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2009 Lenox Industrial Tools 301

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2009 Lenox Industrial Tools 301
Race details[1][2][3]
Race 17 of 36 in the 2009 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
Layout of New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Layout of New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Date June 28, 2009 (2009-June-28)
Official name Lenox Industrial Tools 301
Location New Hampshire Motor Speedway, Loudon, New Hampshire
Course Permanent racing facility
1.058 mi (1.703 km)
Distance 273 laps, 288.834 mi (464.833 km)
Scheduled Distance 301 laps, 318.458 mi (512.508 km)
Weather Temperatures up to 82 °F (28 °C); wind speeds up to 9.9 miles per hour (15.9 km/h)[4]
Average speed 97.497 miles per hour (156.906 km/h)
Pole position
Driver Stewart-Haas Racing
Time N/A
Most laps led
Driver Jimmie Johnson Hendrick Motorsports
Laps 93
Winner
No. 20 Joey Logano Joe Gibbs Racing
Television in the United States
Network Turner Network Television
Announcers Ralph Sheheen,[5] Wally Dallenbach Jr., Kyle Petty
Nielsen Ratings
  • 4.1 (Final)
  • 3.5/9 (Overnight)
  • (5,555,000 million)[6]

The 2009 Lenox Industrial Tools 301 was the 17th stock car race of the 2009 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. It was held on June 28, 2009, in Loudon, New Hampshire, at New Hampshire Motor Speedway, before a crowd of 101,000 people. The rain-shortened 273-lap race was won by Joe Gibbs Racing driver Joey Logano after he started from the 24th position. Jeff Gordon of Hendrick Motorsports was second, and Penske Championship Racing's Kurt Busch took third.

Tony Stewart was awarded the pole position after qualifying was rained out and the starting order was determined by owners' points. He was immediately passed by Gordon at the start of the race. Busch took the first position on lap seven, before Gordon retook it on the 20th lap. Gordon lost the lead to Busch eleven laps later. Jimmie Johnson assumed the lead on lap 50, and maintained it for the following 73 laps. He led another 20 laps for a total 93 led, more than any other driver. His teammate Gordon re-assumed the lead following a caution period and maintained it until Stewart passed him on lap 196. Ryan Newman became the leader on lap 247 and Logano took over first place when Newman made a pit stop for fuel. The race ended early due to rain on the 273rd lap and Logano was declared the winner. There were eight cautions and 21 lead changes amongst 14 drivers during the event.

It was Logano's first victory in the Sprint Cup Series; at the age of 19 years, 1 month and 4 days, he became the youngest driver in series history to win a race. After the race, Stewart's advantage over Gordon in the Drivers' Championship was reduced from 84 to 69 points. Johnson, Busch and Edwards rounded out the top five. Chevrolet maintained the Manufacturers' Championship lead with 126 points, 32 ahead of their nearest rivals Toyota, 46 in front of Ford, and 56 ahead of Dodge with nineteen races remaining in the season. The race attracted 5,555,000 television viewers.

Report

Background

New Hampshire Motor Speedway, where the race was held.
New Hampshire Motor Speedway, where the race was held.

The 2009 Lenox Industrial Tools 301 was the 17th of 36 scheduled stock car races of the 2009 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. It was held on June 28, 2009, in Loudon, New Hampshire, at New Hampshire Motor Speedway,[2] one of ten intermediate tracks to hold NASCAR races, the others are Atlanta Motor Speedway, Charlotte Motor Speedway, Chicagoland Speedway, and Darlington Raceway as well as Homestead–Miami Speedway, Kansas Speedway, Kentucky Speedway, Las Vegas Motor Speedway, and Texas Motor Speedway.[7] The standard New Hampshire Motor Speedway layout is a four-turn 1.058 mi (1.703 km) oval track.[8] Its turns are banked at two to seven degrees; both the front stretch (the finish line) and the back stretch are banked at one degree.[8]

Before the race, Tony Stewart led the Drivers' Championship with 2,364 points, followed by Jeff Gordon on 2,280 points. Jimmie Johnson was third in the Drivers' Championship with 2,207 points, Dale Earnhardt Jr. was fourth on 2,084 points, and Carl Edwards stood in fifth on 2,051 points. Ryan Newman, Denny Hamlin, Greg Biffle, Kyle Busch, Matt Kenseth, Mark Martin, and Juan Pablo Montoya rounded out the top twelve drivers.[9] In the Manufacturers' Championship, Chevrolet were leading with 120 points, 35 points ahead of their rivals Toyota in second place. Ford, with 77 points, was eleven points in front of their rivals Dodge in the battle for the third position.[10] Kurt Busch was the race's defending champion.[11]

Ahead of the event, the organizers opened a new configuration of the track, which allowed the infield section to be expanded with 400% usable land made available. Safety changes increased the track's catch fences near the grandstands by 215 feet (50.4 in) with the installation of "Wheel fence" arch posts. The lower section was reinforced with six strands of 5/8-inch, high-strength cable, and the upper section had sixteen strands of 3/8-inch cable. Jerry Gappens, executive vice president and general manager of the track, affirmed the changes were not made in response to an airborne accident involving Edwards in the Aaron's 499 at Talladega Superspeedway, which injured seven spectators.[12]

One non-full-time driver attempted to qualify for the first time in the season. Ted Christopher, who had last started a Sprint Cup Series race since the 2006 Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire, attempted to qualify the No. 27 Kirk Shelmerdine Racing vehicle. He had previously driven for the team in three previous races at New Hampshire Motor Speedway. He said he was looking forward to racing the Car of Tomorrow for the first time in his career, "I went over to see him last weekend when I was [in North Carolina]. He said come over and try the seat in the car. It fit good and he called me on Monday and said they he had got a sponsor and wanted me to run his car. I'm looking forward to it. I think I've made the race for him every time we've tried to qualify at New Hampshire."[13]

Practice and qualifying

Three practice sessions were held before the Sunday race—one on Friday, and two on Saturday. The first session lasted 90 minutes, the second 50 minutes, and the final session 60 minutes.[3] During the first practice session, Kurt Busch was fastest with a 29.149 seconds lap, placing ahead of David Reutimann in second and Montoya in third. Johnson took fourth position, and Reed Sorenson placed fifth. Denny Hamlin, Martin Truex Jr., Kyle Busch, Clint Bowyer and Joey Logano rounded out the top ten fastest drivers in the session.[14] During the session, Stewart crashed into the wall at turn two, causing heavy damage to the rear of his car. He used a back-up car for the remainder of the race weekend. Martin made contact with a barrier between turns three and four, causing him to spin and suffered minor damage to his car.[3]

Tony Stewart (pictured in 2007) was awarded pole position after rain caused qualifying to be canceled.
Tony Stewart (pictured in 2007) was awarded pole position after rain caused qualifying to be canceled.

46 drivers entered the qualifier on Friday afternoon;[15] due to NASCAR's qualifying procedure, only 43 could race. Each driver was limited to two timed laps, with the starting order determined by the competitor's fastest times.[3] The session was canceled due to heavy rain, meaning that the starting order was set by owner points.[16] Stewart was awarded his first pole position of the season and his second at New Hampshire Motor Speedway. He was joined on the grid's front row by Gordon. Johnson qualified third, Kurt Busch was placed fourth and Edwards started from fifth place.[16] Ryan Newman, Hamlin, Biffle, Kyle Busch and Kenseth rounded out the top ten qualifiers.[17] The three drivers that failed to qualify were Dexter Bean, Christopher and Mike Wallace;[18] the latter announced that he would withdraw from the race, allowing Regan Smith to qualify.[19] Stewart said afterward that he felt his back-up car was "comparable" and "even to the first car" in his chances of achieving a high placed finish.[20]

On Saturday morning, Sorenson was quickest in the second practice session with a time of 29.647 seconds, ahead of Joe Nemechek in second place, and Casey Mears in third. Truex was fourth quickest, and Reutimann took fifth. Johnson, Montoya, Jeff Burton, Kurt Busch and Kevin Harvick followed in the top ten.[21] Later that day, Truex paced the final practice session with a lap time of 29.713 seconds, in front of Johnson in the second position, and Biffle in third. Sorenson was fourth fastest, ahead of Martin and Harvick. Montoya was seventh quickest, Kurt Busch eighth, Reutimann ninth and Bobby Labonte tenth ahead of the race on Sunday.[22]

Race

Live television coverage of the race began at 12:30 p.m. EDT in the United States on TNT.[3] Around the start of the race, weather conditions were cloudy with the air temperature at 68 °F (20 °C) and the track temperature at 89 °F (32 °C); a chance of rain showers was forecast.[23] Billy Mauldin, the President and CEO of Motor Racing Outreach began pre-race ceremonies by giving the invocation.[24] The 2009 Miss New Hampshire Lindsey Graham performed the United States National Anthem with Denise Doucette singing the National Anthem of Canada, and the winner of a sponsored sweepstakes competition Pete Dingeman commanded the drivers to start their engines.[25] NASCAR announced that a competition caution would take place on lap 35 due to the forecasted rain, requiring drivers to undertake mandatory pit stops to analyse tire wear.[26] No driver fell to the rear of the field during the pace laps.[27]

Jeff Gordon led early on and finished the race in the second position.
Jeff Gordon led early on and finished the race in the second position.

The race began at 2:16 p.m. local time. Jeff Gordon accelerated faster than Stewart off the line, getting ahead of him to the right at the first turn. Stewart lost two further places when Kurt Busch and Newman passed him further on in the lap. On the second lap, Kurt Busch began challenging Jeff Gordon for the first position, as Biffle clinched fifth place from Stewart. Johnson and Edwards managed to get ahead of Stewart for the sixth and seventh positions at the end of lap three. Biffle took the third position from Newman at the start of lap four, as Kurt Busch continued his attempts to get ahead of Gordon by taking the inside line. Kyle Busch fell to tenth when Kenseth and Montoya passed him on the sixth lap. Kurt Busch got ahead of Jeff Gordon at the entry of the first turn to take the lead on lap seven. Biffle managed to pass Jeff Gordon for second place one lap later. After starting the race in seventh, Hamlin fell to fourteenth by lap eleven. On lap 16, Patrick Carpentier ran deep because of a broken brake line, and he scraped the right-hand side wall at turn four, causing the event's first caution. Some of the drivers elected to make pit stops for tires under caution.[24][26][27]

The race restarted on lap 20, with Jeff Gordon passing Kurt Busch on the outside lane at the fourth turn to retake the lead. On the 21st lap, the second caution was waved; Jamie McMurray was hit from behind by Harvick, sending him into the turn four barrier after losing traction in his car. McMurray made heavy contact with the wall with his vehicle's rear. Under caution, some drivers again chose to make pit stops. Jeff Gordon maintained the lead at the lap 26 restart. A third caution came out on the following lap, as A. J. Allmendinger spun in turn two, and avoided a wall beside the track; Allmendinger had difficulty restarting his engine. This prompted NASCAR to move the competition caution to lap 45, as some drivers again elected to make pit stops under caution. Racing resumed on lap 32, with Kurt Busch getting ahead of Jeff Gordon on the right to regain the lead. As the top five formed a single line and pulled away from the rest of the field, on lap 41, Reutimann overtook Newman for eighth place. Newman lost the ninth position to Martin who was to his left two laps later. On lap 44, Stewart passed Truex for 14th.[24][26][27]

The competition caution was waved on the 45th lap. After the pit stops, Jeff Gordon returned to the first position for the lap 50 restart. Johnson got ahead of his teammate Jeff Gordon for the lead on the lap. Biffle made contact with the barrier at the right of turn four on lap 54; no caution was prompted. Two laps later, Kurt Busch passed Martin to move into fourth. On the 60th lap, Elliott Sadler lost control of his car in the second turn, sliding him into the side of Scott Speed's vehicle. That sent Speed into Michael Waltrip, and Robby Gordon spun to avoid the crash, necessitating the fifth caution. During the caution, sixteen drivers elected to make pit stops. Johnson led the field at the restart on lap 64 restart, followed by his teammate Jeff Gordon and Kyle Busch. On the next lap, Stewart got ahead of Martin and Kurt Busch on the right to advance into fourth. Jeff Gordon overtook Kyle Busch to move into second place on lap 66, and Stewart then passed the latter for third. On lap 72, Kenseth moved past Bowyer for the tenth position. Edwards turned left to pass Kenseth for fourteenth 21 laps later. By the 100th lap, Johnson's lead of 2.1 seconds was reduced to half a second over his teammate Jeff Gordon because of slower traffic.[24][26][27]

Jimmie Johnson led a race-high 93 laps. A loose car meant he finished in ninth place.
Jimmie Johnson led a race-high 93 laps. A loose car meant he finished in ninth place.

Fourteen laps later, Truex lost twelfth place to Montoya. Green flag pit stops began on the 119th lap. Johnson made his pit stop four laps later, handing the lead to Montoya, who held it for seven laps until his own stop. Sorenson, Robby Gordon each staggered their pit stops, leading one lap each. After the pit stops, Johnson regained the lead. Between laps 145 and 148, Kyle Busch was passed by Martin and Burton on the inside for seventh and eighth. In the meantime, sprinkles of rain were reported in the area; it did not affect the race. On lap 151, a sixth caution came out because officials located debris in turn two. Several drivers (including Johnson) made pit stops for tires during the caution. Johnson stalled in his pit box and fell to third. His teammate Jeff Gordon led at the lap 159 restart. Leaving the second turn, Jeff Gordon, Kurt Busch, and Johnson ran three abreast; Gordon kept the lead. Two laps later, Earnhardt used side-by-side contact between Jeff Gordon and Kurt Busch to get ahead of Stewart and Johnson on the right for third. Rain was again reported during the 162nd lap; NASCAR officials deemed the track safe.[24][26][27]

On lap 165, Johnson got loose on the exit to turn four and avoided hitting a wall. Johnson's driver error allowed Stewart and Truex to demote him to sixth place. Five laps later, Paul Menard locked his left-front tire, and he crashed into the turn four wall, prompting the seventh caution. Some drivers made pit stops during the caution. Racing resumed on lap 175 as Jeff Gordon maintained the lead. On the lap, a multi-car accident triggered the eighth caution and then a 16-minute red flag for track clearing. After Earnhardt spun his tires, Truex was hit from behind by an unsighted Kyle Busch into turn one, collecting Burton, Mears, Reutimann, Brian Vickers, David Ragan and McMurray. None of the leaders made pit stops when driving resumed. On lap 181, the race resumed with Jeff Gordon leading Kurt Busch and Stewart. Newman continued after he made heavy contact with a wall a lap later.[24][26][27] On the 183rd lap, Logano's left rear tire burst from contact with Newman and Reutimann between turns three and four;[2][28] its carcass tore through his car's sheet metal, and he spun near the pit road entrance, causing the ninth caution as debris was lying on the track.[24][26] Logano was sent to the end of the longest line for entering pit road when it was closed and for speeding in it.[28]

Joey Logano (pictured in 2015) took his first career victory and became the youngest driver to win a Sprint Cup Series race.
Joey Logano (pictured in 2015) took his first career victory and became the youngest driver to win a Sprint Cup Series race.

Jeff Gordon maintained the lead at the lap 188 restart. Two laps later, Speed collided heavily with a wall between turns one and two, prompting the tenth caution. The leaders remained on the circuit during the caution. Jeff Gordon held the first position from Stewart into turn one at the 196th lap restart. Stewart overtook Jeff Gordon at turn two to assume the lead. Earnhardt moved in front of Kahne for eighth on lap 203. Eight laps later, Johnson took the eighth position from Earnhardt with a successful pass. Earnhardt lost a further position to Kahne on the 216th lap. By lap 218, Stewart's lead had eroded and Jeff Gordon was close behind. Stewart responded to increase his advantage to 1.1 seconds nine laps later. On lap 231, Martin lost seventh to Johnson. The leaders made their pit stops for car adjustments four laps later, handing the lead to Martin and later Biffle.[24][26][27] One of Stewart's crew members dropped a lug nut for the right-front wheel and Stewart lost the lead.[29] Labonte led laps 238 to 247 before making his own stop, promoting Newman to first place, who stayed out because his team believed rain would fall. On lap 259, Jeff Gordon got ahead of Reutimann to move into third. Five laps later, Newman was low on fuel, necessitating a pit stop.[24][26][27]

Logano took the lead after his crew chief Greg Zipadelli instructed him to remain on track as the driver was about to enter pit road for fuel.[30] As Logano was due to make his final pit stop on lap 278, and cede the lead to Jeff Gordon,[31] rain showers necessitated the eleventh (and final) caution on lap 268.[27] Pace car driver Brett Bodine reported that the rain was falling more heavily on the backstretch during the lap. Three laps later, a NASCAR official in turn two reported a saturated track as the rain stopped.[24] Logano momentarily switched off his engine several times to conserve fuel.[32] The race was stopped for a second time on lap 273 out of a scheduled 301.[31] All cars were ordered to park on pit road and jet dryers circulated the track to clear standing water.[33] At 5:42 p.m. local time, the race was ended because no track condition improvements were reported.[24] This gave Logano the victory, the first of his career.[33] At 19 years, one month, and four days, he was the youngest driver to win a Sprint Cup Series race, besting Kyle Busch's record at 20 years, four months, and two days in the 2005 Sony HD 500 at Auto Club Speedway.[33] Jeff Gordon finished second, Kurt Busch third, Reutimann fourth, and Stewart fifth. Brad Keselowski, Kyle Busch, Sam Hornish Jr., Johnson and Kahne completed the top ten.[2] There were 21 lead changes among 14 drivers during the course of the race. Johnson's 93 laps led was more than any other driver. Logano led once for a total of ten laps.[2]

Post-race

"Now ... you have to listen to people say how you lucked into the whole deal. In the end, I hope he enjoys it because a win is a win and I don't think any less of mine because it's a rain-shortened race, so he shouldn't (either)."

David Reutimann, on Logano's maiden victory being perceived as "a fluke".[34]

Logano appeared in Victory Lane to celebrate his first career victory in front of a crowd of 101,000 people;[30] the win earned him $276,201.[2] He said of becoming the first rookie driver to win in 71 races, "This is so special, I think your first win no matter where it is is huge. Obviously it's not the way you want to win your first race, in the rain, but 20 years down the road when you look in the record books, no one will know the difference. I'll take them any way I can."[30] Jeff Gordon spoke of his happiness that he could challenge for the victory, "I wasn't very good on the restarts and those guys there, the #2 [Busch] and the #14 [Stewart] and the #48 [Johnson] got me but I could ride right there with him. Then my pit crew, they did the job in the pits and they were phenomenal and got us out front."[29] Kurt Busch accepted the view that the rain restricted him to third, "Overall, last year, to drive into Victory Lane and do it in a rain-shortened race and today to have it where we were fast enough to win and not get the win, you know, that’s how this sport evens itself out. You have your good and your bad luck."[32]

The event was stopped early for rain for the second consecutive year, and the third time in the season after the Daytona 500 and the Coca-Cola 600 that a NASCAR race was shortened by inclement weather conditions.[35] Since NASCAR began implementing a television network contact in 2001, the start times to daytime races were moved to begin later in the day.[36] Kurt Busch argued having a consistent start time for daylight races would have potentially meant competitors completed all the scheduled laps of the New Hampshire round, "If we had a consistent time for our races, that would be better for our fans. That would create more viewership knowing that they knew when to find the race."[36] Ramsey R. Poston, managing director of communications and spokesperson for NASCAR, said the organization supported the suggestion of consistent starting times, and planned to discuss the topic with the sport's broadcasters.[36]

Kyle Busch apologized for causing the eight-car crash that stopped the race on lap 175,[35] "I got into Martin and I hate it for him and Jeff Burton and those guys. It was just hard racing on a restart. It looked like the 88 spun his tires a little bit. I went to the middle to go for a lane and these double-file restarts everything is so tight anyways and I just got into the 1 a little bit there and got him sideways."[37] Vickers argued that Kyle Busch should have been disqualified after he reviewed video footage of the accident in the infield care center, "That's the second week in a row that stupidity has cost us a race, and it's frustrating."[37] Truex concurred with Vickers and opined that Kyle Busch did not ease off the accelerator pedal, "Kyle just lost his head like he usually does when something bad happens. He decided he wasn't going to lift, he was going to turn me on the straightaway for no good reason at all."[37] Burton said he felt the accident was a consequence of NASCAR's rules on double-file restarts, "I don’t think the fans want to see more wrecks. But they want to see more aggressive racing so that is the product of that. You can’t change something without there being some kind of negative consequences and this is an example.”[38]

Stewart continued to the lead the Drivers' Championship with 2,524 points, as Jeff Gordon lowered his advantage to 69 points. Johnson maintained third with 2,355 points, Kurt Busch kept fourth with 2,254 points, and Edwards was fifth with 2,157 points. Hamlin advanced past Ryan Newman for seventh, and Kyle Busch outscored Biffle to take over eighth. Kenseth, Martin and Montoya rounded out the top twelve.[39] Chevrolet maintained its lead in the Manufacturers' Championship with 126 points. Toyota followed in second with 94 points. Ford (with 80 points) continued to lead Dodge in fourth (70 points).[10] The race had a television audience of 5,555,000 million;[6] it took two hours, 57 minutes, and 45 seconds to complete; because it concluded under caution, no margin of victory was recorded.[2]

Classification

Qualifying

Qualifying results
Grid No. Driver Team Manufacturer
1 14 Tony Stewart Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet
2 24 Jeff Gordon Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet
3 48 Jimmie Johnson Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet
4 2 Kurt Busch Penske Championship Racing Dodge
5 99 Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing Ford
6 39 Ryan Newman Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet
7 11 Denny Hamlin Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota
8 16 Greg Biffle Roush Fenway Racing Ford
9 18 Kyle Busch Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota
10 17 Matt Kenseth Roush Fenway Racing Ford
11 5 Mark Martin Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet
12 42 Juan Pablo Montoya Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet
13 9 Kasey Kahne Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge
14 00 David Reutimann Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota
15 31 Jeff Burton Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet
16 33 Clint Bowyer Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet
17 83 Brian Vickers Red Bull Racing Team Toyota
18 47 Marcos Ambrose JTG Daugherty Racing Toyota
19 26 Jamie McMurray Roush Fenway Racing Ford
20 88 Dale Earnhardt Jr. Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet
21 07 Casey Mears Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet
22 1 Martin Truex Jr. Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet
23 19 Elliott Sadler Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge
24 20 Joey Logano Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota
25 29 Kevin Harvick Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet
26 77 Sam Hornish Jr. Penske Championship Racing Dodge
27 43 Reed Sorenson Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge
28 96 Bobby Labonte Hall of Fame Racing Ford
29 55 Michael Waltrip Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota
30 44 A. J. Allmendinger Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge
31 6 David Ragan Roush Fenway Racing Ford
32 12 David Stremme Penske Championship Racing Dodge
33 98 Paul Menard Yates Racing Ford
34 7 Robby Gordon Robby Gordon Toyota
35 34 John Andretti Front Row Motorsports Chevrolet
36 09 Brad Keselowski Phoenix Racing Chevrolet
37 82 Scott Speed Red Bull Racing Team Toyota
38 71 David Gilliland TRG Motorsports Chevrolet
39 87 Joe Nemechek NEMCO Motorsports Toyota
40 66 Dave Blaney Prism Motorsports Toyota
41 36 Patrick Carpentier Tommy Baldwin Racing Toyota
42 37 Tony Raines Front Row Motorsports Dodge
43 78 Regan Smith Furniture Row Racing Chevrolet
Failed to qualify
44 51 Dexter Bean BlackJack Racing Dodge
45 27 Ted Christopher Kirk Shelmerdine Racing Toyota
46 64 Mike Wallace Gunselman Motorsports Toyota
The starting order was determined by owner's points after rain cancelled qualifying.
Source:[17][18]

Race

Race results
Pos Grid No. Driver Team Manufacturer Laps Points
1 24 20 Joey Logano Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 273 1901
2 2 24 Jeff Gordon Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 273 1751
3 4 2 Kurt Busch Penske Championship Racing Dodge 273 1701
4 14 00 David Reutimann Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 273 160
5 1 14 Tony Stewart Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 273 1601
6 36 09 Brad Keselowski Phoenix Racing Chevrolet 273 150
7 9 18 Kyle Busch Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 273 146
8 26 77 Sam Hornish Jr. Penske Championship Racing Dodge 273 142
9 3 48 Jimmie Johnson Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 273 1482
10 13 9 Kasey Kahne Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge 273 134
11 21 07 Casey Mears Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 273 130
12 12 42 Juan Pablo Montoya Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet 273 1321
13 20 88 Dale Earnhardt Jr. Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 273 124
14 11 5 Mark Martin Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet 273 1261
15 7 11 Denny Hamlin Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota 273 1231
16 35 34 John Andretti Front Row Motorsports Chevrolet 273 115
17 27 43 Reed Sorenson Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge 273 1171
18 8 16 Greg Biffle Roush Fenway Racing Ford 273 1141
19 5 99 Carl Edwards Roush Fenway Racing Ford 273 106
20 16 33 Clint Bowyer Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 273 103
21 28 96 Bobby Labonte Hall of Fame Racing Ford 273 1051
22 10 17 Matt Kenseth Roush Fenway Racing Ford 273 97
23 18 47 Marcos Ambrose JTG Daugherty Racing Toyota 273 94
24 29 55 Michael Waltrip Michael Waltrip Racing Toyota 273 91
25 34 7 Robby Gordon Robby Gordon Motorsports Toyota 272 931
26 23 19 Elliott Sadler Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge 272 901
27 43 78 Regan Smith Furniture Row Racing Chevrolet 272 82
28 32 12 David Stremme Penske Championship Racing Dodge 272 79
29 6 39 Ryan Newman Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 270 811
30 33 98 Paul Menard Yates Racing Ford 267 73
31 15 31 Jeff Burton Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 251 70
32 30 44 A. J. Allmendinger Richard Petty Motorsports Dodge 238 67
33 19 26 Jamie McMurray Roush Fenway Racing Ford 237 64
34 25 29 Kevin Harvick Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet 231 61
35 17 83 Brian Vickers Red Bull Racing Team Toyota 190 58
36 37 82 Scott Speed Red Bull Racing Team Toyota 189 55
37 22 1 Martin Truex Jr. Earnhardt Ganassi Racing Chevrolet 174 52
38 31 6 David Ragan Roush Fenway Racing Ford 174 49
39 39 87 Joe Nemechek NEMCO Motorsports Toyota 67 46
40 38 71 David Gilliland TRG Motorsports Chevrolet 48 43
41 42 37 Tony Raines Front Row Motorsports Dodge 30 40
42 40 66 Dave Blaney Prism Motorsports Toyota 29 37
43 41 36 Patrick Carpentier Tommy Baldwin Racing Toyota 14 34
1 Includes five bonus points for leading a lap
2 Includes ten bonus points for leading the most laps
Source:[2][40]

Standings after the race

References

  1. ^ "2009 NASCAR Sprint Cup Schedule". ESPN. Archived from the original on September 23, 2016. Retrieved September 19, 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "2009 Lenox Industrial Tools 301". Racing-Reference. NASCAR Digital Media. Retrieved October 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e "The Race: 2009 Lenox Industrial Tools 301". Jayski's Silly Season Site. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved October 4, 2014.
  4. ^ "Weather Information for New Hampshire Motor Speedway". Old Farmer's Almanac. Yankee Publishing. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  5. ^ Pockrass, Bob (June 28, 2009). "Bill Weber won't be part of TNT telecast today". NASCAR Scene. Archived from the original on July 1, 2009. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  6. ^ a b "2009 NASCAR Sprint Cup TV Ratings". Jayski's Silly Season Site. ESPN Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on December 1, 2010. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  7. ^ "NASCAR Race Tracks". NASCAR. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved July 6, 2011.
  8. ^ a b "NASCAR Tracks—The New Hampshire Motor Speedway". New Hampshire Motor Speedway. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011. Retrieved July 6, 2011.
  9. ^ "2009 Official Driver Standings: Toyota/SaveMart 350". NASCAR. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on September 11, 2009. Retrieved April 27, 2015.
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