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2013 Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2013 Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election

← 2009 November 5, 2013 (2013-11-05) 2017 →
 
Watts BBQ 2013 (8993613772) (cropped).jpg
Bishopewjacksonsr takenatrally (cropped 2).jpg
Nominee Ralph Northam E. W. Jackson
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,213,155 980,257
Percentage 55.1% 44.5%

Virginia Lieutenant Gubernatorial election 2013.svg
County and independent city results
Northam:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Jackson:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

Lieutenant-Governor before election

Bill Bolling
Republican

Elected Lieutenant-Governor

Ralph Northam
Democratic

The Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election of 2013 took place on November 5, 2013, to elect the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. The incumbent Lieutenant Governor, Republican Bill Bolling, had originally planned to run for Governor of Virginia in the 2013 gubernatorial election, but withdrew upon the entry of Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli.

On May 18, 2013, a Republican state convention in Richmond nominated minister and conservative activist E.W. Jackson over six others after four ballots. The Democratic primary on June 11, 2013 was won by State Senator Ralph Northam, who defeated Aneesh Chopra, former Chief Technology Officer of the United States.[1] Northam then defeated Jackson by a wide margin in the general election.[2]

As the Senate of Virginia was evenly split between 20 Democrats and 20 Republicans, the lieutenant gubernatorial election effectively decided which party had control of that chamber.

Background

In early 2008, Bolling and then-Attorney General Bob McDonnell struck a deal in which Bolling agreed to run for re-election as lieutenant governor to allow McDonnell to run unopposed for governor in 2009, in exchange for McDonnell's support for Bolling for governor in 2013.[3] The deal was widely known and as such, Bolling was effectively running for governor since 2009,[4] and in April 2010, Bolling filed the necessary paperwork to run in 2013.[5] Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, elected alongside McDonnell and Bolling in 2009, stated that he intended to run for re-election as attorney general in 2013, but did not rule out running for governor.[6] In December 2011, Cuccinelli announced to his staff that he would run against Bolling for governor in 2013; the news went public, and in response, Bolling issued a statement accusing Cuccinelli of putting "his own personal ambition ahead of the best interests of the commonwealth and the Republican Party."[7] Cuccinelli's announcement came two days before the annual statewide conference of Virginia Republicans, at which Bolling and his staff expressed being upset with Cuccinelli's decision.[8]

Bolling, who was polling poorly against Cuccinelli, withdrew from the race on November 28, 2012. He cited the Republican Party's decision to move to a nominating convention rather than hold a primary. He ruled out running for another term as lieutenant governor and refused to endorse Cuccinelli.[9]

Republican nomination

The Republican Party chose its nominee at a convention in Richmond. Seven candidates were running, and after four rounds of balloting, E.W. Jackson was chosen as the nominee.

Candidates

Nominated at convention

Defeated at convention

Declined

Democratic primary

The Virginia Democratic primary was held on June 11, 2013.[15] Ralph Northam was chosen as the nominee.

Candidates

Declared

Declined

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Aneesh
Chopra
Ralph
Northam
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling May 24–26, 2013 322 ± 5.5% 27% 18% 54%

Results

Virginia Lieutenant Governor Democratic primary, 2013[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ralph Northam 78,337 54.24%
Democratic Aneesh Chopra 66,098 45.76%
Majority 12,239 8.47%
Turnout 144,435

General election

September debate

The two candidates met in a debate held in Arlington on September 24, 2013. The debate was marked by sharp contrasts between the candidates on both issues and style. Northam was the aggressor in the debate, attacking Jackson over his controversial statements and personal history.[20]

In response to repeated attacks from Northam on Jackson's history of controversial statements, Jackson read aloud a section of the Virginia Constitution that differentiates social opinions from one's ability to govern.[21] Jackson said, "I know the difference between what I do [in church] and what I’m required to do here. ... If I’m elected, I’m going to serve all the people of Virginia regardless of what their religious background is. ... I’m not running to be preacher, theologian, bishop, pastor of Virginia. I’m running to be lieutenant governor of Virginia."[22][23]

Northam spoke at length on abortion, saying regulations and laws on abortion recently passed by the General Assembly represented "an assault on women's reproductive health care," and attacked Jackson for his support of those regulations and laws.[20] Jackson responded simply, "I am unabashedly pro-life. I make no apologies for that."[20]

Jackson said he opposed a Medicaid expansion in Virginia, saying it would saddle Virginia with debt.[20] Northam said he supported the expansion because if Virginia rejected it, the taxes it pays to the federal government would go to other states.[20]

Both candidates sought to speak more personally about themselves. Northam talked about his career in the military and medicine, while Jackson talked about getting through a rough childhood to attend Harvard Law School and eventually entering ministry.[21]

Endorsements

E.W. Jackson
Current and former politicians
Organizations
Others
Ralph Northam
Current and former politicians
Organizations
Newspapers

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
E.W.
Jackson (R)
Ralph
Northam (D)
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling November 2–3, 2013 870 ± 3.3% 39% 52% 9%
Christopher Newport University October 25–30, 2013 1,038 ± 3% 35% 51% 15%
Hampton University October 24, 26–27, 2013 800 ± 2.9% 37% 43% 20%
Washington Post/Abt SRBI October 24–27, 2013 762 ± 4.5% 39% 52% 9%
Roanoke College October 21–27, 2013 838 ± 3.4% 32% 48% 21%
NBC News/Marist October 13–15, 2013 596 ± 4% 42% 48% 1% 9%
Watson Center/CNU October 8–13, 2013 753 ± 3.6% 39% 51% 10%
Watson Center/CNU October 1–6, 2013 886 ± 3.1% 37% 48% 16%
Roanoke College September 30 – October 5, 2013 1,046 ± 3% 35% 39% 26%
Hampton University September 25–29, 2013 800 ± 2.9% 39% 38% 23%
University of Mary Washington September 25–29, 2013 559 ± 4.7% 35% 39% 7% 18%
Washington Post/Abt SRBI September 19–22, 2013 562 ± 5% 42% 45% 14%
Conquest Communications September 19, 2013 400 ± 5% 29% 31% 40%
NBC/Marist September 17–19, 2013 546 ± 3% 41% 44% 15%
Roanoke College September 9–15, 2013 874 ± 3.3% 30% 34% 33%
Public Policy Polling July 11–14, 2013 601 ± 4% 35% 42% 23%
Roanoke College July 8–14, 2013 525 ± 4.3% 28% 30% 41%
Public Policy Polling May 24–26, 2013 672 ± 3.8% 29% 35% 36%

Results

Virginia lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2013[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ralph Northam 1,213,155 55.12% +11.72
Republican E.W. Jackson 980,257 44.54% -11.97
Write-ins 7,472 0.34% +0.26
Majority 232,898 10.58%
Turnout 2,200,884
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

See also

References

  1. ^ Schmidt, Markus (June 12, 2013). "Northam, Herring complete Democratic ticket". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved June 12, 2013.
  2. ^ "Democratic state Sen. Ralph S. Northam elected lieutenant governor of Virginia".
  3. ^ http://www.washingtontimes.com, The Washington Times. "Bolling ties 2013 hopes to Romney".
  4. ^ "Rep. Eric Cantor to endorse Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling over Atty. Gen. Ken Cuccinelli in governor's race". Washington Post.
  5. ^ "Virginia Politics Blog  - Bolling forms committee to run for governor in 2013".
  6. ^ "Cuccinelli denies plans for Senate run". 16 August 2011.
  7. ^ "Ken Cuccinelli announces he will run for Va. governor in 2013". Washington Post.
  8. ^ http://www.washingtontimes.com, The Washington Times. "Cuccinelli's bid for Va. governor upsets Bolling and his backers".
  9. ^ Michael Sluss (November 28, 2012). "Could Bolling run for governor as an independent?". The Roanoke Times. Retrieved December 3, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i Gunzburger, Ron. "Politics1 - Online Guide to Virginia Elections, Candidates & Politics". www.politics1.com.
  11. ^ Sluss, Michael (November 28, 2012). "Could Bolling run for governor as an independent?". The Roanoke Times. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  12. ^ a b Borden, Jeremy (April 9, 2012). "Prince William's Stewart announces run for lieutenant governor". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 3, 2012.
  13. ^ Walker, Julian (November 14, 2012). "LG race: Davis in, McWaters out". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  14. ^ Walker, Julian (December 3, 2012). "Radtke puts rumors to rest, rules out 2013 run". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved December 23, 2012.
  15. ^ "Virginia Democrat's website". Archived from the original on 2015-03-05. Retrieved 2013-05-24.
  16. ^ Sluss, Michael (December 3, 2012). "Former Del. Ward Armstrong won't run statewide in 2013". The Roanoke Times. Retrieved December 23, 2012.
  17. ^ Adams, Mason (September 21, 2012). "Roanoke Mayor David Bowers considers run for lieutenant governor in 2013". The Roanoke Times. Retrieved October 21, 2012.
  18. ^ Walker, Julian (October 15, 2012). "Miller declines LG run, eyes future Va. Senate bid". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved October 21, 2012.
  19. ^ "Our Campaigns - VA Lt. Governor - D Primary Race - Jun 11, 2013". www.ourcampaigns.com.
  20. ^ a b c d e Virginian-Pilot. "Entertainment". Virginian-Pilot.
  21. ^ a b "E.W. Jackson, Ralph Northam square off in Virginia lieutenant governor debate". Washington Post.
  22. ^ "Jackson, Northam clash in Va. debate".
  23. ^ Times-Dispatch, Markus Schmidt Richmond. "LG candidates draw sharp distinctions in debate".
  24. ^ [1]
  25. ^ FOP Endorsement Richmond Times-Dispatch
  26. ^ [2]
  27. ^ [3]
  28. ^ Times, Roanoke. "Blue Ridge Caucus". Roanoke Times.
  29. ^ [4]
  30. ^ "Welcome roanokefreepress.com - BlueHost.com". www.roanokefreepress.com.
  31. ^ [5]
  32. ^ [6]
  33. ^ "The Virginia Farm Bureau Endorses Northam".
  34. ^ [7]
  35. ^ "Editorial: McAuliffe, Northam, Herring & Simon   - Falls Church News-Press Online". 16 October 2013.
  36. ^ "Editorial: Vote for Northam".
  37. ^ [8]
  38. ^ https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpostopinions. "Virginia endorsements: Ralph Northam and Mark Herring". Washington Post.
  39. ^ "Unofficial Results - General Election - November 5, 2013". virginia.gov. Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 9 November 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2013.

External links

This page was last edited on 16 February 2020, at 10:15
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