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2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Illinois

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Illinois

← 2010 November 6, 2012 (2012-11-06) 2014 →

All 18 Illinois seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 8 11
Seats won 12 6
Seat change Increase4 Decrease5
Popular vote 2,799,570 2,002,848
Percentage 57.07% 40.83%
Swing Increase6.31% Decrease5.70%

The 2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Illinois were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 to elect the 18 U.S. Representatives from the state, one from each of the state's 18 congressional districts, a loss of one seat following the 2010 United States Census. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a quadrennial presidential election. Primary elections were held on March 20, 2012.[1]

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Transcription

Hi, I'm Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we're going to talk about what is, if you ask the general public, the most important part of politics: elections. If you ask me, it's hair styles. Look at Martin Van Buren's sideburns, how could he not be elected? Americans are kind of obsessed with elections, I mean when this was being recorded in early 2015, television, news and the internet were already talking about who would be Democrat and Republican candidates for president in 2016. And many of the candidates have unofficially been campaigning for years. I've been campaigning; your grandma's been campaigning. Presidential elections are exciting and you can gamble on them. Is that legal, can you gamble on them, Stan? Anyway, why we're so obsessed with them is a topic for another day. Right now I'm gonna tell you that the fixation on the presidential elections is wrong, but not because the president doesn't matter. No, today we're gonna look at the elections of the people that are supposed to matter the most, Congress. Constitutionally at least, Congress is the most important branch of government because it is the one that is supposed to be the most responsive to the people. One of the main reasons it's so responsive, at least in theory, is the frequency of elections. If a politician has to run for office often, he or she, because unlike the president we have women serving in Congress, kind of has to pay attention to what the constituents want, a little bit, maybe. By now, I'm sure that most of you have memorized the Constitution, so you recognize that despite their importance in the way we discuss politics, elections aren't really a big feature of the Constitution. Except of course for the ridiculously complex electoral college system for choosing the president, which we don't even want to think about for a few episodes. In fact, here's what the Constitution says about Congressional Elections in Article 1 Section 2: "The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature." So the Constitution does establish that the whole of the house is up for election every 2 years, and 1/3 of the senate is too, but mainly it leaves the scheduling and rules of elections up to the states. The actual rules of elections, like when the polls are open and where they actually are, as well as the registration requirements, are pretty much up to the states, subject to some federal election law. If you really want to know the rules in your state, I'm sure that someone at the Board of Elections, will be happy to explain them to you. Really, you should give them a call; they're very, very lonely. In general though, here's what we can say about American elections. First stating the super obvious, in order to serve in congress, you need to win an election. In the House of Representatives, each election district chooses a single representative, which is why we call them single-member districts. The number of districts is determined by the Census, which happens every 10 years, and which means that elections ending in zeros are super important, for reasons that I'll explain in greater detail in a future episode. It's because of gerrymandering. The Senate is much easier to figure out because both of the state Senators are elected by the entire state. It's as if the state itself were a single district, which is true for states like Wyoming, which are so unpopulated as to have only 1 representative. Sometimes these elections are called at large elections. Before the election ever happens, you need candidates. How candidates are chosen differs from state to state, but usually it has something to do with political parties, although it doesn't have to. Why are things so complicated?! What we can say is that candidates, or at least good candidates, usually have certain characteristics. Sorry America. First off, if you are gonna run for office, you should have an unblemished record, free of, oh I don't know, felony convictions or sex scandals, except maybe in Louisiana or New York. This might lead to some pretty bland candidates or people who are so calculating that they have no skeletons in their closet, but we Americans are a moral people and like our candidates to reflect our ideals rather than our reality. The second characteristic that a candidate must possess is the ability to raise money. Now some candidates are billionaires and can finance their own campaigns. But most billionaires have better things to do: buying yachts, making even more money, building money forts, buying more yachts, so they don't have time to run for office. But most candidates get their money for their campaigns by asking for it. The ability to raise money is key, especially now, because running for office is expensive. Can I get a how expensive is it? "How expensive is it?!" Well, so expensive that the prices of elections continually rises and in 2012 winners of House races spent nearly 2 million each. Senate winners spent more than 10 million. By the time this episode airs, I'm sure the numbers will be much higher like a gajillion billion million. Money is important in winning an election, but even more important, statistically, is already being in Congress. Let's go to the Thought Bubble. The person holding an office who runs for that office again is called the incumbent and has a big advantage over any challenger. This is according to political scientists who, being almost as bad at naming things as historians, refer to this as incumbency advantage. There are a number of reasons why incumbents tend to hold onto their seats in congress, if they want to. The first is that a sitting congressman has a record to run on, which we hope includes some legislative accomplishments, although for the past few Congresses, these don't seem to matter. The record might include case work, which is providing direct services to constituents. This is usually done by congressional staffers and includes things like answering questions about how to get certain government benefits or writing recommendation letters to West Point. Congressmen can also provide jobs to constituents, which is usually a good way to get them to vote for you. These are either government jobs, kind of rare these days, called patronage or indirect employment through government contracts for programs within a Congressman's district. These programs are called earmarks or pork barrel programs, and they are much less common now because Congress has decided not to use them any more, sort of. The second advantage that incumbents have is that they have a record of winning elections, which if you think about it, is pretty obvious. Being a proven winner makes it easier for a congressmen to raise money, which helps them win, and long term incumbents tend to be more powerful in Congress which makes it even easier for them to raise money and win. The Constitution give incumbents one structural advantage too. Each elected congressman is allowed $100,000 and free postage to send out election materials. This is called the franking privilege. It's not so clear how great an advantage this is in the age of the internet, but at least according to the book The Victory Lab, direct mail from candidates can be surprisingly effective. How real is this incumbency advantage? Well if you look at the numbers, it seems pretty darn real. Over the past 60 years, almost 90% of members of The House of Representatives got re-elected. The Senate has been even more volatile, but even at the low point in 1980 more than 50% of sitting senators got to keep their jobs. Thanks, Thought Bubble. You're so great. So those are some of the features of congressional elections. Now, if you'll permit me to get a little politically sciencey, I'd like to try to explain why elections are so important to the way that Congressmen and Senators do their jobs. In 1974, political scientist David Mayhew published a book in which he described something he called "The Electoral Connection." This was the idea that Congressmen were primarily motivated by the desire to get re-elected, which intuitively makes a lot of sense, even though I'm not sure what evidence he had for this conclusion. Used to be able to get away with that kind of thing I guess, clearly David may-not-hew to the rules of evidence, pun [rim shot], high five, no. Anyway Mayhew's research methodology isn't as important as his idea itself because The Electoral Connection provides a frame work for understanding congressman's activities. Mayhew divided representatives' behaviors and activities into three categories. The first is advertising; congressmen work to develop their personal brand so that they are recognizable to voters. Al D'Amato used to be know in New York as Senator Pothole, because he was able to bring home so much pork that he could actually fix New York's streets. Not by filling them with pork, money, its money, remember pork barrel spending? The second activity is credit claiming; Congressmen get things done so that they can say they got them done. A lot of case work and especially pork barrel spending are done in the name of credit claiming. Related to credit claiming, but slightly different, is position taking. This means making a public judgmental statement on something likely to be of interest to voters. Senators can do this through filibusters. Representatives can't filibuster, but they can hold hearings, publicly supporting a hearing is a way of associating yourself with an idea without having to actually try to pass legislation. And of course they can go on the TV, especially on Sunday talk shows. What's a TV, who even watches TV? Now the idea of The Electoral Connection doesn't explain every action a member of Congress takes; sometimes they actually make laws to benefit the public good or maybe solve problems, huh, what an idea! But Mayhew's idea gives us a way of thinking about Congressional activity, an analytical lens that connects what Congressmen actually do with how most of us understand Congressmen, through elections. So the next time you see a Congressmen call for a hearing on a supposed horrible scandal or read about a Senator threatening to filibuster a policy that may have significant popular support, ask yourself, "Is this Representative claiming credit or taking a position, and how will this build their brand?" In other words: what's the electoral connection and how will whatever they're doing help them get elected? This might feel a little cynical, but the reality is Mayhew's thesis often seems to fit with today's politics. Thanks for watching, see you next week. Vote for me; I'm on the TV. I'm not -- I'm on the YouTube. Crash Course: Government and Politics is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios. Support for Crash Course US Government comes from Voqal. Voqal supports nonprofits that use technology and media to advance social equity. Learn more about their mission and initiatives at Voqal.org. Crash Course is made by all of these nice people. Thanks for watching. That guy isn't nice.

Contents

Redistricting

A redistricting bill was introduced to the Illinois General Assembly by members of the Democratic Party in May 2011. Although Representatives are not required to live within their districts, the new map drew the homes of at least five Republican incumbents into districts where they would have to run against other Republicans, and others into districts which strongly favor Democrats.

After an amendment which modified the 13th and 15th districts was passed with Republican support,[2][3] the new map was passed by the Illinois House of Representatives on May 30, 2011[4] and the Senate on May 31.[5] Governor Pat Quinn, a Democrat, signed the map into law on June 24. Republican members of the congressional delegation planned to mount a legal challenge.[6]

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Illinois, 2012[7]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Democratic 2,799,570 57.07% 8 12 +4
Republican 2,002,848 40.83% 11 6 -5
Others 102,826 2.16% 0 0 -
Totals 4,905,244 100.00% 19 18 -1

District 1

The 1st district, which has been represented by Democrat Bobby Rush since 1993, had seen a decline in population and so now extends into the Chicago suburbs and rural areas of Will County.[8]

Democratic primary

Candidates
  • Harold Bailey[9]
  • Raymond Lodato[9]
  • Bobby Rush, incumbent[9]
  • Clifford Russell Jr.[9]
  • Jordan Sims, political commentator for an online newspaper[10]
  • Fred Smith[9]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bobby Rush (incumbent) 64,533 83.9
Democratic Raymond Lodato 3,210 4.2
Democratic Harold Bailey 2,598 3.4
Democratic Clifford Russell, Jr. 2,412 3.1
Democratic Fred Smith 2,232 2.9
Democratic Jordan Sims 1,980 2.6
Total votes 76,965 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Donald Peloquin 16,355 69.2
Republican Frederick Collins 5,773 24.4
Republican Jimmy Lee Tillman II 1,501 6.4
Total votes 23,629 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 1st congressional district, 2012 [13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bobby Rush (incumbent) 236,854 73.8
Republican Donald Peloquin 83,989 26.2
Independent John Hawkins (write-in) 1 0.0
Total votes 320,844 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

The new 2nd district stretches from Kankakee County, through Will County and to Chicago.[14] Democrat Jesse Jackson, Jr., who had represented the 2nd district since 1999, sought re-election.[9]

Republican Adam Kinzinger, who was first elected to represent the 11th district in 2010 and now lives in the 2nd district, sought re-election in the 16th district.[15]

Jesse Jackson, Jr. resigned his seat in the 112th Congress on November 21, 2012, and also resigned his seat in the 113th Congress on the same day. As a result, no one was seated in the 113th Congress for the 2nd congressional District and a Special Election was called for April, 2013, to fill the vacancy.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Debbie Halvorson Jesse Jackson, Jr. Undecided
We Ask America February 21, 2012 1,294 ± 2.72% 32% 54% 14%

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jesse Jackson, Jr. (incumbent) 56,109 71.2
Democratic Debbie Halvorson 22,672 28.8
Total votes 78,781 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Woodworth 11,123 63.7
Republican James Taylor, Sr. 6,347 36.3
Total votes 17,470 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 2nd congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jesse Jackson, Jr. (incumbent) 188,303 63.3
Republican Brian Woodworth 69,115 23.2
Independent Marcus Lewis 40,006 13.4
Independent Anthony W. Williams (write-in) 288 0.1
Total votes 297,712 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3

The 3rd district, which has been represented by Democrat Dan Lipinski since 2005, now extends to Bridgeport, Chicago and Lockport, Will County.[8] Lipinski sought re-election.

Democratic primary

Insurance executive and health care activist John Atkinson was expected to challenge incumbent Lipinski, and raised over $535,000 in the first quarter of 2011,[17] but no longer lives in Lipinski's district. Atkinson had considered instead running in the 11th district,[8][18] but suspended his campaign on June 14, 2011.[19]

Candidates
  • Farah Baqai, police officer[20]
  • Dan Lipinski, incumbent

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Lipinski (incumbent) 44,532 87.3
Democratic Farah Baqai 6,463 12.7
Total votes 50,995 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates
  • Richard Grabowski, manufacturing company supervisor
  • Jim Falvey, attorney
  • Arthur J. Jones, insurance sales representative[20]

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Grabowski 20,895 59.3
Republican Jim Falvey 10,449 29.7
Republican Arthur Jones 3,861 11.0
Total votes 35,205 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 3rd congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Lipinski (incumbent) 168,738 68.5
Republican Richard Grabowski 77,653 31.5
Independent Laura Anderson (write-in) 7 0.0
Total votes 246,398 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4

The 4th district, which has been represented by Democrat Luis Gutiérrez since 1993, was extended to incorporate Gutiérrez's new home in Portage Park.[8]

Democratic primary

Gutiérrez secured the Democratic nomination by defeating Jorge Zavala, who has taught with the City Colleges of Chicago and ran as a write-in candidate since he had been removed from the ballot by the Illinois Board of Elections in January 2012.[21][22]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Luis Gutiérrez (incumbent) 30,908 100.0
Democratic Jorge Zavala (write-in) 6 0.0
Total votes 30,914 100.0

Republican primary

Héctor Concepción, a former director of the Puerto Rican chamber of commerce, had been removed from the ballot by the Illinois Board of Elections in January 2012,[21][23] but since refiled and challenged Gutiérrez as the Republican nominee in the general election.[24]

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Héctor Concepción (write-in) 10 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 4th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Luis Gutiérrez (incumbent) 133,226 83.0
Republican Héctor Concepción 27,279 17.0
Independent Ymelda Viramontes 4 0.0
Total votes 160,509 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5

The 5th district, which has been represented by Democrat Mike Quigley since 2009, was redrawn to include Franklin Park, Elmwood Park, Hinsdale, Oak Brook, River Grove, Schiller Park and parts of Melrose Park, Stone Park and the North Side of Chicago. Quigley sought re-election.[20]

Dan Schmitt, who is self-employed, won the Republican nomination with no opposition.[20]

Nancy Wade, a community activist, ran as the Green Party nominee.[25]

Democratic primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Quigley (incumbent) 37,967 100.0
Total votes 37,967 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Schmitt 23,940 100.0
Total votes 23,940 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 5th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Quigley (incumbent) 177,729 65.7
Republican Dan Schmitt 77,289 28.6
Green Nancy Wade 15,359 5.7
Total votes 270,377 100.0
Democratic hold

District 6

The 6th district, which has been represented by Republican Peter Roskam since 2007, is one of two districts which were expected to remain strongly favorable to Republicans,[26] although it has been redrawn to include Algonquin, Barrington, Cary, Downers Grove, Glen Ellyn, Lake in the Hills, Lake Zurich, Palatine, South Elgin, West Chicago, Westmont and Wheaton.[20][27] Roskam ran unopposed in the Republican primary.

Khizar Jafri, a traffic analyst, ran as an Independent.[28]

Democratic primary

Candidates
Disqualified

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Leslie Coolidge 9,919 54.5
Democratic Maureen Yates 5,934 32.6
Democratic Geoffrey Petzel 2,343 12.9
Total votes 18,196 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Peter Roskam (incumbent) 76,146 100.0
Total votes 76,146 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 6th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Peter Roskam (incumbent) 193,138 59.2
Democratic Leslie Coolidge 132,991 40.8
Total votes 326,129 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The 7th district, which has been represented by Democrat Danny K. Davis since 1997, was redrawn to include parts of LaGrange Park and Westchester. Davis sought re-election. Rita Zak challenged Davis as the Republican nominee.[34]

Democratic primary

Candidates
  • Jacques A. Conway, pastor and retired police officer[20]
  • Danny Davis, incumbent

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Danny Davis (incumbent) 57,896 84.5
Democratic Jacques Conway 10,638 15.5
Total votes 68,534 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 7th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Danny K. Davis (incumbent) 242,439 84.6
Republican Rita Zak 31,466 11.0
Independent John Monaghan 12,523 4.4
Independent Phil Collins (write-in) 5 0.0
Independent Dennis Richter (write-in) 2 0.0
Total votes 286,435 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8

Republican Joe Walsh, who was first elected to represent the 8th district in 2010, ran for re-election despite no longer living within the redrawn boundaries of the district. Walsh had initially decided to run in the redrawn 14th district.[35]

Walsh and Duckworth scheduled four debates. The first was held on May 12, 2012 on CLTV, the second on September 14 in West Dundee at Heritage Fest, the third on October 9 on WCPT and WIND at the Meadows Club in Rolling Meadows, open to 8th district residents. The fourth was held on October 18 on WTTW’s Chicago Tonight.[36]

The Chicago Tribune endorsed Duckworth over Walsh on October 8, 2012,[37] as did the Daily Herald.[38]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tammy Duckworth 17,097 66.2
Democratic Raja Krishnamoorthi 8,736 33.8
Total votes 25,833 100.0

Republican primary

Walsh defeated write-in candidate Robert Canfield, a business owner who had planned to challenge him in the Republican primary before being removed from the ballot by the Illinois Board of Elections.[41]

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Walsh (Incumbent) 35,102 99.9
Republican Robert Canfield (write-in) 54 0.1
Total votes 35,156 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 8th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tammy Duckworth 123,206 54.7
Republican Joe Walsh (Incumbent) 101,860 45.3
Total votes 225,066 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 9

Democrat Jan Schakowsky, who had represented the 9th district since 1999, sought re-election.[42]

Robert Dold, who was first elected to represent the 10th district in 2010, lives in the new 9th district,[8] but sought re-election in the 10th.[43]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jan Schakowsky (incumbent) 48,124 91.9
Democratic Simon Ribeiro 4,270 8.1
Total votes 52,394 100.0

Republican primary

Timothy Wolfe, an accountant, sought and received the Republican nomination unopposed.[42] He earned the endorsement of the Chicago Tribune.[45]

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Timothy Wolfe 32,043 100.0
Total votes 32,043 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 9th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jan Schakowsky (incumbent) 194,869 66.3
Republican Timothy Wolfe 98,924 33.7
Independent Hilaire Fuji Shioura (write-in) 8 0.0
Independent Susanne Atanus (write-in) 6 0.0
Total votes 293,807 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

Robert Dold, who was first elected to represent the 10th district in 2010, will seek re-election.[43] Dold no longer lives in the redrawn district,[8] but would move into the district if he won re-election.[43]

Democratic primary

Candidates
Disqualified

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Schneider 15,530 46.9
Democratic Ilya Sheyman 12,767 38.5
Democratic John Tree 2,938 8.9
Democratic Vivek Bavda 1,881 5.7
Democratic Aloys Rutagwibira (write-in) 8 0.0
Total votes 33,124 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Dold (incumbent) 36,647 100.0
Total votes 36,647 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Robert
Dold (R)
Brad
Schneider (D)
Undecided
Greenberg, Quinlan Rosner August 8–12, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 46% 46% 8%
McLaughlin & Associates June 20–21, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 42% 32% 26%
Normington, Petts & Associates May 21–23, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 39% 39% 22%

Results

Illinois' 10th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Schneider 133,890 50.6
Republican Bob Dold (incumbent) 130,564 49.4
Total votes 264,454 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 11

The newly drawn 11th district is the successor to the old 13th District, which has been represented by Republican Judy Biggert since 1999. While the reconfigured district contains half of Biggert's former territory, it was made significantly more Democratic than before. It now includes the Democratic-leaning areas of Joliet and Aurora. Biggert's home in Hinsdale was drawn into the 5th District, but she sought reelection in this district.[8]

Democratic primary

Candidates
  • Bill Foster, former U.S. Representative from 2008 to 2011
  • James Hickey, president of the Orland Fire Protection District
  • Juan Thomas, former Aurora Township clerk [12]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Foster 12,126 58.5
Democratic Juan Thomas 5,212 25.1
Democratic Jim Hickey 3,399 16.4
Total votes 20,737 100.0

Republican primary

Biggert won the primary against nominal write-in opposition from Harris.

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Judy Biggert (incumbent) 31,471 99.9
Republican Diane Harris (write-in) 37 0.1
Total votes 31,508 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Judy
Biggert (R)
Bill
Foster (D)
Undecided
Global Strategy Group (D-Foster) August 27–29, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 43% 42% 15%

Results

Illinois' 11th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Foster 148,928 58.6
Republican Judy Biggert (incumbent) 105,348 41.4
Independent Chris Michel (write-in) 19 0.0
Total votes 254,295 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 12

Democrat Jerry Costello, who had represented the 12th district since 1988, decided to retire rather than run for re-election.[51]

Paula Bradshaw, a registered nurse, ran as the Green Party nominee.[52] Retha Daugherty, a small-business owner and resident of Carbondale, had announced her intentions to be on the ballot as an Independent candidate,[53] but had to drop her bid in April 2012 because of a change in state election law.[54]

Democratic primary

Miller ended his campaign in February 2012 and endorsed Harriman (but remained on the primary ballot).[55]

In May 2012, however, Harriman dropped out of the race because of an illness; that left the decision of whom to name as a replacement candidate up to a committee that included the 12 Democratic county chairmen in the district and Rep. Costello.[56] The committee unanimously selected Major General (ret.) and Adjutant General of Illinois William Enyart as the replacement nominee on June 23.[57][58]

Candidates
Withdrew

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Harriman 27,409 69.8
Democratic Chris Miller 8,874 22.6
Democratic Kenneth Wiezer 2,967 7.6
Total votes 39,250 100.0

Republican primary

Jason Plummer at an event in Bethalto, Illinois, 2011
Jason Plummer at an event in Bethalto, Illinois, 2011
Candidates
Disqualified
  • Teri Newman, businesswoman and 2010 Republican nominee for IL-12[65] [66]

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jason Plummer 25,280 55.7
Republican Rodger Cook 16,313 35.9
Republican Theresa Kormos 3,811 8.4
Total votes 45,404 100.0


General election

Polling

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample size Margin of error Jason
Plummer (R)
Bill
Enyart (D)
Undecided
Public Opinion Strategies August 1–2, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 45% 28% 27%
We Ask America July 9, 2012 1510 ± 2.5% 45% 34% 21%

Results

Illinois' 12th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Enyart 157,000 51.7
Republican Jason Plummer 129,902 42.7
Green Paula Bradshaw 17,045 5.6
Independent Shon-Tiyon Horton (write-in) 2 0.0
Total votes 303,947 100.0
Democratic hold

District 13

The new 13th is the successor to the old 15th District, represented by Republican Tim Johnson since 2001.

John Hartman, a medical technology company CFO, ran as an independent candidate.[67]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Gill 15,536 50.3
Democratic Matt Goetten 15,373 49.7
Total votes 30,909 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates
  • Michael Firsching, veterinarian[70]
  • Tim Johnson, incumbent
  • Frank Metzger, retired ironworker[71]

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Johnson (incumbent) 35,655 68.7
Republican Frank Metzger 9,571 18.4
Republican Michael Firsching 6,706 12.9
Total votes 51,932 100.0

Republican convention

Although Johnson won the primary, in April 2012, he chose to retire rather than seek re-election.[72][73] A convention was held on May 19, 2012, to choose a replacement nominee. The 14 GOP county chairmen in the district unanimously selected Rodney Davis as the party nominee.[74]

Candidates

General election

Polling

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Rodney
Davis (R)
David
Gill (D)
Undecided
We Ask America June 7, 2012 1,299 ± 2.79% 47% 38% 15%

Results

Illinois' 13th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney L. Davis 137,034 46.6
Democratic David Gill 136,032 46.2
Independent John Hartman 21,319 7.2
Total votes 294,385 100.0
Republican hold

District 14

The redrawn 14th district includes McHenry County and parts of DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, and Will counties.[75] Republican Randy Hultgren, who was first elected to represent the 14th district in 2010, ran for re-election.[76] Fellow Republican Joe Walsh, who was first elected to represent the 8th district in 2010 and had planned to challenge Hultgren in the Republican primary, instead sought re-election in the redrawn 8th district.[35]

Democratic primary

Bill Foster, a Democrat who represented the 14th district from 2008 until 2011, decided to run in the 11th district in 2012, although some Illinois General Assembly leaders had hoped he would run in the 14th district, where his home is located.[18]

Candidates

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dennis Anderson 9,344 74.2
Democratic Jonathan Farnick 3,258 25.8
Total votes 12,602 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Hultgren (incumbent) 64,419 100.0
Republican Mark Mastrogiovanni (write-in) 1 0.0
Total votes 64,420 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 14th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Hultgren (incumbent) 177,603 58.8
Democratic Dennis Anderson 124,351 41.2
Total votes 301,954 100.0
Republican hold

District 15

Republican John Shimkus, who had represented the now-obsolete 19th district since 2003 and represented the 20th district (eliminated after redistricting following the 2000 Census) from 1997 until 2003, sought re-election in the new 15th district.[78]

Democratic primary

Angela Michael, a retired nurse, won the Democratic nomination without opposition.[79]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Angela Michael 16,831 100.0
Total votes 16,831 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John M. Shimkus (incumbent) 66,709 100.0
Total votes 66,709 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 15th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Shimkus (incumbent) 205,775 68.6
Democratic Angela Michael 94,162 31.4
Total votes 299,937 100.0
Republican hold

District 16

In redistricting, the 16th district was moved south to incorporate Livingston and Iroquois Counties and parts of Ford County.[80] Republican U.S. Representatives Adam Kinzinger, who had represented the 11th district since January 2011,[15] and Don Manzullo, who had represented the 16th district since 1993,[81] sought re-election in the new 16th district.

Wanda Rohl, a social worker, was chosen by the district Democratic leaders on May 8, 2012 to run as the party nominee against Kinzinger.[82]

Bronco Bojovic, a businessman, had planned to run as an Independent candidate but dropped out of the race in February 2012.[83][84]

Republican primary

Candidates
  • Adam Kinzinger, incumbent from IL-11
  • Don Manzullo, incumbent from IL-16

Polling

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Adam Kinzinger Don Manzullo Undecided
We Ask America March 11–12, 2012 1,605 ± 2.44% 42% 43% 15%
We Ask America February 19–20, 2012 1,395 ± 2.62% 47% 34% 19%

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Adam Kinzinger (incumbent) 45,546 53.9
Republican Don Manzullo (Incumbent) 38,889 46.1
Total votes 84,435 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 16th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Adam Kinzinger (incumbent) 181,789 61.8
Democratic Wanda Rohl 112,301 38.2
Total votes 294,090 100.0
Republican hold

District 17

The 17th district, based in Rock Island and Moline, was extended to include most of Rockford and the more Democratic areas of Peoria and Tazewell County, thereby making it more favorable to Democrats.[85] Republican Bobby Schilling, who had represented the district since January 2011, ran for re-election.[86]

Attorney Eric Reyes, who had announced he would seek the Democratic nomination,[87] ran as an independent candidate.[88]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cheri Bustos 18,652 54.4
Democratic George Gaulrupp 8,838 25.8
Democratic Greg Aguilar 6,798 19.8
Total votes 34,288 100.0

Republican primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bobby Schilling (incumbent) 46,263 100.0
Total votes 46,623 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bobby
Schilling (R)
Cheri
Bustos (D)
Undecided
We Ask America October 28, 2012 1,325 ± 2.8% 52% 48% -
Public Opinion Strategies October 14–15, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 51% 44%
We Ask America October 9, 2012 1183 ± 2.9% 46% 46% 8%
Anzalone Liszt Research October 2–4, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 44% 45% 11%
GBA Strategies September 24–26, 2012 600 ± 4.0% 47% 45%
Public Opinion Strategies August 8–9, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 50% 37% 13%
Public Opinion Strategies May 2012 400 ± 4.9% 51% 35% 14%
Public Opinion Strategies February 2012 44% 35% 21%

Results

Illinois' 17th congressional district election results, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cheri Bustos 153,519 53.3
Republican Bobby Schilling (incumbent) 134,623 46.7
Independent Eric Reyes (write-in) 10 0.0
Independent Joe Faber (write-in) 9 0.0
Total votes 288,161 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 18

Republican Aaron Schock, who had represented the 18th district since 2009, ran for and won re-election. The district was one of two which were expected to remain strongly favorable to Republicans.[26] Peoria's more Democratic southern portion was shifted to the 17th District, and was replaced by the heavily Republican Bloomington-Normal and Quincy areas.[85]

Republican primary

Darrel Miller, a farmer, had planned to challenge Schock in the Republican primary,[92] but was removed from the ballot by the Illinois Board of Elections in February 2012.[93]

Primary results

Republican primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Aaron Schock (incumbent) 87,441 100.0
Total votes 87,441 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Primary results

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steve Waterworth 10,211 69.6
Democratic Matthew Woodmancy 4,465 30.4
Total votes 14,676 100.0

General election

Results

Illinois' 18th congressional district, 2012[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Aaron Schock (incumbent) 244,467 74.2
Democratic Steve Waterworth 85,164 25.8
Total votes 329,631 100.0
Republican hold

References

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External links

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