To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2011 South Bend, Indiana mayoral election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2011 South Bend mayoral election
← 2007 November 8, 2011 2015 →
Turnout20.29%
 
PeteButtigieg (1).JPG
3x4.svg
3x4.svg
Nominee Pete Buttigieg Norris W. Curry, Jr Patrick M. Farrell
Party Democratic Republican Libertarian
Popular vote 10,991 2,884 1,008
Percentage 73.85% 19.38% 6.77%

Mayor before election

Steve Luecke
Democratic

Elected Mayor

Pete Buttigieg
Democratic

The 2011 South Bend, Indiana mayoral election was held on November 8, 2011.[1][2]

After serving for fourteen years, incumbent mayor Steve Luecke announced that he would not seek reelection. Luecke's decision not to run for reelection made the 2011 election the first open election for mayor of South Bend in 24 years.

The election was won by Pete Buttigieg, who, at 29 years of age, became the youngest mayor, at the time, of a United States city with a population greater than 100,000.

The election coincided with races for the Common Council and for South Bend City Clerk.

Background

After serving for fourteen years, incumbent mayor Steve Luecke announced that he would not seek reelection.[3] Luecke's decision not to run for reelection made the 2011 election the first open election for mayor of South Bend in 24 years.[4][5][6] His decision not to seek reelection was considered a surprise, and initiated a large rush of candidates declaring they that they would seek to succeed him as mayor.[7]

South Bend was regarded to be a Democratic-leaning city.[3][8][9][10][11][12] A Republican had not been elected mayor of the city in the four decades,[6][13] since Lloyd Allen won his second term in 1967.[11][12][14][15]

The election coincided with races for the Common Council and for South Bend City Clerk.[16]

Nominations

Primaries were held for the Democratic and Republican parties on May 3.[17][18]

During the primaries, St. Joseph County, where South Bend is located, saw voter turnout of 16% in its various primary elections.[19] This was an increase of 6% from the primaries four years prior.[19]

Absentee voting ballots in the South Bend primaries numbered at 2,539.[20]

Democratic primary

Democratic candidates included failed 2010 Indiana State treasurer candidate Pete Buttigieg, state representative Ryan Dvorak, high school teacher and St. Joseph Councilman Michael Hamann, reverend and former Clinton administration staffer Barrett Berry, and attorney Felipe Merino.[21][22][23][24][13] Individuals who had previously been running, but were not included on the ballot because they either dropped-out or were disqualified from running, included Mark Dollinger, a business services representative at Work One (Indiana's workforce development agency) and the former manager of the city's Weed and Seed program.[22][25]

Incumbent mayor Stephen Luecke abstained from endorsing any candidate ahead of the primary.[26]

Dvorak was initially seen as having some potential advantages, such as media coverage of the state legislature and the fact that his father was the county prosecutor.[21] Dvorak had never before lost an election campaign.[27] Due to his strong name recognition, Dvorak was initially regarded as the frontrunner.[28] During the campaign, Dvorak was involved in the Indiana legislative walkouts, which caused him to spend a significant part of his candidacy out-of-town in Illinois.[29][30][31][32] Dvorak had strong labor support, which he helped shore up by participating in the Indiana legislative walkouts.[28]

Buttigieg had entered the race with very little name recognition.[33] As a candidate, Buttigieg outlined a platform for his prospective mayoralty.[34] This included an economic plan which promised to assist responsible existing employers grow, cultivate "new homegrown businesses of tomorrow", have the city compete both nationally and globally for investments, create "well-coordinated and user-friendly" economic development, confront poverty, and make investments in human capital and quality of life.[35] He outlined an action plan for these economic priorities in April.[36] Buttigieg also declared, “This election is about jobs, and the top priority of the next mayor has to be on putting people to work in good jobs. I have the most experience when it comes to business and economics. I’m the only candidate who has been involved in multibillion dollar decisions in the private sector, with some of the world’s top firms.”[37] Buttigieg's campaign manager, Mike Schmuhl, had previously been the campaign manager on Joe Donnelly's 2010 congressional campaign.[38][39][40] Buttigieg was ultimately supported by former mayors Roger Parent and Joe E. Kernan (the latter also being a former governor).[41][42] Additionally, in its first-ever mayoral endorsement, the Chamber of Commerce of St. Joseph County endorsed Buttigieg's candidacy.[37] Buttigieg was also endorsed by the South Bend Tribune[33] in its first-ever mayoral primary endorsement[28] and the South Bend's chapter of the International Association of Fire Fighters.[38][43]

Barrett Berry, a local pastor, was well known for hosting a radio program.[7] Berry had returned to South Bend three years prior after an extended career working in federal government which not only included roles in the Clinton administration, but also had included an assignment as a control officer for the United States Department of State in Nairobi after the 1998 United States embassy bombings.[7] Barrett served on several local boards, including the St. Joseph County Area Planning Commission, to which he had been appointed by mayor Luecke.[7]

Michael Hamann promoted himself as, "the only candidate with proven executive experience".[7] Hamann had been a St. Joseph County Commissioner from 1999 through 2003, and was now a St. Joseph County Councilman representing a district which covered northwest South Bend and northwest St. Joseph County.[7] He had also been a teacher for 26 years, and was also running a communications and marketing firm.[7] Calling the city's unemployment rate, "unacceptably high", Hamann pledged to attract well-paying employers to the city.[7] Hamann also pledged that, if elected, he would aggressively demolish abandoned neighborhoods in order to generate neighborhood revitalization and in order to combat crime.[7] While St. Joseph County Democratic Chairman Butch Morgan refrained from formally endorsing any candidate,[21] he privately supported Hamann.[44] Hamann also received the endorsement of Citizens for Community Values Indiana.[18]

Felipe Merino, an attorney, stated he was running because, "we need businesses, we need investment, we need somebody to take care of graffiti, somebody to fill our potholes, we need somebody who is going to make sure that the west side and the east side of South Bend are both being taken care of."[13] He dropped out of the race in March, citing unspecified "personal issues".[7] However, by state law, his name would remain on the ballot.[7] After dropping-out, he endorsed Dvorak.[45]

Buttigieg out-fundraised the other candidates.[46][47] Buttigieg began to lead the pack in fundraising as early as January 2011.[25][48] By April 8, Buttigieg had raised $230,000 for his campaign.[41][49] Dvorak had raised $100,000.[41][49] Hamann had raised $56,000.[41][49]

Had they been successful in their efforts to be elected mayor, either Berry (who is African American)[50] or Merino (who is hispanic)[51] would have been the first ethnic minority to be elected to a full-time executive office in St. Joseph County. No ethnic minority would be elected to a full-time executive office in St. Joseph County until the 2015 South Bend City Clerk election was won by Kareemah Fowler.[52]

In February the race was described as being "wide open", with polls showing that 60% of voters had not even yet learned that Luecke was retiring.[21]

In mid-March, a poll conducted by the Feldman Group found Buttigieg and Dvorak to be in a virtual tie, both garnering roughly 30%. Roughly a quarter of voters were undecided.[31] The race had widely come to be seen as being primarily a contest between Buttigieg and Dvorak.[33]

On April 9 a debate was held at Indiana University South Bend, sponsored by Indiana University South Bend's American Democracy Project and Political Science Club as well as the League of Women Voters of the South Bend Area.[53]

By mid-April, the election was still regarded to be a close-race between Buttigieg and Dvorak, with Hamann being seen as a third-place candidate trying to push his way back towards contention.[28]

Late in the race, Dvorak swiftly turned negative in campaigning against Buttigieg, a move which backfired.[33][38][54][55] Additionally, Hamann garnered sympathy after the tragic death of his wife,[54] which occurred in mid-April.[56] These two factors compounded, and Dvorak fell to third place.[33][54]

Polls

In mid-March, a poll conducted by the Feldman Group found Buttigieg and Dvorak to be in a virtual tie, both garnering roughly 30%. Roughly a quarter of voters were undecided.[31]

By mid-April, the election was regarded to be a close-race between Buttigieg and Dvorak, with Hamann being seen as a third-place candidate trying to push his way back towards contention.[28] Additionally, by April two internal polls showed Buttigieg with leads of 2 and 14 percent.[42] State representative Craig Fry reported having seen internal polling which even showed Dvorak with a lead.[28] Both Buttigieg and Dvorak had each announced that they had internal polls showing themselves to be in the lead.[55]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Barrett
Berry
Pete
Buttigieg
Ryan
Dvorak
Michael
Hamann
Feldman Group[31] Mid-march 400 ± 5% 4% 32% 30% 12%

Result

Buttigieg ultimately won what was considered a surprisingly strong victory in the primary.[14][17][46] Due to the contest featuring four serious contenders for the nomination, experts had predicted that the victor would only carry roughly a third of the vote.[14][33]

Buttigieg benefited from large crossover voting in support of him,[12][14][15][46] with one analysis finding that he received the votes of up to 3,000 Republicans.[14][33][15][46]

Voter turnout in the primary was much greater than had been predicted.[33] This was largely due to Republican crossover voting.[33] Some predictions for turnout were as low as 8,000.[33][47] The median prediction had roughly been 11,000.[33]

Democratic primary results[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Buttigieg 7,663 54.90
Democratic Michael J. Hamann 2,798 20.05
Democratic Ryan Dvorak 2,041 14.62
Democratic Barrett Berry 1,424 10.20
Democratic Felipe N. Merino 32 0.23
Total votes 13,958 100

Republican primary

By April, Norris W. Curry, also known as Wayne Curry,[12] had already established himself as the broad frontrunner in the Republican primary.[31][58] Curry, a building contractor, had won the support of the local Republican establishment ahead of the primary.[38] Curry also was considered the best-known individual among those contending for the Republican nomination, and was also the most visible campaigner.[7] Curry had previously run unsuccessfully for an at-large city council seat in 2007, as well as a county council seat in 2008.[7] Curry had some experience in government and community projects, including having served as chairman for the Economic Development Panel of South Bend's City Plan process from 2003 through 2006.[7] He had also served as treasurer for both the Community Oriented Policing Leadership Council and the North East Neighborhood Council.[7] Curry's initial plans for 2011 were to run for the 4th district seat on the South Bend City Council, but he ultimately changed his mind and ran for mayor instead.[7] Curry stated that he considered the "biggest asset" of the city to be its residents.[7] Curry hoped to be the nominee so that he could present an alternative to Democratic rule in the city, which he critiqued for having what he considered a "grossly" flawed "direction and philosophy for which they base their decisions on".[7] He claimed declining population, business, and jobs in the city were evidence of failed Democratic leadership, and declared that he would reverse these trends if elected.[7]

Also running in the Republican primary was William F. "Bill" Davis, a self-proclaimed "independent" who had challenged mayor Luecke for the Democratic nomination in the previous election.[7][13] He had also run for other offices in the past, with his most recent campaign having been a 2008 St. Joseph County Commissioner's election in which he had received 40% of the vote.[7] Davis was described by local reporter Ralph Heibutzki as the "least conventional" candidate in either party's primary.[7] He received media attention for his troublesome history, which included periods in which he had stayed in prisons and in mental hospitals.[7] Davis argued that his history was less relevant than the platform on which he was running.[7] His platform was focused on revitalizing neighborhoods, which he argued was critical to improving the economic fortunes of the city.[7] He declared that, as mayor, he would have made it less difficult to purchase vacant houses for public use.[7]

Additionally running was Wilson R. Taylor II, also known as Will Taylor.[7][13] Like the other Republican candidates, Taylor also made vacant properties a focal point of his candidacy.[7] Taylor's career was as a real estate investor who flipped properties.[7] He declared that the city had been too aggressive in demolishing vacant homes.[7] At the time of the campaign, he was even suing the city's code enforcement department for not permitting him to repair a condemned property.[7] Taylor promised to make overhauling the code enforcement department a priority.[7] He declared that he would not change most other city departments, as he believed them to be efficiently functioning.[7] Taylor also promised to make anti-drug efforts a priority.[7]

Result

The turnout in the Republican primary was, at the time, the lowest Republican primary turnout in modern South Bend mayoral election history.[15]

Republican primary results[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Norris W. Curry, Jr. 655 65.83
Republican William F. Davis 248 24.93
Republican Wilson R. Taylor II 92 9.25
Total votes 995 100

General election

During the race, Buttigieg was seen as the heavy favorite to win.[8][11][39][59][60][61] While the Democratic nomination was roughly considered to be tantamount to election,[33][46][62] making the general election largely pro forma, Buttigieg refused to take a victory for granted declaring that, “The political graveyard is filled with people who took it for granted".[46]

During his primary campaign, Buttigieg had spent nearly all of the funds he had raised, subsequently justifying this by declaring, "We didn’t want to lose a squeaker and have a lot left in the tank."[46] He continued to raise additional funds in the general election.[46]

Buttigieg stated that his top economic priority for South Bend was customer service, arguing that it was important for the city to provide a more efficient response to local businesses and businesses seeking to locate in the city. He believed that this could be accomplished by establishing a single point of contact for business services that would be tasked with communicating efficiently with businesses.[63] He stated that a top priority for him as mayor would be partnering with the board and superintendent of the South Bend Community School Corporation to improve collaboration between the city government and the schools.[64]

Curry issued a 13-point plan for economic development.[65] Curry also had plans for neighborhoods, education/children, and crime reduction.[66] Curry continued discussing plans to address abandoned properties.[67]

Joining both Curry and Buttigieg in the general election was Libertarian Party nominee Patrick M. Farrell.[59]

In the midst of the campaign, Buttigieg spent two weeks away from the campaign trail because he was called to service in San Diego as part of his duties in the United States Navy Reserve.[46]

Buttigieg sought to run a general election campaign that was unified with the campaigns of candidates running in the coinciding council elections.[46]

A debate was held between the three candidates at Indiana University South Bend on October 27. The debate was sponsored by Indiana University South Bend's American Democracy Project and Political Science Club as well as the League of Women Voters of the South Bend Area.[68][69]

Result

Turnout in the general election was 20.29%.[70][71]

Buttigieg won all of the city's 91 voting precincts.[14][72] These included several heavily Republican precincts in the city's 5th district.[14][72] Some of western South Bend's heavily African American precincts gave Buttigieg some of his greatest levels of support in the general election.[23]

The election made Buttigieg, sworn-in at 29 years of age, the youngest mayor, at the time, of a United States city with a population greater than 100,000.[2][29][73][74][75][76][77] Buttigieg also became the second-youngest mayor in South Bend history, after Schuyler Colfax III, who was elected mayor at age 28 in 1898.[46][72][78]

General election results[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Buttigieg 10,991 73.85
Republican Norris W. Curry Jr. 2,884 19.38
Libertarian Patrick M. Farrell 1,008 6.77
Total votes 14,883 100

See also

References

  1. ^ Adams, Samuel (November 3, 2011). "2011 South Bend, Indiana Election". Benton Spirit News. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Shoemaker, Thomas (January 13, 2015). "MAYORS ON THE RISE: PETE BUTTIGIEG". Nation Swell. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  3. ^ a b Galer, Sarah (May 4, 2011). "Ex-Indiana treasurer candidate wins South Bend mayoral primary". WTHR. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  4. ^ Fuller, Jaime (March 10, 2014). "The most interesting mayor you've never heard of". Washington Post. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  5. ^ Molina, Rich (March 23, 2011). "Meet the Candidates: Pete Buttigieg". WNDU-TV.
  6. ^ a b Howey, Brian A. (November 10, 2011). "Big GOP gains shift to city halls" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 17 (13). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah Heibutzki, Ralph (April 28, 2011). "Crowded Ballot For SB Mayor's Spot: Race Features Five Democrats, Three Republicans" (PDF). Benton Spirit News. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  8. ^ a b Howey, Brian A. (June 2, 2011). "9 mayoral races in 'Tossup' zone" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (37). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  9. ^ Larsen, Jonathan (April 9, 2019). "Buttigieg's 2011 Campaign-Finance Records Were Destroyed". The Young Turks. Retrieved September 10, 2019.
  10. ^ "Candidates in mayoral races in Indiana cities". The Herald Bulletin. Associated Press. November 6, 2011. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  11. ^ a b c Coyne, Tom (November 8, 2011). "Muncie picks 1st Democratic mayor in 20 years". Real Clear Politics. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  12. ^ a b c d Doyle, Megan (November 7, 2011). "Candidates compete in city's mayoral race". The Observer. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  13. ^ a b c d e Lewis, Brandon (February 18, 2011). "Four more declare candidacy for South Bend mayoral race". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Cowell, Jack (December 4, 2014). "Jack Colwell: Sizing up South Bend, Mishawaka mayoral races". Howey Politics. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  15. ^ a b c d Jack, Colwell (September 1, 2011). "2 cities, 2 mayor trends" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 17 (4). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  16. ^ "2011 South Bend, Indiana Election". Benton-Michiana Spirit. November 3, 2011. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  17. ^ a b Parrott, Jeff (May 3, 2011). "Buttigieg to face Curry for South Bend mayor's seat". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved April 10, 2019.
  18. ^ a b "Citizens for Community Values of Indiana PAC May 3, 2011 -- South Bend City Primary Election Profamily Candidate Endorsements Should Homosexual Activists take over South Bend?" (PDF). Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  19. ^ a b Parrott, Jeff (May 6, 2015). "Pete Buttigieg rolls to victory in South Bend mayoral primary". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  20. ^ Peterson, Mark (May 6, 2019). "Voters finally show interest in South Bend primary election". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  21. ^ a b c d Howey, Brian A. (February 24, 2011). "First look at Indiana mayoral races" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (25). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  22. ^ a b Parrott, Jeff. "Buttigieg Takes Early Lead Filling Campaign Coffers". South Bend Tribune.
  23. ^ a b Doherty, Tucker (July 8, 2019). "Pete Buttigieg lost black support between 2 mayoral runs, data shows". Politico. Retrieved July 21, 2019.
  24. ^ "South Bend mayor candidate quits" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (26). March 3, 2011. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  25. ^ a b Peterson, Mark (January 21, 2011). "South Bend mayor's race already heating up". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  26. ^ Galer, Sara (May 4, 2011). "Ex-Indiana treasurer candidate wins South Bend mayoral primary". WTHR. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  27. ^ Peterson, Mark. "Ryan Dvorak loses for the 1st time". WNDU-TV.
  28. ^ a b c d e f Howey, Brian A. (April 14, 2011). "Lugar opens big money lead over Mourdock" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (31). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  29. ^ a b Wren, Adam (December 16, 2018). "Pete Buttigieg Has His Eye On The Prize". Indianapolis Magazine. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  30. ^ Howey, Brian A. (March 3, 2011). "House walkout could impact mayoral races" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (26). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  31. ^ a b c d e Jack, Colwell (April 7, 2011). "Poll shows Dvorak, Buttigieg in dead heat" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (30). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  32. ^ Peterson, Mark (March 9, 2011). "Rep. Dvorak "snuck back home" from Illinois". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Colwell, Jack (May 12, 2011). "Buttigieg essentially is mayor elect" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (35). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  34. ^ "Issues". Pete for South Bend. Archived from the original on September 3, 2011.
  35. ^ "South Bend's New Economic Direction". Pete for South Bend. Archived from the original on September 10, 2011.
  36. ^ "BUTTIGIEG ANNOUNCES ACTION PLAN FOR JOB CREATION". Pete for South Bend. April 14, 2011. Archived from the original on April 23, 2011.
  37. ^ a b Howey, Brian A. (April 7, 2011). "Gregg inches closer to candidacy after Lake, Southern J-J swing" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (30). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  38. ^ a b c d Colwell, Jack (May 5, 2011). "Buttigieg wins an impressive primary" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (34). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  39. ^ a b Colwell, Jack (October 27, 2011). "Butch Morgan says 'I had no clue'" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 17 (11). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  40. ^ "Schmuhl elected as Second District chairman". The Michigan City News Dispatch. November 15, 2011. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  41. ^ a b c d McGurk, Nick (April 17, 2011). "Buttigieg raises nearly a quarter of a million dollars in mayor's race". WNDU. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  42. ^ a b Howey, Brian A. (April 28, 2011). "New faces await Indiana Dems as the guard changes" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (33). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  43. ^ "MAYOR BUTTIGIEG'S CAMPAIGN ANNOUNCES LIST OF ENDORSEMENTS". Pete for South Bend. Archived from the original on August 24, 2016.
  44. ^ Lange, Kaitlin (February 12, 2019). "What Mayor Pete Buttigieg thinks about Mike Pence and 7 other takeaways from his new book". Indianapolis Star. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  45. ^ "MAYORAL CANDIDATE FELIPE MERINO ENDORSES RYAN DVORAK FOR MAYOR | Ryan Dvorak for Mayor - South Bend, Indiana". www.ryandvorak.com. Dvorak for Mayor. April 26, 2011. Archived from the original on March 23, 2012. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  46. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Jack, Colwell (August 25, 2011). "How to campaign for an office you've already won" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 17 (3). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  47. ^ a b Peterson, Mark (April 20, 2011). "Candidate for SB mayor raises $229,000". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  48. ^ Molina, Rich (January 22, 2011). "Democrat Pete Buttigieg has the most fundraising money so far". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  49. ^ a b c "Chocola urges Lugar to retire" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (32). April 21, 2011. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  50. ^ "About Us". 100 Black Men of South Bend. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  51. ^ Blasko, Erin (June 6, 2018). "Congressional candidates: Trump comments are 'unconscionable,' 'inappropriate". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  52. ^ Swiercz, Greg (July 16, 2019). "South Bend City Clerk Kareemah Fowler to become chief financial officer for South Bend schools". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  53. ^ Dan, O'Bryant (March 16, 2011). "Mayoral Debate – April 9". Indiana University South Bend. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  54. ^ a b c Howey, Brian A. (May 5, 2011). "Davis, Buttigieg and Freeman-Wilson emerge in mayoral races while only a few primary upsets" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 16 (34). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  55. ^ a b Parrott, Jeff (April 28, 2011). "Dvorak ad attacks Buttigieg's experience, contributions Buttigieg says he would be his own man if elected". South Bend Tribune.
  56. ^ Lewis, Kevin; Lewis, Brandon (April 25, 2011). "Mayoral candidate Mike Hamann to stay in race". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  57. ^ a b c "Historical Election Results". Indiana.gov Voter Portal. Retrieved April 10, 2019.
  58. ^ Colwell, Jack (April 5, 2011). "Jack Colwell: Poll shows Dvorak, Buttigieg dogfight". howeypolitics.com. Howey Politics. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  59. ^ a b Doyle, Megan (November 9, 2011). "Mayoral winner promises change" (PDF). The Observer. 45 (50): 1. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  60. ^ Howey, Brian A. (October 20, 2011). "Behind the Scenes at Butch Resigns" (PDF). Politics Indiana. 17 (10). Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  61. ^ Howey, Brian A. (November 3, 2011). "Potential mayoral race story lines" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 17 (12). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  62. ^ Howey, Brian (June 11, 2011). "Incumbent mayors eye dicey election season". The Michigan City News Dispatch. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  63. ^ Adams, Samuel (November 3, 2011). "2011 South Bend, Indiana Election". Benton-Michiana Spirit News. Retrieved September 7, 2019.
  64. ^ Adams, Samuel (November 3, 2011). "2011 South Bend, Indiana Election". bentonspiritnews.com. Benton Spirit News. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  65. ^ "Wayne Curry's 13 Pt. Plan for Economic Development". waynecurry4mayor.com. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  66. ^ "Wayne Curry for Mayor". waynecurry4mayor.com. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  67. ^ Molina, Rich (May 4, 2011). "Buttigieg and Curry talk about their plans if elected mayor of South Bend". www.wndu.com. WNDU-TV. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  68. ^ Jones, Dorlita (October 25, 2011). "Mayoral Candidate Debate – Oct. 27". Indiana University South Bend. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  69. ^ Jones, Dorlita (September 15, 2011). "Three Debates Planned". Indiana University South Bend. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  70. ^ Aldag, Austin. "The Local American Voter: Mayoral Election Turnout in Midsized American Cities". Illinois Wesleyan University. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  71. ^ "2011 General Election Results". Indiana Secretary of State. Archived from the original on August 8, 2018. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  72. ^ a b c Colwell, Jack (November 17, 2011). "Rep. Fry was hit by a freight train" (PDF). Howey Politics Indiana. 17 (14). Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  73. ^ Abigail, Hess (March 22, 2019). "Meet 37-year-old Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg, who thinks he can become the youngest US president ever". CNBC. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  74. ^ Pittman, Travis (January 23, 2019). "Who is Pete Buttigieg?". KGW. Associated Press. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  75. ^ "Presidential Candidates". National Education Association. Retrieved September 9, 2019.
  76. ^ Parrott, Jeff (December 18, 2018). "Pete Buttigieg will not seek a third term as South Bend mayor". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  77. ^ "IN Focus: South Bend mayor takes first step toward run for President". Fox 59. WSBT-TV. Associated Press. January 27, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  78. ^ Sloma, Tricia (November 9, 2011). "Pete Buttigieg becomes second youngest mayor in South Bend". WNDU-TV. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
This page was last edited on 9 January 2021, at 01:23
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.