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2012 United States presidential election in New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2012 United States presidential election in New Jersey

← 2008 November 6, 2012 2016 →
 
President Barack Obama, 2012 portrait crop.jpg
Mitt Romney by Gage Skidmore 8.jpg
Nominee Barack Obama Mitt Romney
Party Democratic Republican
Home state Illinois Massachusetts
Running mate Joe Biden Paul Ryan
Electoral vote 14 0
Popular vote 2,125,101 1,477,568
Percentage 58.38% 40.59%

New Jersey Presidential Election Results 2012.svg
County Results

2012 NJ presidential results by muni graduated.svg
Municipality Results

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Barack Obama
Democratic

The 2012 United States presidential election in New Jersey took place on November 6, 2012, as part of the 2012 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated. Voters in the state chose 14 electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama and his running mate, Vice President Joe Biden, against Republican challenger and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and his running mate, Congressman Paul Ryan.

Due to the difficulty of getting to polling places because of the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy, voters who were displaced were allowed to vote electronically. Officials were not prepared for the 15 minutes that it took to validate each request, and were deluged by voters who were not displaced asking to vote electronically, so voting was extended until Friday, November 9, at 8 PM. Requests had to be submitted by 5 PM.[1] It is likely that Obama's response to the hurricane, approved by 77% of Obama voters (with 8% disapproving and 15% unsure) and 44% (with 21% disapproving and 35% unsure) of Romney's voters, boosted his performance in New Jersey, which was hit hard by the superstorm.[2]

New Jersey was won by President Obama with 58.38% of the vote to Romney's 40.59%, a 17.79% margin of victory, an increase from 15.53% in 2008.[3] New Jersey was 1 of just 6 states to swing in President Obama's favor between 2008 and 2012, giving him the largest vote share for a Democratic presidential nominee in the state since Lyndon Johnson's 1964. Obama won over many municipalities in northeastern New Jersey that voted Republican in 2008.

In 2012, New Jersey voted 13.93% to the left of the nation as a whole.

As of the 2020 presidential election, this is the last time a Democrat has won Salem County.

Democratic primary

Incumbent Barack Obama ran unopposed[4] in the Democratic primary held on June 5, 2012. He received 283,673 votes[5] according to the Secretary of State, though county clerks' websites report write-in votes as well. The state's 172 delegates voted unanimously for Obama at the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.[6]

Republican primary

2012 New Jersey Republican presidential primary

← 2008 June 5, 2012 (2012-06-05) 2016 →
 
Mitt Romney by Gage Skidmore 8.jpg
Ron Paul, official Congressional photo portrait, 2007.jpg
Candidate Mitt Romney Ron Paul
Party Republican Republican
Home state Massachusetts Texas
Delegate count 50 0
Popular vote 188,121 24,017
Percentage 81.3% 10.4%

The Republican primary occurred on June 5, 2012.[7][8]

New Jersey sent 50 delegates to the Republican National Convention on August 5, 2012. All 50 delegates were awarded by a winner-take-all statewide vote. New Jersey Republican Party rules obligate and require the delegates to cast their vote for the winner of the primary on the first 3 ballots at the convention.[9]

New Jersey Republican primary, 2012[5]
Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
America Symbol.svg
Mitt Romney
188,121 81.3% 50
Ron Paul 24,017 10.4% 0
Rick Santorum 12,115 5.2% 0
Newt Gingrich 7,212 3.1% 0
Pledged leaders: 3
Total: 231,465 100.0% 50
Key: Withdrew prior to contest

General election

Candidate Ballot Access:[10]

Results

2012 United States presidential election in New Jersey[3]
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Barack Obama Joe Biden 2,125,101 58.38% 14
Republican Mitt Romney Paul Ryan 1,477,568 40.59% 0
Libertarian Gary Johnson Jim Gray 21,045 0.58% 0
Green Jill Stein Cheri Honkala 9,888 0.27% 0
Constitution Virgil Goode Jim Clymer 2,064 0.06% 0
Justice Rocky Anderson Luis J. Rodriguez 1,724 0.05% 0
NSA Did 911 Jeff Boss Bob Pasternak 1,007 0.03% 0
Socialist Workers James Harris Maura Deluca 710 0.02% 0
American Third Position Merlin Miller Harry Bertram 664 0.02% 0
Socialism and Liberation Peta Lindsay Yari Osorio 521 0.01% 0
Totals 3,640,292 100.00% 14
Voter Turnout (Registered) 66.4%

By county

County Obama% Obama# Romney% Romney# Johnson% Johnson# Stein% Stein# Others% Others# Total
Atlantic 57.96% 65,600 41.10% 46,522 0.51% 579 0.18% 203 0.24% 275 113,179
Bergen 55.20% 212,754 43.87% 169,070 0.45% 1,752 0.33% 1,270 0.15% 561 385,407
Burlington 58.53% 126,377 40.48% 87,401 0.63% 1,367 0.24% 528 0.12% 263 215,936
Camden 68.17% 153,682 30.82% 69,476 0.55% 1,250 0.31% 697 0.14% 323 225,428
Cape May 45.18% 21,657 53.79% 25,781 0.53% 253 0.23% 112 0.27% 128 47,932
Cumberland 61.59% 34,055 37.36% 20,658 0.51% 283 0.21% 117 0.32% 179 55,292
Essex 78.09% 236,618 21.25% 64,406 0.32% 962 0.20% 602 0.14% 431 303,019
Gloucester 54.74% 74,013 43.98% 59,456 0.77% 1,040 0.40% 539 0.11% 155 135,203
Hudson 77.52% 153,108 21.45% 42,369 0.51% 1,002 0.34% 674 0.18% 351 197,504
Hunterdon 40.42% 26,876 58.18% 38,687 0.83% 549 0.36% 238 0.22% 144 66,495
Mercer 67.99% 104,377 30.85% 47,355 0.60% 915 0.35% 530 0.22% 334 153,511
Middlesex 63.24% 190,555 35.61% 107,310 0.61% 1,851 0.28% 852 0.25% 747 301,315
Monmouth 46.89% 133,145 51.95% 147,513 0.78% 2,228 0.25% 708 0.14% 384 283,979
Morris 44.04% 100,146 54.95% 124,947 0.60% 1,375 0.21% 485 0.19% 439 227,393
Ocean 40.71% 102,300 58.29% 146,474 0.58% 1,467 0.20% 507 0.21% 525 251,274
Passaic 63.70% 115,926 35.45% 64,523 0.39% 717 0.28% 515 0.17% 307 181,988
Salem 49.89% 14,719 48.59% 14,334 0.83% 248 0.40% 121 0.26% 79 29,502
Somerset 52.19% 74,592 46.60% 66,603 0.76% 1,088 0.25% 358 0.20% 280 142,921
Sussex 38.43% 26,104 59.80% 40,625 1.11% 757 0.38% 255 0.28% 192 67,934
Union 66.60% 139,752 32.56% 68,314 0.45% 952 0.20% 410 0.19% 403 209,831
Warren 41.41% 18,745 56.87% 25,744 0.91% 410 0.37% 167 0.45% 204 45,271
Totals 58.38% 2,125,101 40.59% 1,477,568 0.58% 21,045 0.27% 9,888 0.18% 6,704 3,640,292

By congressional district

Obama won 8 of 12 congressional districts.[11]

District Obama Romney Representative
1st 65% 34% Rob Andrews
2nd 54% 45% Frank LoBiondo
3rd 52% 47% Jon Runyan
4th 45% 54% Chris Smith
5th 49% 51% Scott Garrett
6th 61% 37% Frank Pallone, Jr.
7th 46% 53% Leonard Lance
8th 78% 21% Albio Sires
9th 68% 31% Bill Pascrell
10th 88% 12% Donald M. Payne Jr.
11th 47% 52% Rodney Frelinghuysen
12th 67% 32% Rush Holt, Jr.

Analysis

New Jersey was one of just six states that voted more Democratic in 2012 than it had in 2008. In 2008, Obama won the state by roughly 602,000 votes, whereas in 2012, this margin increased to about 648,000 votes. Obama's increased statewide margin owed itself to larger Democratic margins in several central and northern counties. In Middlesex, Hudson, Passaic, and Union Counties collectively, Obama netted nearly 45,000 additional votes compared to 2008. Outside of these four counties, most others in the state had comparable margins to 2008.

Turnout patterns relative to 2008 arguably helped Obama increase his statewide margin. Every county cast fewer votes in 2012 than in 2008, but not uniformly so. Perhaps due to the effects of Hurricane Sandy, conservative Monmouth County saw the largest percentage decrease in votes cast from 2008, with Ocean County also witnessing a substantial decline in votes cast. In the northwestern part of the state, strongly Republican Sussex and Warren County experienced moderately lower turnout. In terms of raw votes cast, Passaic County, which is strongly Democratic, came closest to its 2008 figures, with just 5,000 fewer votes cast in 2012 than in 2008.

Obama's improved performance was quite unusual as his performance worsened in most other areas of the nation (particularly the Midwest and Rust Belt). It's likely this was due to his widely approved response to Hurricane Sandy, which had a devastating effect on the state, causing two million households to lose power, destroying 346,000 homes, [12] and causing blockades on bridges and roads for up to two weeks. [13] Obama's response to the so-called superstorm also likely contributed to his improved performance. According to a poll conducted by ABC News and The Washington Post, not only did 77% of Obama's voters approve of his handling of the storm (with 8% disapproving and 15% unsure), he also received a plurality amongst Romney voters, with 44% approving of his handling, 21% disapproving, and 35% unsure.[14] Another poll by the Pew Research Center found that 67% of registered voters approved of Obama's response with only 15% disapproving.[15] Chris Christie, the state's Republican governor called Obama's response to the hurricane "outstanding" and praised him for his frequent coordination with the New Jersey government, potentially boosted his popularity amongst Republican voters.[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ "New Jersey's email voting suffers major glitches, deadline extended to Friday". Retrieved 2012-11-09.
  2. ^ Clement, Jon Cohen, Peyton M. Craighill and Scott (2012-10-31). "WaPo-ABC tracking poll: High marks for President Obama on Hurricane Sandy response". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-09-03.
  3. ^ a b "New Jersey Division of Elections Official General Election Results" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 May 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2012.
  4. ^ "Official List Candidates for president For PRIMARY ELECTION 06/05/2012 Election" (PDF). New Jersey Department of State - Division of Elections. April 12, 2012. Retrieved December 11, 2012.
  5. ^ a b "Official List Candidates for president For PRIMARY ELECTION 06/05/2012 Election" (PDF). New Jersey Department of State - Division of Elections. July 23, 2012. Retrieved December 11, 2012.
  6. ^ "New Jersey Democratic Delegation 2012". The Green Papers. November 17, 2012. Retrieved December 11, 2012.
  7. ^ "Primary and Caucus Printable Calendar". CNN. Retrieved January 11, 2012.
  8. ^ "Presidential Primary Dates" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved January 23, 2012.
  9. ^ "2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses, and Conventions". The Green Papers. Retrieved March 4, 2012.
  10. ^ "Official List Candidates for president For GENERAL ELECTION 11/06/2012 Election" (PDF). New Jersey Secretary of State - Division of Elections. September 13, 2012. Retrieved December 11, 2012.
  11. ^ "Daily Kos Elections' statewide election results by congressional and legislative districts". Daily Kos. Retrieved 11 August 2020.
  12. ^ Chris Smith (New Jersey politician) (January 2, 2013). "Floor statement on Sandy supplemental" (PDF). United States House of Representatives.
  13. ^ Star-Ledger, Mike Frassinelli/The (2012-11-02). "N.J. to get $10M in emergency relief to repair roads, bridges in wake of Sandy". nj. Retrieved 2020-09-03.
  14. ^ Clement, Jon Cohen, Peyton M. Craighill and Scott (2012-10-31). "WaPo-ABC tracking poll: High marks for President Obama on Hurricane Sandy response". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-09-03.
  15. ^ Cassidy, John. "How Much Did Hurricane Sandy Help Obama?". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2020-09-03.
  16. ^ Robillard, Kevin. "Christie heaps praise on Obama". POLITICO. Retrieved 2020-09-03.

External links

This page was last edited on 27 March 2021, at 08:42
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