  2. ^ Shain, Andrew (April 10, 2013). "Sheheen announces another run for governor". Herald Online. Archived from the original on April 7, 2014. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
  3. ^ "Nikki Haley Draws a Primary Opponent". FITSNews. March 29, 2014. Retrieved March 29, 2014.
  4. ^ Shain, Andrew (March 15, 2014). "Libertarian joins SC governor's race". Our State. Retrieved March 16, 2014.
  5. ^ "SC politics: GOP governors take another shot at Democrat Sheheen". Our State. March 31, 2014. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-04-07. Retrieved 2014-04-01.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "McConnell named College of Charleston president".
  8. ^ "Courson resigns SC Senate leadership post in spat with Lt. Gov. McConnell (update)". Archived from the original on 2014-07-27. Retrieved 2014-07-26.
  9. ^ Press, SEANNA ADCOX, Associated. "Democrat McGill is S.C.'s new lieutenant governor".
  10. ^ a b c Shain, Andrew (March 28, 2014). "ELECTION 2014 (updated): Who's filed for statewide, State House, Congressional offices". Our State. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved March 28, 2014.
  11. ^ a b c d e f "Official results 2014 Statewide Primary Election June 10, 2014". South Carolina State Election Commission. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  12. ^ Schuyler Kropf (June 12, 2014). "Pat McKinney dropping out of Lt. Gov. race; Henry McMaster faces Mike Campbell in runoff". The Post and Courier. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  13. ^ a b c "Official results 2014 2014 Republican and Democratic Primary Runoff". South Carolina State Election Commission. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  14. ^ "McGill move could help SC Democrats, party chairman says".
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h "South Carolina Election Results". South Carolina Board of Elections. November 13, 2014. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  16. ^ "Deerin first Democrat endorsed by conservative group for state race". Bluffton Today. September 21, 2014. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  17. ^ "Loftis to seek second term as State Treasurer". Associated Press. Archived from the original on March 13, 2014. Retrieved March 12, 2014.
  18. ^ "ELECTION 2014: Mick Zais won't seek re-election for SC education superintendent".
  19. ^ "Interview of the Day". Political Wire. June 16, 2014. Archived from the original on June 18, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014.
  20. ^ Sally Atwater's terrifying interview on WORD Radio on YouTube
  21. ^ "Want to hear a really awkward interview with a politician?". The Washington Post. June 16, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014.
  22. ^ "Sally Atwater (R), Running for Superintendent of Education in SC, Can't Answer Basic Education-Related Questions". Patheos. June 16, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014.
  23. ^ "Sally Atwater responds to stories about radio interview (has audio)". The Post and Courier. June 17, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014.
  24. ^ "Sally Atwater clarifies her stances on sex ed, evolution". Charleston City Paper. June 19, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014.
  25. ^ "Sally Atwater declines ETV debate before superintendent of education runoff". The State. June 16, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014.
  26. ^ "Lawsuit Alleges Sally Atwater Shoved a Special Needs Child". Mediaite. June 21, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  27. ^ McCabe, David (June 23, 2014). "Republican Sally Atwater Faces Lawsuit Alleging She Shoved Student Who Wanted Candy". Huffington Post. The Huffington Post. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  28. ^ http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/201782-george-hw-bush-endorses-widow-of-lee-atwater}[permanent dead link]
  29. ^ Atwater for Education (5 May 2014). "Former Speaker Newt Gingrich endorses Sally Atwater for SC Superintendent of Education" – via YouTube.
  30. ^ Rosen, James. "WASHINGTON: Graham: 'I expect' a primary challenge | News". Our State. Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Retrieved February 14, 2014.
  31. ^ Hamby, Peter (February 4, 2014). "Pastor joins crowded GOP race to unseat Lindsey Graham". CNN. Retrieved February 4, 2014.
  32. ^ a b Shain, Andrew (August 1, 2013). "First Citadel female grad, Sen. Bright will take on Graham". Our State. Archived from the original on August 4, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2013.
  33. ^ "Republican Cash to run against Graham in 2014". The Greenville News. Associated Press. April 16, 2013. Archived from the original on April 19, 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  34. ^ Self, Jamie (November 8, 2013). "SC Senate race: Bill Connor becomes Lindsey Graham's 4th GOP opponent". Our State. Retrieved November 10, 2013.
  35. ^ Self, Jamie (March 13, 2014). "Despite 'ambiguously gay' barb, four Graham foes unite". Our State. Retrieved March 18, 2014.
  36. ^ . WTLX. June 10, 2014 https://archive.today/20150212135102/http://www.wltx.com/story/news/local/2014/06/10/brad-hutto-wins-democratic-primary/10306321/. Archived from the original on February 12, 2015. Retrieved February 12, 2015. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  37. ^ Schuyler Kropf (April 8, 2014). "Southern Charm recap: Thomas Ravenel and the U.S. Senate?". The State. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  38. ^ "Hutto seeking U.S. Senate seat". Fort Mill Times. March 29, 2014. Retrieved April 1, 2014.
  39. ^ Renee Standera (October 3, 2013). "County council member to run for U.S. Senate seat". wistv. Archived from the original on November 2, 2013. Retrieved October 30, 2013.
  40. ^ Zou, Jie Jenny (March 27, 2014). "Former York County Council member to run for Scott's U.S. Senate seat". The Herald. Retrieved March 27, 2014.
  41. ^ Jamie Self (September 14, 2013). "Exclusive: Another unknown Democrat seeks US Senate seat in SC". Our State. Archived from the original on November 1, 2013.
  42. ^ Sel, Jamie (November 27, 2013). "ELECTION 2014: Independent collecting signatures to run against Tim Scott". Our State. Retrieved February 5, 2014.
  43. ^ "Tega Cay exec running for U.S. Senate". Fort Mill Times. March 24, 2014. Retrieved March 26, 2014.

External links

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