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2009 College Baseball All-America Team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.[1]

The NCAA recognizes four different All-America selectors for the 2009 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947), Baseball America (since 1981), Collegiate Baseball (since 1991), and the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association (since 2001).[2]

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Transcription

(BLUES MUSIC PLAYS) >>It is a beautiful day for baseball as fans pack into US Cellular Field in Chicago. One fan in particular is paying special attention to every detail. This is where University of Illinois History and Latino studies professor, Adrian Burgos, Jr does his research. His life’s work examines the complex history of America’s past time. >>We’re at US Cellular Field watching the White Sox and Minnesota Twins. We have six Latinos starting today: Jose Abreu at first, Geovanni Soto catching, and Jose Quintana is the starting pitcher. For many Latinos, baseball is about family. It’s not just that guys are out there playing a game and we’re attending as fans, but there’s a history as to how all of us got to that moment. (ATMOSPHERIC MUSIC PLAYS) (MUSIC PLAYS) >>Adrian Burgos, Jr didn’t just stumble into baseball, he was born into it. Born in the Bronx just blocks away from Yankee Stadium, it was only natural for him to fall in love with baseball and for the New York Yankees to become his favorite team. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>My youngest memories is of going to baseball games, Yankee Stadium, with my friends, my family. There’s a part of Yankee Stadium in the right field corner in the bleachers, where the guy use to play cowbells, a Puerto Rican guy. It was kind of a Caribbean feeling of the noise, the cheering. And so for me, that only made me more of a baseball nut. We’d come and visit my grandmother who lived in the Bronx. She was a baseball fan and I asked her, like who do you root for The Yankees or the Mets? And she would say both, but I also root for the team with the most Latinos. And that also shaped how I thought about baseball. And it taught me from an early way about what Latino identity was about. I actually started learning about Latinos in baseball by collecting baseball cards. I would look on the back and I learned the geography of baseball and then I really got fascinated by why is it that so many players from Latin America were baseball players. And that really gave me a love of history and a love of learning what was about Latinos in baseball that spread throughout Latin America. From the time that I was a senior in college, I began to blend my love of history and my love of baseball. (ATMOSPHERIC MUSIC PLAYS) >>It was that love that eventually guided Adrian to the University of Illinois where he continued his research and began to teach others about the “hard questions” of baseball. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>The University of Illinois provided me the perfect setting to begin my career. They understood it was more than baseball history. It’s about American immigration stories. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Taking his classes, I really started looking at the business side and also the individual players and what names are we seeing and who’s on the field. So I definitely became much more of an aware fan. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>For my students, I want them to understand baseball was always more than black and white, it was about brown. (INSTURMENTAL GUITAR MUSIC PLAYS) >>For baseball historians and fans, the ultimate shrine to the game is the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, NY. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>I first came to the Hall of Fame twenty years ago. I never thought that I’d have the opportunity to go from researcher, to consultant, and now to becoming a collaborator with people at the Hall of Fame. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Adrian’s work first came to the Hall of Fame’s attention when he submitted some of his early writings. It was through that that we first began to understand what Adrian could bring that was new and distinctive and quite frankly, filled a gap that we had in our knowledge base here. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>It was then that the Hall of Fame asked Adrian to lend his expertise in the museum’s first bilingual exhibit, Viva Baseball. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>We’re here right now in the Viva Exhibit. This is a new exhibit that we created just a few years ago to talk specifically about the story of Latino baseball players. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Viva Baseball exhibit is wonderful. They did a great job curating it and it starts at the beginning with early Latino players, but also brings you up to the present day. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>It’s the first effort to tell the entire story of Latinos in baseball. It allows us to hear the music, feel the passion, see how Latinos express, and see the history that why are Latinos so passionate about playing the game. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Adrian’s work has even made an impact beyond Cooperstown…to a Hall of Fame Legend. >>Hi, I’m Dave Winfield (STACCATO STRING MUSIC PLAYS) >>I grew up a baseball fan and someone who admired Dave Winfield. Little did I know when I was a professor that one day he would call me. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>It was early 2000’s and I’m working in San Diego an executive with the Padres and I was putting together a tribute to the Negro Leagues. And I called the Hall of Fame and I said “gentlemen, who knows enough about Latin American players that played in the Negro Leagues?” They said Adrian Burgos. They gave me his number and I gave him a call. I surprised him he tells me later that I was one of his favorite players and he dropped everything and we began to talk, been good friends since. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>He brought me out to San Diego to share my research and Dave Winfield told me that he had read my book. And I was a bit incredulous, why would he read my book? So he got the book and showed me how he underlined passages. He said, “Adrian, would you mind signing my book?” And I never thought I would have a hall of famer asking me to sign a book for him. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>He’s taught me a lot. I learned a great deal. He was a fantastic advocate for the guys, he understands his history, he’s met many of these people, he knows them intimately. I appreciated his input, it helped me make the events that I put together just the best that they could be so I appreciate him a great deal. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Baseball had different pathways and that’s also part of what my scholarship has aimed to do is understand that studying Latinos in baseball allows you to understand migration, labor, popular culture. And it allows us then to explore why do Latinos come? Were they recruited? Sometimes yes. Did they come on their own? Yes. And that it’s a complex set of stories about how Latinos become a part of the American fabric. Latinos were the first group of immigrants who came to the United States who already knew baseball. And again many people today when they think about Latinos, “oh, they’re recent rivals”, but Dominicans, Cubans, Venezuelans, Puerto Rican’s: baseballs in the blood. It goes back generations. (MUSIC PLAYS) >>Although they have a foothold in Major League baseball today, it wasn’t always easy for talent coming from Latin America. During almost fifty years of segregation, many Latinos and Afro-Latinos were only permitted to play in the Negro Leagues, an organized league designated for players of color. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>If you look at the history of baseball, it is very intrinsically linked to the development of American culture and society. In many cases that a great positive, but then you look at the negative side of that, the segregation that kept players like Jackie Robinson from playing in the big leagues until 1947. (MUSIC PLAYS) >>In the United States there was the institutionalized, Jim Crowe kind of discrimination that took place. But that black and white perspective of sixteen white baseball owners held true regardless of where the player was from. It was strictly the matter of the color of their skin. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Many of the Latin American subjects that Adrian has written about and researched were players that were dark-skinned Latinos who could not play within the big leagues because of that segregation. Just to play baseball, these men had to endure significant hardships. (MUSIC CONTINUES >>One of the elements that came about in terms of Latino ballplayers was that trying to figure out how to get them into the Major Leagues. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>As Adrian’s research has shown, there were some that had to become as white as possible to fit into the Major Leagues. The darker skinned Latino, regardless of ability, were not given the opportunity while the lighter skinned Latino, very little cultural difference other than the color of their skin, were treated as a novelty. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>One example is Mexican-American ballplayer, Vincente Nava. His team, the Providence Grays, marketed him as “The Spanish Catcher”. Being Spanish was more socially acceptable than being Mexican and even made him an exotic commodity. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Ethnicity was a gate attraction. And so one of the ways we see Latinos being racialized initially, is to sell tickets. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>When it became clear that they were in fact stellar, great baseball players which any baseball man could see, stardom awaited. That stardom could’ve come earlier had baseball not been segregated in the way that it was. (STADIUM SOUNDS) >>It’s a new ballgame now. (MUSIC PLAYS) >>Just because the unofficial ban color barrier was lifted, didn’t mean that attitudes changed right away. (STADIUM SOUNDS) >>We don’t like them boys playing ball around here. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Orlando Cepeda would say, “We have two strikes against us. Because we’re black and because we’re Latino”. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Players who enter the league are dealing with the racial issue of either the dark skin or the Latino heritage, which led to an initial prejudice. Secondly, they had language barriers that prevented them from being able to communicate in a way that their American counterparts could do so without issue. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>One way this was seen was in the press. Sports writers would often quote Latin players speaking phonetically, which did not translate well with their American audience. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Why does one do that? Is to indicate that the person speaking can’t proper English, is probably not as intelligent as the lay reader, and is different from us. He’s probably a foreigner. He’s definitely not a fellow white American. And as I write in Playing America’s Game, it’s the politics of language and representation, but it’s about showing difference. (MUSIC CONTINUES) (STADIUM SOUNDS) >>And so their ability to integrate into the game, to succeed at the highest levels, has come at an even higher threshold then some others that have had to challenge those barriers. (TANGO PLAYS) >>When I grew up in Minnesota, some of the guys on the team I idolized, but I didn’t know where they came from, what their background was. They were just good ballplayers and ballplayers were my heroes. The shortstop, Zoillo Versalles, he was from Cuba. That was the first glove I got, a little 6-fingered glove and I was a shortstop like him. I didn’t know that they may have not made a lot of money or may’ve been taken advantage of or mistreated. They played the game hard and they had fun. And that’s who I would imitate. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>It was a passion and yes, Latinos played the game differently because they had a different cultural sentiment about it. That would create lots of conflict. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Latino ballplayers, because of an inherit passion and joy that they bring to the game, often have been criticized throughout history by their white counterparts for celebrating and for having such joy. Some would even call it excessive energy that they bring to the field and we see this play out today. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Recently we had a pitcher, Bud Norris, who said “This is our game. This is America’s game”. (MUSIC CONTINUES) And Bud Norris doesn’t realize that Latinos have been playing baseball for 150 years. And so it is their game. The Cubans see baseball not as the US game, they see it Americas’ game, plural. And they play it with passion, they love it, and they see it as what they do. (MUSIC PLAYS) >>If a player is not selected for a Major League roster, they typically begin their careers here…in the Minor Leagues. (STADIUM SOUNDS) Here the newest and brightest ballplayers showcase their talents in the hopes of achieving their dreams. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>My name is Ildemaro Vargas. I play second base. I’m Venezuelan. Well from seven years old, as a small child, my mother put me in to play ball. My goal is to keep working hard, finish well, taking advantage of the opportunity and the great moment that I’m living right now. And the future is like every sports player in Major League and maintain myself in Major League. (ATMOSPHERIC MUSIC PLAYS) >>Latino players come to the United States to pursue that baseball dream. The majority of them actually don’t make it. In baseball, October is a very cruel month. It is the moment when the 21, 22, 23 year-old Latino is thinking “am I going to get bumped up to the next level in the minor leagues?” If they don’t get raised to that high A ball or AA level, they could be 21, 22 years old and finish as a professional because there is always another supply of 16 year old Dominicans, Venezuelans who’s ready to take their spot. The entire talent development structure of Major League baseball is reliant upon that fresh supply of very young talent that might project beyond that 21 year old, 22 year old Latino. And so in October, their playing for their baseball lives. But the truth to the story is most of those young Latino players who come at 16 years old never get another a second organization. The chance to come to the United States does help transform their lives. The Latino players send money back to their families. They’re helping not just themselves. And they face the challenge of learning the language because communication is so important in baseball. The biggest challenge, as some of the players would tell me is, it’s when we leave the ballpark. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Well I always knew it would be different from Puerto Rico because we speak Spanish over there. We’re part of the United States but we speak Spanish over there and it’s a different culture. When I signed I had an idea more or less of how life was going to be here, how the situation was going to be and I learned to defend myself in those moments so that when the opportune moment came like I am now of course. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>We have teenagers, 16, 17, younger than my college students who are professional ball players. And I often share with my students as we’re studying about sport and society, do you remember what you were doing at 16 years old? Now put yourself in a foreign country, not speaking the language and being told “you’re a professional, act like it”. What that tells me, the ballplayers who do make it and succeed they faced challenges to become the stars that they are. >>For many baseball hopefuls, they dream of someday playing in the Major Leagues. (HOPEFUL MUSIC PLAYS) One player that was lucky enough to be signed by the Chicago White Sox, was All-Star first baseman, Jose Abreu. Born in Cuba, Jose set out to make his mark on baseball, but still remembers the pain of leaving his homeland. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Well how can I tell you? It was a very difficult step. There was a moment that one felt really bad because you’re leaving a country that watched me be born, raised me, and nothing. Believe me, always a dream of my mother’s to watch me play in Major Leagues and that dream became a reality and I’m grateful to God for having him by me, and be in the best place in the world. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>A third of our clubhouse is from Latin America and the pride that those guys took and the generations that came before them is evident. They don’t just play for the White Sox, they play for a flag as well. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>The White Sox reached out to me when I was an assistant professor because they learned about the research I was doing and how it highlighted the role of Latinos in baseball.The White Sox have sought to highlight their role in history. This is important history to know and it’s even more today because so many more Latinos are in baseball. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>We’ve got such a rich tradition of Latino baseball stars and I think that’s one of Adrian’s skills is to kind of give you a sense of the history and tradition that our game enjoys and that the White Sox enjoys and that stretches back to Chico Carresquel, Luis Aparichio, Ozzie Guillen, and countless others, Minnie Minoso. (BRASS FANFARE) >>The White Sox are getting in trim to make it a real race in the American League this year. Minnie Minoso is one reason for Chicago optimism. (FINGERSTYLE ACOUSTIC GUITAR MUSIC) >>The ballplayer who I think deserves a lot of credit for facing these challenges as being a black Latino in baseball is Orestes, the man we know as “Minnie”, Minoso. He came in 1945 and 46, he started in the Negro Leagues. And Minnie Minoso literally bridged us from the era of segregation and pioneered us into integration. And so his story was of black Latinos breaking into professional baseball in the United States. And Orlando Cepeda said it himself, “Minoso is our Jackie Robinson”. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>The same rules that applied to Jackie Robinson also apply to Minnie Minoso. Although Minnie Minoso wasn’t African American, he was Cuban. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Minoso had to endure the challenge of being black in America and being a foreigner. But also that people expected him to be a “hot-blooded Latin”. And so he had to prove himself every time on the field, carry himself differently. And I think one of the achievements of Minoso in terms of his on-field excellence is that he allowed space for other Latinos like Roberto Clemente and Felipe Alou who were not necessarily of the pioneering generation, but they didn’t have to go through the Negro Leagues. And Minoso combated the image of the hot-blooded Latin on the field so that other Latinos could stand on his shoulder and speak for Latinos very forcibly. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>He played the game hard, he played it the right way, he played it differently. You know he brought some of that Negro Leagues, some of that Latin American style and flash. Stealing bases, just making things happen. That was unusual, there wasn’t a lot of that going on. I’m sure that he was the target of some pitches that most guys may not have gotten. Being one of the first, he just had to overcome a lot of obstacles. (MUSIC PLAYS) >>In 2011, as a professor at the University of Illinois, we were able to give back to Minnie Minoso and honor him with the MLK Award. It was the 60th anniversary of him breaking the color line with the Chicago White Sox. So we brought Minnie to campus, we gave him the award and he was very touched. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Thank you for giving me this. To me, it’s like if you gave me your heart. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Over the past six years we’ve done some special seminars to raise Minnie’s profile on a national level and Adrian was instrumental in helping us there. And as we started to sadly put together his funeral, we needed someone who could eulogize him in a way that put him into context and we thought who better than Adrian. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>As Minnie goes to his eternal home, let us to continue to honor his baseball legacy as the man who opened the modern era of baseball. Que Viva Minoso. (MUSIC PLAYS) >>Baseball has come a long ways. It has gotten to the point now where there’s just no way in the world that we could operate, even in our minds, without the Latino presence in baseball. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>As the Latino legacy in baseball has grown, so has the need to celebrate their rich history. It was obvious that more of their presence was needed to be felt in the halls of Cooperstown. The Hall of Fame once again called on Adrian’s expertise. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>We invited Adrian to be a part of a 5-year program on the Negro Leagues and whether there should be additional Negro Leaguers inducted into the Hall of Fame. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>They valued the work that I did studying Latinos on both sides of the color line, in the Negro Leagues and the Major Leagues. And the Hall of Fame knew of my work and then they created the opportunity to do two things I never thought I would do. How many historians can say that had the opportunity to vote in a Hall of Fame election? In 2006 I was one member of the twelve that were selected to vote on the Negro League election and it was a historic election. It was where the first woman, the only woman who’s in the Hall of Fame, Effa Manley, was elected for her groundbreaking work and really bringing the civil rights movement into the ballpark in the 40’s. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>I feel that my baseball research has illuminated how Latinos were part of the integration story. This is something that I love doing because I get to share what I’m passionate about and then open their eyes to what was right in front of them. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>You can tell when he’s teaching it that he’s so passionate, not just about the game, but about the players of the past. He’s not just a historian in the subject but he’s also just a true fan of the game. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>Two decades ago, there was very little written on people who were not allowed to play in the Major Leagues, so absolutely his work has had an impact. (MUSIC CONTINUES) >>He has helped unearth the ways in which people as a society celebrate this game of baseball and it’s all kind of done with that Adrian smile. (ORGAN MUSIC)

Contents

Key

ABCA American Baseball Coaches Association[2]
BA Baseball America[2]
CB Collegiate Baseball[2]
NCBWA National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association[2]
Awarded the Golden Spikes Award or Dick Howser Trophy as national Player of the Year[2]
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player had been named an All-American at that point[2]
Inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame[3]

All-Americans

Position Name School ABCA BA CB NCBWA Notes
Starting pitcher Mike Leake Arizona State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
ABCA POY[2]
Starting pitcher A.J. Morris Kansas State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Starting pitcher Stephen Strasburg (2) San Diego State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Baseball America and Collegiate Baseball POY,[2] 16.1 K/9 (3rd in Division I),[4] 5.33 H/9 (T-7th in Division I),[4] 23 strikeouts in a single game (March 11, 2008 vs. Utah Utes) (T-3rd in Division I),[4] 1st overall pick in 2009 Major League Baseball Draft[5]
Starting pitcher Louis Coleman LSU
Green tickY
Green tickY
Starting pitcher Eric Arnett (2) Indiana
Green tickY
Green tickY
Starting pitcher Deck McGuire Georgia Tech
Green tickY
Green tickY
Starting pitcher Daniel Bibona UC Irvine
Green tickY
Relief pitcher Addison Reed San Diego State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
20 saves (T-5th in Division I)[4]
Relief pitcher Kyle Bellamy Miami
Green tickY
Green tickY
Relief pitcher Jake Hale Ohio State
Green tickY
Catcher Carlos Ramirez Arizona State
Green tickY
Catcher Tony Sanchez Boston College
Green tickY
Catcher Chris Henderson George Mason
Green tickY
Catcher J. T. Wise Oklahoma
Green tickY
Johnny Bench Award[2]
First baseman Dustin Ackley North Carolina
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Second baseman Derek McCallum Minnesota
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Second baseman Chris Sedon Pittsburgh
Green tickY
Third baseman Marc Krauss Ohio
Green tickY
Green tickY
Third baseman Chris Dominguez Louisville
Green tickY
Green tickY
Third baseman Tommy Mendonca Fresno State
Green tickY
2008 College World Series Most Outstanding Player[6]
Shortstop Jason Marquez New Mexico State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Shortstop Stephen Cardullo Florida State
Green tickY
Shortstop Ben Orloff UC Irvine
Green tickY
86 career sacrifice bunts (Division I record),[4] 34 sacrifice bunts in a single season (2007) (Division I record)[4]
Outfielder Bryce Brentz Middle Tennessee
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Made NBCWA team as UT[2]
Outfielder Kent Matthes Alabama
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Outfielder Jason Kipnis Arizona State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Outfielder Tyler Townsend FIU
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Designated hitter Kyle Roller East Carolina
Green tickY
Designated hitter Rich Poythress Georgia
Green tickY
Designated hitter Matt Alexander Air Force
Green tickY
Utility player Danny Hultzen Virginia
Green tickY

See also

References

  1. ^ The Michigan alumnus. University of Michigan Library. 2010. p. 495. ASIN B0037HO8MY.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "NCAA Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
  3. ^ "College Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". College Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved April 12, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Division I Record Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved April 14, 2012.
  5. ^ "1st Picks Overall in the MLB June Amateur Draft". Baseball Reference. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
  6. ^ "Most Outstanding Player Award in College World Series". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
This page was last edited on 27 March 2018, at 06:37
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