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2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio

← 2010 November 6, 2012 (2012-11-06) 2014 →

All 16 Ohio seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 13 5
Seats won 12 4
Seat change Decrease1 Decrease1
Popular vote 2,620,233 2,412,385
Percentage 50.96% 46.91%
Swing Decrease2.71% Increase4.79%

Ohio Congressional Districts with party colors, 2013-2015, unlabeled.svg

The 2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 to elect the 16 U.S. Representatives from the state of Ohio, a loss of two seats following the 2010 United States Census. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a quadrennial presidential election and an election to the U.S. Senate.

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  • ✪ Congressional Elections: Crash Course Government and Politics #6
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Transcription

Hi, I'm Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we're going to talk about what is, if you ask the general public, the most important part of politics: elections. If you ask me, it's hair styles. Look at Martin Van Buren's sideburns, how could he not be elected? Americans are kind of obsessed with elections, I mean when this was being recorded in early 2015, television, news and the internet were already talking about who would be Democrat and Republican candidates for president in 2016. And many of the candidates have unofficially been campaigning for years. I've been campaigning; your grandma's been campaigning. Presidential elections are exciting and you can gamble on them. Is that legal, can you gamble on them, Stan? Anyway, why we're so obsessed with them is a topic for another day. Right now I'm gonna tell you that the fixation on the presidential elections is wrong, but not because the president doesn't matter. No, today we're gonna look at the elections of the people that are supposed to matter the most, Congress. Constitutionally at least, Congress is the most important branch of government because it is the one that is supposed to be the most responsive to the people. One of the main reasons it's so responsive, at least in theory, is the frequency of elections. If a politician has to run for office often, he or she, because unlike the president we have women serving in Congress, kind of has to pay attention to what the constituents want, a little bit, maybe. By now, I'm sure that most of you have memorized the Constitution, so you recognize that despite their importance in the way we discuss politics, elections aren't really a big feature of the Constitution. Except of course for the ridiculously complex electoral college system for choosing the president, which we don't even want to think about for a few episodes. In fact, here's what the Constitution says about Congressional Elections in Article 1 Section 2: "The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature." So the Constitution does establish that the whole of the house is up for election every 2 years, and 1/3 of the senate is too, but mainly it leaves the scheduling and rules of elections up to the states. The actual rules of elections, like when the polls are open and where they actually are, as well as the registration requirements, are pretty much up to the states, subject to some federal election law. If you really want to know the rules in your state, I'm sure that someone at the Board of Elections, will be happy to explain them to you. Really, you should give them a call; they're very, very lonely. In general though, here's what we can say about American elections. First stating the super obvious, in order to serve in congress, you need to win an election. In the House of Representatives, each election district chooses a single representative, which is why we call them single-member districts. The number of districts is determined by the Census, which happens every 10 years, and which means that elections ending in zeros are super important, for reasons that I'll explain in greater detail in a future episode. It's because of gerrymandering. The Senate is much easier to figure out because both of the state Senators are elected by the entire state. It's as if the state itself were a single district, which is true for states like Wyoming, which are so unpopulated as to have only 1 representative. Sometimes these elections are called at large elections. Before the election ever happens, you need candidates. How candidates are chosen differs from state to state, but usually it has something to do with political parties, although it doesn't have to. Why are things so complicated?! What we can say is that candidates, or at least good candidates, usually have certain characteristics. Sorry America. First off, if you are gonna run for office, you should have an unblemished record, free of, oh I don't know, felony convictions or sex scandals, except maybe in Louisiana or New York. This might lead to some pretty bland candidates or people who are so calculating that they have no skeletons in their closet, but we Americans are a moral people and like our candidates to reflect our ideals rather than our reality. The second characteristic that a candidate must possess is the ability to raise money. Now some candidates are billionaires and can finance their own campaigns. But most billionaires have better things to do: buying yachts, making even more money, building money forts, buying more yachts, so they don't have time to run for office. But most candidates get their money for their campaigns by asking for it. The ability to raise money is key, especially now, because running for office is expensive. Can I get a how expensive is it? "How expensive is it?!" Well, so expensive that the prices of elections continually rises and in 2012 winners of House races spent nearly 2 million each. Senate winners spent more than 10 million. By the time this episode airs, I'm sure the numbers will be much higher like a gajillion billion million. Money is important in winning an election, but even more important, statistically, is already being in Congress. Let's go to the Thought Bubble. The person holding an office who runs for that office again is called the incumbent and has a big advantage over any challenger. This is according to political scientists who, being almost as bad at naming things as historians, refer to this as incumbency advantage. There are a number of reasons why incumbents tend to hold onto their seats in congress, if they want to. The first is that a sitting congressman has a record to run on, which we hope includes some legislative accomplishments, although for the past few Congresses, these don't seem to matter. The record might include case work, which is providing direct services to constituents. This is usually done by congressional staffers and includes things like answering questions about how to get certain government benefits or writing recommendation letters to West Point. Congressmen can also provide jobs to constituents, which is usually a good way to get them to vote for you. These are either government jobs, kind of rare these days, called patronage or indirect employment through government contracts for programs within a Congressman's district. These programs are called earmarks or pork barrel programs, and they are much less common now because Congress has decided not to use them any more, sort of. The second advantage that incumbents have is that they have a record of winning elections, which if you think about it, is pretty obvious. Being a proven winner makes it easier for a congressmen to raise money, which helps them win, and long term incumbents tend to be more powerful in Congress which makes it even easier for them to raise money and win. The Constitution give incumbents one structural advantage too. Each elected congressman is allowed $100,000 and free postage to send out election materials. This is called the franking privilege. It's not so clear how great an advantage this is in the age of the internet, but at least according to the book The Victory Lab, direct mail from candidates can be surprisingly effective. How real is this incumbency advantage? Well if you look at the numbers, it seems pretty darn real. Over the past 60 years, almost 90% of members of The House of Representatives got re-elected. The Senate has been even more volatile, but even at the low point in 1980 more than 50% of sitting senators got to keep their jobs. Thanks, Thought Bubble. You're so great. So those are some of the features of congressional elections. Now, if you'll permit me to get a little politically sciencey, I'd like to try to explain why elections are so important to the way that Congressmen and Senators do their jobs. In 1974, political scientist David Mayhew published a book in which he described something he called "The Electoral Connection." This was the idea that Congressmen were primarily motivated by the desire to get re-elected, which intuitively makes a lot of sense, even though I'm not sure what evidence he had for this conclusion. Used to be able to get away with that kind of thing I guess, clearly David may-not-hew to the rules of evidence, pun [rim shot], high five, no. Anyway Mayhew's research methodology isn't as important as his idea itself because The Electoral Connection provides a frame work for understanding congressman's activities. Mayhew divided representatives' behaviors and activities into three categories. The first is advertising; congressmen work to develop their personal brand so that they are recognizable to voters. Al D'Amato used to be know in New York as Senator Pothole, because he was able to bring home so much pork that he could actually fix New York's streets. Not by filling them with pork, money, its money, remember pork barrel spending? The second activity is credit claiming; Congressmen get things done so that they can say they got them done. A lot of case work and especially pork barrel spending are done in the name of credit claiming. Related to credit claiming, but slightly different, is position taking. This means making a public judgmental statement on something likely to be of interest to voters. Senators can do this through filibusters. Representatives can't filibuster, but they can hold hearings, publicly supporting a hearing is a way of associating yourself with an idea without having to actually try to pass legislation. And of course they can go on the TV, especially on Sunday talk shows. What's a TV, who even watches TV? Now the idea of The Electoral Connection doesn't explain every action a member of Congress takes; sometimes they actually make laws to benefit the public good or maybe solve problems, huh, what an idea! But Mayhew's idea gives us a way of thinking about Congressional activity, an analytical lens that connects what Congressmen actually do with how most of us understand Congressmen, through elections. So the next time you see a Congressmen call for a hearing on a supposed horrible scandal or read about a Senator threatening to filibuster a policy that may have significant popular support, ask yourself, "Is this Representative claiming credit or taking a position, and how will this build their brand?" In other words: what's the electoral connection and how will whatever they're doing help them get elected? This might feel a little cynical, but the reality is Mayhew's thesis often seems to fit with today's politics. Thanks for watching, see you next week. Vote for me; I'm on the TV. I'm not -- I'm on the YouTube. Crash Course: Government and Politics is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios. Support for Crash Course US Government comes from Voqal. Voqal supports nonprofits that use technology and media to advance social equity. Learn more about their mission and initiatives at Voqal.org. Crash Course is made by all of these nice people. Thanks for watching. That guy isn't nice.

Contents

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2012
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Republican 2,620,233 50.96% 13 12 -1
Democratic 2,412,385 46.91% 5 4 -1
Libertarian 81,469 1.58% 0 0 -
Green 26,070 0.51% 0 0 -
Write-In 1,969 0.04% 0 0 -
Totals 5,142,126 100% 18 16 -2

Redistricting

The redistricting process was formally begun by a legislative panel on June 16, 2011.[1] A proposal released in September 2011 would create 12 districts favoring Republicans and four which favored Democrats. In the proposal, one district which favored Republicans would be effectively eliminated, and the homes of six of the state's incumbents would be drawn into districts also containing the homes of other incumbents.[2] The map was passed by the Ohio House of Representatives on September 15[3] and by the Ohio Senate on September 21. The bill passed by the Senate included an appropriations provision intended to prevent the bill from being placed on the 2012 ballot by petition[4] and was passed again by the House the same day.[5] Governor John Kasich signed the bill into law on September 26.[6]

On September 28, the Ohio Democratic Party had filed suit in the Ohio Supreme Court, seeking a ruling on the legality of the Senate's addition of an appropriations provision.[7] On October 14, the Supreme Court ruled that a referendum on the map could go ahead. Ohioans for Fair Districts, the group calling for a referendum, asked the court to restart the 90-day time limit for the collection of signatures;[8] a request the court declined, meaning the 90-day period would begin on September 26 rather than October 14.[9] Chris Redfern, the chair of the Ohio Democratic Party, vowed to collect enough signatures to place the map on the ballot.[10]

If the map had received 66 votes in the House of Representatives, an emergency clause preventing a referendum from being held would have been invoked. As a result, in October 2011 Republicans sought the support of African American Democrats for an alternative map.[11] Later that month members of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus met with Redfern, indicating they would not immediately seek to compromise with Republicans;[12] however on October 31 Bob Bennett, the former chair of the Ohio Republican Party appointed by House Speaker William G. Batchelder to negotiate an alternative map, said he thought the two parties were close to reaching an agreement.[13]

On November 3, Batchelder brought a slightly modified map to the floor of the House of Representatives. However, the House fell eight votes short of the 66 needed to bring the map up for a vote without a committee hearing having been held.[14]

Later in November, Ohio Democratic Party communications director Seth Bringman said the referendum effort had surpassed 100,000 signatures and aimed to have collected the over 230,000 signatures necessary by December 23.[15] However, a lack of funds prevented Ohioans for Fair Districts from hiring professional signature gatherers and necessitated the exclusive use of volunteers. Redfern said in December 2011 that Democrats might return to the Supreme Court to request that it reconsider its decision on the 90-day time limit. If the signature-gathering effort had failed, an amendment to the Ohio Constitution requiring compact and competitive districts could have been sought.[16] If the Democratic Party failed to collect enough signatures, the original map would have taken effect on Christmas Day 2011.[15]

On December 14, 2011, the House of Representatives and Senate both passed a new map, effectively resolving the situation.[17]

District 1

Ohio's 1st congressional district has been represented by Republican Steve Chabot, who previously served from 1995 until 2009, since January 2011. Chabot sought and won re-election in 2012.[18]

Jeff Sinnard defeated Malcolm Kantzler by a scant 56 votes for the Democratic nomination (the reference footnote 19 provides only the unofficial, election night final tally).[19] This was Kantzler's first run for public office, while Sinnard unsuccessfully sought the Democratic nomination in the 2nd district in 2005 and 2006.[18] State representative Connie Pillich, who had considered seeking the Democratic nomination in either the 1st or 2nd district,[20] did not run.[21]

Rich Stevenson ran as the Green Party nominee. Jim Berns defeated Queen Noble for the Libertarian Party nomination.[22]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Chabot (incumbent) 57,496 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jeff Sinnard 4,561 50.3
Democratic Malcom Kantzler 4,505 49.7
Total votes 9,066 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Jim Berns 140 87.0
Libertarian Sandra Queen Noble 21 13.0
Total votes 161 100.0
Green primary results[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Rich Stevenson 93 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 1st congressional district, 2012[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Chabot (incumbent) 201,907 57.7
Democratic Jeff Sinnard 131,490 37.6
Libertarian Jim Berns 9,674 2.8
Green Rich Stevenson 6,645 1.9
Total votes 349,716 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

Republican Jean Schmidt represented Ohio's 2nd congressional district from 2005 until January 3, 2013. Brad Wenstrup, a podiatrist and U.S. Army veteran who unsuccessfully ran for mayor of Cincinnati in 2009;[28] Tony Brush;[18] Joe Green, who ran as a write-in candidate;[18] Fred Kundrata;[18] and Schmidt[18] sought the Republican nomination. Wenstrup upset Schmidt to win the nomination.[29]

William R. Smith[18] won the Democratic primary[29] against David Krikorian, who challenged Schmidt in 2008 and 2010.[30] Krikorian said in October 2011 that if he did not receive the support of the Democratic Party he would run as an independent candidate[30] but did not. State representative Connie Pillich, who had considered seeking the Democratic nomination in either the 1st or 2nd district,[20] did not run.[21]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brad Wenstrup 42,482 48.7
Republican Jean Schmidt (incumbent) 37,383 43.0
Republican Tony Brush 4,275 4.9
Republican Fred Kundrata 2,999 3.4
Republican Joe Green (write-in) 29 0.0
Total votes 87,168 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William R. Smith 10,175 50.1
Democratic David Krikorian 10,114 49.9
Total votes 20,289 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 2nd congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brad Wenstrup 194,296 58.6
Democratic William Smith 137,077 41.4
Total votes 331,373 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The new 3rd district is based in Columbus. Joyce Beatty, a vice president of the Ohio State University and former minority leader of the Ohio House of Representatives,[31] won the Democratic nomination.[19] She defeated state representative Ted Celeste;[32] former U.S. Representative Mary Jo Kilroy, who represented the 15th district from 2009 until January 2011;[33] and Columbus city council member Priscilla R. Tyson[34] Michael Coleman, the mayor of Columbus, did not run.[35]

Chris Long, a member of the Reynoldsburg city council, won the Republican nomination.[19][36]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joyce Beatty 15,848 38.3
Democratic Mary Jo Kilroy 14,369 34.8
Democratic Priscilla Tyson 6,244 15.1
Democratic Ted Celeste 4,895 11.8
Total votes 41,356 100.0
Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Long 16,711 57.5
Republican John Adams 12,335 42.5
Total votes 29,046 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Richard Ehrbar 674 100.0
Green primary results[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Bob Fitrakis 182 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 3rd congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joyce Beatty 201,897 68.3
Republican Chris Long 77,901 26.3
Libertarian Richard Ehrbar 9,462 3.2
Green Bob Fitrakis 6,387 2.2
Independent Jeff Brown (write-in) 5 0.0
Total votes 295,652 100.0

District 4

Republican Jim Jordan has represented Ohio's 4th congressional district since 2007. Jordan sought re-election in 2012.[37]

Jim Slone, a former General Motors employee, won the Democratic nomination without opposition.[19][37]

Chris Kalla ran as the Libertarian Party nominee.[37]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Jordan (incumbent) 70,470 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Slone 23,341 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Chris Kalla 25 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 4th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Jordan (incumbent) 182,643 58.3
Democratic Jim Slone 114,214 36.5
Libertarian Chris Kalla 16,141 5.2
Total votes 312,998 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

Republican Bob Latta, who has represented Ohio's 5th congressional district since 2007, sought re-election in 2012. He defeated Robert Wallis in the Republican primary.[19][38]

Angela Zimmann won the Democratic nomination without opposition.[19]

Eric Eberly ran as the Libertarian Party nominee.[38]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Latta (incumbent) 76,477 82.6
Republican Robert Wallis 16,135 17.4
Total votes 92,612 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Angela Zimmann 25,530 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Eric Eberly 338 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 5th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Latta (incumbent) 201,514 57.3
Democratic Angela Zimmann 137,806 39.2
Libertarian Eric Eberly 12,558 3.5
Total votes 351,878 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

Republican Bill Johnson, who has represented Ohio's 6th congressional district since January 2011, sought re-election in 2012. He defeated Victor Smith in the Republican primary.[19][39]

Former U.S. Representative Charlie Wilson won the Democratic nomination.[19] He previously represented the 6th district from 2007 until 2011.[40] Wilson defeated Cas Adulewicz.[39] John Boccieri, who represented the 16th district from 2009 until 2011, did not run.[35][41][42]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Johnson (incumbent) 56,905 83.9
Republican Victor Smith 10,888 16.1
Total votes 67,793 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charlie Wilson 37,374 82.2
Democratic Cas Adulewicz 8,117 17.8
Total votes 45,491 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bill
Johnson (R)
Charlie
Wilson (D)
Public Policy Polling January 18–23, 2012 768 ± 3.5% 42% 41%

Results

Ohio's 6th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Johnson (incumbent) 164,536 53.2
Democratic Charlie Wilson 144,444 46.8
Total votes 308,980 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

Republican Bob Gibbs, who has represented Ohio's 18th congressional district since January 2011, won the Republican nomination in the new 7th district.[43] He defeated pastor Hombre Liggett.[19][44]

Joyce R. Healy-Abrams, the sister of Canton mayor William J. Healy II, won the Democratic nomination.[19] Joseph Liolios had also planned to run, but failed to refile after the Ohio General Assembly modified some districts' boundaries and moved the date of the primary.[45] John Boccieri, who represented the 16th district from 2009 until 2011, will not run.[35][42] Political consultant Bill Burges suggested in September 2011 that Democratic U.S. Representative Betty Sutton, who has represented the 13th district since 2007, may seek re-election in the 7th district;[46] however in December 2011 she announced plans to run in the 16th district.[47]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Gibbs (incumbent) 54,067 79.9
Republican Hombre Liggett 13,621 20.1
Total votes 67,688 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joyce Healy-Abrams 22,486 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 7th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Gibbs (incumbent) 178,104 56.4
Democratic Joyce Healy-Abrams 137,708 43.6
Total votes 315,812 100.0
Republican hold

District 8

Ohio's 8th congressional district has been represented by Republican John Boehner, the Speaker of the House, since 1991. Boehner sought re-election in 2012.[18] David Lewis, a pro-life and Tea Party activist, unsuccessfully challenged Boehner in the Republican primary.[19][48]

No Democrat filed to challenge Boehner.[18]

Primary results

Republican primary results [49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Boehner (incumbent) 71,120 83.8
Republican David Lewis 13,733 16.2
Total votes 84,843 100.0
Republican hold

General election

Results

Ohio's 8th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Boehner (incumbent) 246,378 99.2
Independent James Condit (write-in) 1,938 0.8
Total votes 248,316 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

Democratic U.S. Representatives Marcy Kaptur, who has represented Ohio's 9th congressional district since 1983; and Dennis Kucinich, who represented Ohio's 10th congressional district from 1997 until January 3, 2013 and had considered seeking re-election in Washington[50] or in the 11th district,[51] sought re-election in the 9th district. Graham Veysey, who runs a video production company, also sought the Democratic nomination.[44] Kaptur defeated Kucinich and Veysey in the primary.[52]

Steven Kraus, an auctioneer,[44] and Samuel "Joe the Plumber" Wurzelbacher[53] both sought the Republican nomination; Wurzelbacher won.[54] Both Democratic and Republican primaries were held on March 6, 2012.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marcy Kaptur (incumbent) 42,902 56.2
Democratic Dennis Kucinich (incumbent) 30,564 40.0
Democratic Graham Vesysey 2,900 3.8
Total votes 76,366 100.0
Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Samuel Wurzelbacher 15,166 51.4
Republican Steven Kraus 14,323 48.6
Total votes 29,489 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Sean Stipe 170 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 9th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marcy Kaptur (incumbent) 217,771 73.1
Republican Samuel Wurzelbacher 68,668 23.0
Libertarian Sean Stipe 11,725 3.9
Total votes 298,164 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

Republican U.S. Representative Mike Turner, who has represented Ohio's 3rd congressional district since 2003, sought re-election in the new 10th district in 2012.[55] John D. Anderson and Edward Breen also unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination.[19][56] Steve Austria, who is also a Republican and has represented the 7th district since 2009, had also been expected to run,[55] but announced in December 2011 that he would retire rather than seek re-election.[57]

Six candidates qualified for the ballot in the Democratic primary. Sharen Neuhardt won the March primary with a plurality of 36% of the vote.[58] She is an attorney and was the 2008 nominee for congress in Ohio's 7th congressional district, held by Republican Steve Austria. He defeated her 58%-42%[59] in a district McCain won 54%-45%. She underperformed Obama three points. However, this district McCain won 50%-49%.[60]

David Harlow is the Libertarian nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Turner (Incumbent) 65,574 80.1
Republican John D. Anderson 14,435 17.6
Republican Edward Breen 1,839 2.3
Total votes 81,848 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sharen Neuhardt 7,705 35.7
Democratic Olivia Freeman 5,530 25.6
Democratic David Esrati 2,952 13.7
Democratic Tom McMasters 2,212 10.2
Democratic Ryan Steele 1,644 7.6
Democratic Mack VanAllen 1,530 7.1
Total votes 21,573 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian David Harlow 136 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 10th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Turner (incumbent) 208,201 59.5
Democratic Sharen Neuhardt 131,097 37.5
Libertarian David Harlow 10,373 3.0
Total votes 349,671 100.0
Republican hold

District 11

Ohio's 11th congressional district has been represented by Democrat Marcia Fudge since 2008. Fudge sought re-election in 2012.[44] Gerald Henley, a former member of the Cleveland school board who unsuccessfully ran for the Cuyahoga County Council as an independent in 2010; Marie Jefferson; and Isaac Powell, who unsuccessfully challenged Fudge in the 2008 and 2010 Democratic primaries, unsuccessfully sought the Democratic nomination.[19][61] U.S. Representative Dennis Kucinich, who has represented the 10th district since 1997 and had considered seeking re-election in the 11th district, instead ran in the 9th district;[51] while state senator Nina Turner, who had planned to challenge Fudge in the Democratic primary, announced in December 2011 that she would not run. Turner considered run as an independent candidate, but instead elected to remain in the State Senate.[44]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marcia Fudge (incumbent) 65,333 89.4
Democratic Gerald Carver Henley 4,570 6.3
Democratic Isaac Powell 3,169 4.3
Total votes 73,072 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 11th congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marcia Fudge (incumbent) 258,359 100.0
Total votes 258,359 100.0
Democratic hold

District 12

Ohio's 12th congressional district has been represented by Republican Pat Tiberi since 2001. Tiberi sought re-election in 2012. He defeated William Yarbrough to win the Republican nomination.[19][62]

Doug Litt, who is employed by Spherion Staffing at Gorman-Rupp and unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the 4th district in 2010;[63] and James Reese[62] sought the Democratic nomination. Reese won the nomination with nearly 70% of the vote.[19]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pat Tiberi (incumbent) 72,560 77.9
Republican Bill Yarbrough 20,610 22.1
Total votes 93,170 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Reese 14,312 69.9
Democratic Doug Litt 6,165 30.1
Total votes 20,477 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 12th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pat Tiberi (incumbent) 233,869 63.5
Democratic Jim Reese 134,605 36.5
Total votes 368,474 100.0
Republican hold

District 13

Democrat Betty Sutton, who has represented Ohio's 13th congressional district since 2007, sought re-election in the new 16th district in 2012.[47] Tim Ryan, who has represented the now-defunct 17th district since 2003, ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination in the new 13th district.[47] John Stephen Luchansky and Lisa Regula Meyer had also filed to seek the Democratic nomination, however both failed to refile after the Ohio General Assembly modified some districts' boundaries and moved the date of the primary.[64]

Pediatrician Marisha Agana ran unopposed for the Republican nomination.[44]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tim Ryan (incumbent) 56,670 100.0
Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Marisha Agana 27,754 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 13th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tim Ryan (incumbent) 235,492 72.8
Republican Marisha Agana 88,120 27.2
Total votes 323,612 100.0
Democratic hold

District 14

Republican Steve LaTourette, who had represented Ohio's 14th congressional district since 1995, was expected to seek re-election (and ran unopposed in the party primary),[44] but announced on July 31, 2012 that he was retiring at the end of the term. He officially withdrew from the ballot on August 8, allowing the party chairmen from the seven counties in the district to select a replacement nominee.[65]

Geauga County Prosecutor David Joyce was chosen as the Republican nominee.[66] Other possible replacements that had been mentioned include Willoughby-Eastlake School Board member Paul Brickner;[67] former state Senator Kevin Coughlin;[68] Lake County Judge Vince Culotta;[68] former state Representative Matt Dolan;[68] former state Senator Tim Grendell;[68] state Senator Frank LaRose;[68] Cuyahoga County Councilman Jack Schron;[67] and, state Representative Ron Young.[67]

Dale Virgil Blanchard, an accountant and perennial candidate, received the Democratic nomination unopposed.[44][67]

Elaine Mastromatteo ran as the Green Party nominee. David Macko ran as the Libertarian Party nominee.[44]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve LaTourette (incumbent) 69,551 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dale Blanchard 29,508 100.0
Green primary results[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Elaine Mastromatteo 94 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian David Macko 221 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 14th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Joyce 183,657 54.0
Democratic Dale Blanchard 131,637 38.7
Green Elaine Mastromatteo 13,038 3.9
Libertarian David Macko 11,536 3.4
Independent Aaron Zurbrugg (write-in) 20 0.0
Independent Steven Winfield (write-in) 5 0.0
Independent Erick Donald Robinson (write-in) 1 0.0
Total votes 339,894 100.0

District 15

Republican Steve Stivers, who has represented Ohio's 15th congressional district since January 2011, sought re-election in 2012.[69] Ralph Applegate and Charles Chope also unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination.[19][70]

Pat Lang, the Athens city law director, defeated Scott Wharton, a farmer and pilot to win the Democratic nomination.[19][70]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Stivers (incumbent) 70,191 89.3
Republican Charles S. Chope 8,404 10.7
Total votes 78,595 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pat Lang 16,483 56.7
Democratic Scott Wharton 12,599 43.3
Total votes 29,082 100.0

General election

Results

Ohio's 15th congressional district, 2012 [71]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Stivers (incumbent) 205,274 61.6
Democratic Pat Lang 128,188 38.4
Total votes 333,462 100.0
Republican hold

District 16

Ohio's 16th congressional district has been represented by Republican Jim Renacci since January 2011. Renacci sought re-election 2012.[44]

Democratic U.S. Representative Betty Sutton, who had represented the 13th district since 2007, ran in the new 16th district in 2012.[47] Former U.S. Representative John Boccieri, a Democrat who represented the district from 2009 until 2011, did not run.[35][42]

Jeffrey Blevins, a restaurant manager who unsuccessfully ran as the Libertarian Party nominee in 2010, ran again[45] but withdrew on August 23, 2012.[72]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Renacci (incumbent) 66,487 100.0
Democratic primary results[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Betty Sutton (incumbent) 37,232 100.0
Libertarian primary results[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Jeffrey Blevins 135 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jim
Renacci (R)
Betty
Sutton (D)
Public Policy Polling January 18–23, 2012 812 ± 3.4% 46% 46%

Results

Ohio's 16th congressional district, 2012 [27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Renacci (incumbent) 185,165 52.0
Democratic Betty Sutton (incumbent) 170,600 48.0
Total votes 355,765 100.0
Republican hold

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External links

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