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2003 Detroit Tigers season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2003 Detroit Tigers
Major League affiliations
Location
Results
Record43–119 (.265)
Divisional place5th
Other information
Owner(s)Mike Ilitch
General manager(s)Dave Dombrowski
Manager(s)Alan Trammell
Local televisionWKBD
(Frank Beckmann, Jack Morris)
FSN Detroit
(Mario Impemba, Rod Allen)
Local radioWXYT (AM)
(Jim Price, Dan Dickerson)
< Previous season     Next season >

The 2003 Detroit Tigers season was the team's 103rd season. They finished with the most losses in American League history (119), and came within one loss of tying the 1962 New York Mets for the most losses in modern major league history. This would be the last year in which the team would lose 100 or more games in a season until 2019. The team went 43–119, which surpassed the 1916 Philadelphia Athletics for the most losses in American League history. But due to a shorter season in 1916, the Athletics had a worse winning percentage and seven fewer wins (36-117 record) than the 2003 Tigers. The Tigers were outscored by 337 runs over the course of the season (928 to 591) and finished 47 games behind the Minnesota Twins. Blame for the dismal season was shared by both the pitching staff, which had an ERA of 5.30, and the batters, who finished with a team batting average of .240, 19 points below the American League's .259 batting average. On August 22, the Tigers were eliminated from playoff contention, the fastest playoff elimination until being surpassed by the 2018 Baltimore Orioles, who were eliminated on August 20 that same year.

Season overview

Reeling off yet another losing season in 2002, management found themselves in a big hole: a farm system that wasn't producing, a big-league club with major deficiencies, and contracts being paid to veterans not playing to expectations; those who did produce - Juan Acevedo, Randall Simon, and Robert Fick, did not return for 2003. Piloting the team was first-year manager and longtime Tiger favorite, Alan Trammell, who had a dilemma nearly everywhere on the roster, particularly the starting rotation.  Gary Knotts, who had pitched mostly in relief in his career,was to be converted to a starting role; Detroit area native Steve Avery was looking to make a comeback after not pitching in two years; two untested rookies, Jeremy Bonderman - drafted straight out of high school - and Nate Robertson- acquired in a trade for Mark Redman to the Florida Marlins - also vied for their chances to make the big-league rotation.

Results were nothing short of disastrous. The Tigers lost their first nine games, won their first against Chicago on April 12, then proceeded to drop eight in a row to fall to 1-17. An almost non-existent offense accounted for most of the team's early season woes, batting a paltry .228 as a team in the first half. To the surprise of many, their young corps of pitchers were performing better than expected and remained durable as the team struggled to score runs and the losses continued to pile up - 18 in May, 22 in June - with no reason to expect any change in fortune.

By the end of May, the Tigers were 14–39, 16.5 games out of first, and their season was all but finished. On August 30, after a 5–2 loss to the White Sox, the Tigers had lost 100 games for the second straight season; furthermore, they were gaining nationwide attention as they seemed a sure bet to break the infamous 1962 Mets' record for most losses in a season. Looking for a spark from the farm system, players were constantly being shuffled back and forth between Detroit and nearby Toledo, where the team's Triple-AAA affiliate Toledo Mud Hens played. Unfortunately, the Mud Hens were not well-stocked, either, compounding frustrations for a team already in complete disarray. Meanwhile, the pitching staff, which had remained remarkably intact through the first half, finally collapsed; Mike Maroth lost 21 games, the first MLB pitcher to lose 20 games in a season since Brian Kingman lost 20 for the 1980 Oakland Athletics, while Jeremy Bonderman lost 19 before Trammell mercifully pulled him from the rotation with two weeks remaining. Tigers' starters Maroth, Bonderman and Cornejo were the top three pitchers in losses for the 2003 season, the only time in Major League history that one team had the top three losers in a season.  Franklyn German had the most saves on the team, with five in limited opportunities.

On September 22, the Tigers had lost ten straight and 118 on the season. Just as they appeared likely to go into the record books for futility, the Tigers roared back to life and won five of their last six games to finish 43-119. While it was one game short of the 120 losses by the 1962 Mets, it was still the most losses in American League history and one of the worst seasons for a non-expansion team in modern baseball history. The final series of the season was particularly memorable against the division champion Minnesota Twins, 48 games ahead of Detroit. The Twins sat their starters for almost all of the series in order to keep players rested for the playoffs. On September 27, in their next-to-last game, the Tigers came back from an 8–0 deficit to beat the Twins, 9-8 - on a strikeout wild pitch, an appropriate finish to a team that had struggled mightily all summer long. The Tigers then won the season finale, 9–4, to avoid tying the record and received a standing ovation from the crowd.

While the 2003 Tigers finished with the third-most losses in major league history (behind the 1899 Cleveland Spiders and 1962 Mets), they fare slightly better based on winning percentage.

As of 2020, the 2003 Tigers rank only as the 12th worst team in history based on winning percentage (minimum 120 games), but unlike the 2003 Tigers, most of the other teams usually described as the worst of all time were plagued by significant off-field troubles:

  • The 1899 Spiders (whose owners also owned the St. Louis Browns), the 1916 and 1919 A's (who had been plagued by financial problems) and the 1890 Alleghenys (who had almost all of their star players jump to the Players' League) had been reduced to minor league status.
  • The 1886 Senators and Cowboys, 1889 Colonels, 1897-98 Browns, 1904 Senators and 1935 Braves were all plagued by financial and/or ownership issues, with the Colonels and Braves ownership failing to finish out the season.
  • The 1962 Mets were a first-year expansion team.

For this reason, the 2003 Tigers have been described as being possibly "the worst team of all time without a good excuse."

Designated hitter/left fielder Dmitri Young was the one member of the 2003 Tigers to have a truly good year, with a .297 batting average, 29 home runs, and .537 slugging percentage. According to Win Shares, the Tigers would have had about six fewer wins without him.

On the pitching staff, Jamie Walker stands out as the one pitcher who had a good season. Walker appeared in 78 games (2nd most in the AL) and had an ERA of 3.32 (Adjusted ERA+ of 130).

Some blamed first-year manager Alan Trammellfor the team's performance. However, the 2002 team was 55-106 under manager Luis Pujols and in short, Trammell inherited a team in shambles. The Tigers did not sign any significant new talent in 2003 and lost several key players from the 2002 team, including the team's best starter, Jeff Weaver, closer Juan Acevedo, second baseman Damion Easley, right fielder Robert Fick, and designated hitter Randall Simon.  Dean Palmer, who had 275 career home runs, tried to resuscitate an injury-plagued career, and could not succeed at that; his career came to an end. Even with fellow 1984 teammates Kirk Gibson and Lance Parrish on the coaching staff, Trammell could not turn the team around in 2003.

After the 2003 season, the Tigers acquired Iván Rodríguez, Carlos Guillén, Ugueth Urbina, and Rondell White. With the infusion of new talent, Trammell was able to lead the start of the franchise's turnaround, as the team improved to 72–90 in 2004, a 29-game improvement over the 2003 season which was the largest single-season improvement in the American League since Baltimore's 33-game improvement from 1988 to 1989.

Three years after losing 119 games, the Tigerswent 95-67 and made it to the 2006 World Series. The 2006 pennant winners featured 10 players from the 2003 team: Brandon Inge, Ramón Santiago (who spent 2004 and 2005 with the Seattle Mariners), Craig Monroe, Omar Infante, Mike Maroth, Jeremy Bonderman, Nate Robertson, Jamie Walker, Wilfredo Ledezma, and Fernando Rodney. (Dmitri Young was released in September 2006 following off-field issues)

The record would not be threatened until 2018, when the Baltimore Orioles went 47-115. A year later, the Tigers themselves would also win just 47 games, but due to a cancelled game that reduced their season to 161 games, they only had 114 losses, meaning that Baltimore had the worst team of the entire 2010s decade.

Season standings

AL Central W L Pct. GB Home Road
Minnesota Twins 90 72 0.556 48–33 42–39
Chicago White Sox 86 76 0.531 4 51–30 35–46
Kansas City Royals 83 79 0.512 7 40–40 43–39
Cleveland Indians 68 94 0.420 22 38–43 30–51
Detroit Tigers 43 119 0.265 47 23–58 20–61


Record vs. opponents


Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14]
Team ANA BAL BOS CWS CLE DET KC MIN NYY OAK SEA TB TEX TOR NL 
Anaheim 1–8 3–6 3–4 6–3 6–1 6–3 5–4 3–6 8–12 8–11 6–3 9–10 2–7 11–7
Baltimore 8–1 9–10 2–4 3–3 3–3 3–4 3–4 6–13–1 2–7 4–5 8–11 7–2 8–11 5–13
Boston 6–3 10–9 5–4 4–2 8–1 5–1 2–4 9–10 3–4 5–2 12–7 5–4 10–9 11–7
Chicago 4–3 4–2 4–5 11–8 11–8 11–8 9–10 4–2 4–5 2–7 3–3 3–4 6–3 10–8
Cleveland 3–6 3–3 2–4 8–11 12–7 6–13 9–10 2–5 3–6 3–6 5–2 4–5 2–4 6–12
Detroit 1–6 3–3 1–8 8–11 7–12 5–14 4–15 1–5 3–6 1–8 2–4 1–6 2–7 4–14
Kansas City 3–6 4–3 1–5 8–11 13–6 14–5 11–8 2–4 2–7 4–5 4–3 7–2 1–5 9–9
Minnesota 4–5 4–3 4–2 10–9 10–9 15–4 8–11 0–7 8–1 3–6 6–0 5–4 3–3 10–8
New York 6–3 13–6–1 10–9 2–4 5–2 5–1 4–2 7–0 3–6 5–4 14–5 4–5 10–9 13–5
Oakland 12–8 7–2 4–3 5–4 6–3 6–3 7–2 1–8 6–3 7–12 6–3 15–4 5–2 9–9
Seattle 11–8 5–4 2–5 7–2 6–3 8–1 5–4 6–3 4–5 12–7 4–5 10–10 3–4 10–8
Tampa Bay 3–6 11–8 7–12 3–3 2–5 4–2 3–4 0–6 5–14 3–6 5–4 3–6 11–8 3–15
Texas 10–9 2–7 4–5 4–3 5–4 6–1 2–7 4–5 5–4 4–15 10–10 6–3 5–4 4–14
Toronto 7–2 11–8 9–10 3–6 4–2 7–2 5–1 3–3 9–10 2–5 4–3 8–11 4–5 10–8


Roster

2003 Detroit Tigers
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Transactions

  • November 25, 2002: Randall Simon was traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Pittsburgh Pirates for a player to be named later and Adrian Burnside (minors). The Pittsburgh Pirates sent Roberto Novoa (December 16, 2002) to the Detroit Tigers to complete the trade.[1]
  • November 29, 2002: Ernie Young was signed as a free agent with the Detroit Tigers.[2]
  • January 20, 2003: Bill Haselman was signed as a free agent with the Detroit Tigers.[3]
  • January 23, 2003: Steve Avery was signed as a free agent with the Detroit Tigers.[4]
  • March 27, 2003: Bill Haselman was released by the Detroit Tigers.[3]
  • March 29, 2003: A. J. Hinch was purchased by the Detroit Tigers from the Cleveland Indians.[5]

Game log

2003 Game Log: 43–119 (Home: 23–58; Away: 20–61)
March: 0–1 (Home: 0–1; Away: 0–0)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record Streak
1 March 31 Twins 1–3 Radke (1–0) Maroth (0–1) Guardado (1) 40,427 0–1 L1
April: 3–20 (Home: 1–7; Away: 2–13)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record Streak
2 April 2 Twins 1–8 Mays (1–0) Bonderman (0–1) 21,123 0–2 L2
3 April 3 Twins 0–3 Lohse (1–0) Bernero (0–1) Guardado (2) 8,862 0–3 L3
4 April 4 @ White Sox 2–5 Loaiza (1–0) Cornejo (0–1) Koch (1) 40,395 0–4 L4
5 April 5 @ White Sox 0–7 Buehrle (1–1) Maroth (0–2) 16,972 0–5 L5
6 April 6 @ White Sox 2–10 Marte (1–0) German (0–1) 14,514 0–6 L6
7 April 9 Royals 6–9 Affeldt (1–0) Bonderman (0–2) MacDougal (4) 14,286 0–7 L7
8 April 10 Royals 2–4 Asencio (1–0) Maroth (0–3) MacDougal (5) 9,080 0–8 L8
9 April 11 White Sox 0–5 Loaiza (2–0) Bernero (0–2) 12,577 0–9 L9
10 April 12 White Sox 4–3 Cornejo (1–1) Stewart (0–1) Anderson (1) 12,985 1–9 W1
11 April 13 White Sox 2–3 Colon (1–0) Knotts (0–1) 12,808 1–10 L1
12 April 15 @ Twins 4–6 Lohse (2–1) Maroth (0–4) Guardado (5) 14,036 1–11 L2
13 April 16 @ Twins 2–4 Reed (1–2) Bernero (0–3) Guardado (6) 13,503 1–12 L3
14 April 17 @ Twins 0–6 Rogers (2–0) Bonderman (0–3) 13,015 1–13 L4
15 April 18 @ Royals 3–4 Carrasco (1–0) Anderson (0–1) 38,937 1–14 L5
16 April 19 @ Royals 2–9 Lopez (3–0) Knotts (0–2) 13,777 1–15 L6
17 April 20 @ Royals 3–4 MacDougal (1–0) Maroth (0–5) 16,203 1–16 L7
18 April 22 @ Athletics 5–6 Rincon (1–1) Ledezma (0–1) 11,559 1–17 L8
19 April 23 @ Athletics 4–1 Bonderman (1–3) Zito (3–2) Anderson (2) 23,558 2–17 W1
20 April 24 @ Athletics 0–2 Mulder (3–1) Cornejo (1–2) 11,843 2–18 L1
21 April 25 @ Mariners 0–6 Pineiro (2–1) Maroth (0–6) 33,458 2–19 L2
22 April 26 @ Mariners 6–4 Walker (1–0) Franklin (1–2) Anderson (3) 36,258 3–19 W1
23 April 27 @ Mariners 3–4 Garcia (2–3) Bernero (0–4) Nelson (2) 39,678 3–20 L1
24 April 29 Orioles 3–11 Johnson (4–0) Bonderman (1–4) 10,829 3–21 L2
May: 11–18 (Home: 4–12; Away: 7–6)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record Streak
25 May 1 (1) Orioles 2–5 Ryan (3–0)a German (0–2) Julio (7) 3–22 L3
26 May 1 (2) Orioles 4–6 Daal (2–3) Maroth (0–7) Julio (8) 16,177 3–23 L4
27 May 2 Devil Rays 0–2 Kennedy (2–2) Knotts (0–3) 14,571 3–24 L5
28 May 3 Devil Rays 6–8 Levine (2–1) Ledezma (0–2) 13,371 3–25 L6
29 May 4 Devil Rays 7–3 Bonderman (2–4) Sosa (1–4) Spurling (1) 12,956 4–25 W1
30 May 5 @ Orioles 6–1 Cornejo (2–2) Johnson (4–1) Sparks (1) 17,267 5–25 W2
31 May 6 @ Orioles 7–6 German (1–2) Groom (1–1) 22,906 6–25 W3
32 May 7 @ Orioles 9–4 Knotts (1–3) Daal (2–4) 22,770 7–25 W4
33 May 9 @ Devil Rays 0–2 Parque (1–1) Bernero (0–5) Carter (6) 8,894 7–26 L1
34 May 10 @ Devil Rays 1–3 McClung (3–1) Bonderman (2–5) Carter (7) 12,325 7–27 L2
35 May 11 @ Devil Rays 9–2 Cornejo (3–2) Sosa (1–5) 9,259 8–27 W1
36 May 13 Athletics 1–3 Lilly (3–2) Maroth (0–8) Foulke (11) 12,563 8–28 L1
37 May 14 Athletics 2–1 Avery (1–0) Rincon (2–2) 11,091 9–28 W1
38 May 15 Athletics 2–11 Zito (6–3) Bernero (0–6) 10,513 9–29 L1
39 May 16 Mariners 3–6 Meche (5–2) Bonderman (2–6) Sasaki (5) 17,641 9–30 L2
40 May 17 Mariners 3–6 Moyer (6–2) Cornejo (3–3) Sasaki (6) 23,274 9–31 L3
41 May 18 Mariners 2–6 Pineiro (4–3) Maroth (0–9) 16,263 9–32 L4
42 May 19 @ Indians 9–10 Traber (2–2) Walker (1–1) Riske (1) 16,492 9–33 L5
43 May 20 @ Indians 4–6 Riske (1–0) Roney (0–1) 15,499 9–34 L6
44 May 21 @ Indians 0–4 Sabathia (3–2) Bonderman (2–7) 16,534 9–35 L7
45 May 22 @ Indians 3–2 German (2–2) Phillips (0–1) Sparks (2) 18,347 10–35 W1
46 May 23 @ White Sox 3–2 Maroth (1–9) Gordon (2–4) Spurling (2) 15,069 11–35 W2
47 May 24 @ White Sox 1–0 Knotts (2–3) Loaiza (7–2) German (1) 27,535 12–35 W3
48 May 25 @ White Sox 5–8 Glover (1–0) Sparks (0–1) 21,398 12–36 L1
49 May 26 Indians 6–5 Avery (2–0) Boyd (0–1) German (2) 17,619 13–36 W1
50 May 27 Indians 2–5 Miceli (1–2) Walker (1–2) Baez (10) 10,844 13–37 L1
51 May 28 Indians 2–8 Rodriguez (3–5) Maroth (1–10) 17,388 13–38 L2
52 May 30 Yankees 0–6 Contreras (2–1) Knotts (2–4) 28,003 13–39 L3
53 May 31 Yankees 4–2 Bernero (1–6) Weaver (3–4) German (3) 24,959 14–39 W1
June: 5–22 (Home: 2–12; Away: 3–10)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record Streak
54 June 1 Yankees 9–10 Wells (7–2) Sparks (0–2) Acevedo (6) 44,095 14–40 L1
55 June 3 @ Padres 3–2 Walker (2–2) Lawrence (3–7) German (4) 15,521 15–40 W1
56 June 4 @ Padres 5–3 Ledezma (1–2) Hackman (1–1) German (5) 13,227 16–40 W2
57 June 5 @ Padres 1–5 Eaton (2–4) Bernero (1–7) 14,710 16–41 L1
58 June 6 @ Giants 3–5 Rueter (7–1) Bonderman (2–8) Worrell (15) 41,554 16–42 L2
59 June 7 @ Giants 5–7 Schmidt (5–2) Maroth (1–11) 40,060 16–43 L3
60 June 8 @ Giants 6–7 Nathan (6–2) German (2–3) Worrell (16) 41,177 16–44 L4
61 June 10 Dodgers 1–3 Shuey (3–1) Sparks (0–3) Gagne (22) 13,419 16–45 L5
62 June 11 Dodgers 1–3 Brown (9–1) Bernero (1–8) Gagne (23) 13,716 16–46 L6
63 June 12 Dodgers 2–3 Ishii (6–2) Bonderman (2–9) Gagne (24) 13,644 16–47 L7
64 June 13 Rockies 2–7 Chacon (9–3) Cornejo (3–4) 19,212 16–48 L8
65 June 14 Rockies 9–7 Ledezma (2–2) Elarton (3–2) Spurling (3) 19,260 17–48 W1
66 June 15 Rockies 4–5 Jennings (6–5) Knotts (2–5) Jimenez (16) 19,323 17–49 L1
67 June 17 Indians 4–7 Sabathia (6–3) Bernero (1–9) Baez (15) 13,908 17–50 L2
68 June 18 Indians 1–4 Davis (6–5) Bonderman (2–10) 16,278 17–51 L3
69 June 19 Indians 3–10 Anderson (4–6) Cornejo (3–5) 19,098 17–52 L4
70 June 20 @ Rockies 7–5 Maroth (2–11) Elarton (3–3) 29,603 18–52 W1
71 June 21 @ Rockies 6–9 Jennings (7–5) Sparks (0–4) 35,660 18–53 L1
72 June 22 @ Rockies 3–5 Neagle (1–1) Bernero (1–10) Jimenez (17) 34,723 18–54 L2
73 June 23 @ Red Sox 1–3 Wakefield (6–3) Bonderman (2–11) Timlin (2) 33,814 18–55 L3
74 June 24 @ Red Sox 1–10 Lowe (8–3) Cornejo (3–6) 33,848 18–56 L4
75 June 25 @ Red Sox 2–11 Burkett (6–3) Maroth (2–12) 33,587 18–57 L5
76 June 26 @ Red Sox 4–6 Martinez (5–2) Roney (0–2) Lyon (9) 34,415 18–58 L6
77 June 27 D-backs 3–8 Randolph (2–0) Bernero (1–11) 27,682 18–59 L7
78 June 28 D-backs 0–7 Webb (4–2) Bonderman (2–12) 20,804 18–60 L8
79 June 29 D-backs 3–5 Oropesa (2–1) Spurling (0–1) Valverde (9) 18,989 18–61 L9
80 June 30 Blue Jays 6–2 Maroth (3–12) Lidle (10–6) 13,353 19–61 W1
July: 9–17 (Home: 6–5; Away: 3–12)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record Streak
81 July 1 Blue Jays 5–0 Roney (1–2) Hendrickson (5–6) Walker (1) 15,448 20–61 W2
82 July 2 Blue Jays 2–8 Halladay (12–2) Bernero (1–12) 16,052 20–62 L1
83 July 3 @ Royals 2–3 Affeldt (5–4) Bonderman (2–13) MacDougal (22) 12,978 20–63 L2
84 July 4 @ Royals 8–9 Field (1–0) Cornejo (3–7) MacDougal (23) 39,920 20–64 L3
85 July 5 @ Royals 9–5 Maroth (4–12) Voyles (0–2) Walker (2) 19,030 21–64 W1
86 July 6 @ Royals 3–5 Lima (4–0) Roney (1–3) MacDougal (24) 12,844 21–65 L1
87 July 8 White Sox 2–1 Spurling (1–1) Garland (6–7) Mears (1) 13,643 22–65 W1
88 July 9 White Sox 4–2 Bonderman (3–13) Colon (6–8) Mears (2) 12,869 23–65 W2
89 July 10 White Sox 1–0 Cornejo (4–7) Loaiza (11–5) Mears (3) 18,206 24–65 W3
90 July 11 Red Sox 3–5 Burkett (7–4) Maroth (4–13) Kim (4) 26,538 24–66 L1
91 July 12 Red Sox 2–4 Jones (3–4) Rodney (0–1) Kim (5) 23,206 24–67 L2
92 July 13 Red Sox 3–0 Ledezma (3–2) Wakefield (6–4) Mears (4) 23,829 25–67 W1
93 July 17 @ White Sox 10–9 Maroth (5–13) Colon (6–9) 17,060 26–67 W2
94 July 18 @ White Sox 5–7 Buehrle (8–10) Roney (1–4) Gordon (4) 18,868 26–68 L1
95 July 19 @ White Sox 2–6 Garland (7–7) Cornejo (4–8) Marte (5) 32,245 26–69 L2
96 July 20 @ White Sox 1–10 Loaiza (12–5) Ledezma (3–3) 20,631 26–70 L3
97 July 21 @ Red Sox 5–14 Burkett (8–4) Bonderman (3–14) Fossum (1) 33,823 26–71 L4
98 July 22 @ Red Sox 4–7 Lowe (11–4) Maroth (5–14) 33,570 26–72 L5
99 July 23 @ Indians 1–4 Anderson (8–7) Roney (1–5) Baez (22) 21,202 26–73 L6
100 July 24 @ Indians 7–4 Cornejo (5–8) Sabathia (8–6) Mears (5) 20,857 27–73 W1
101 July 25 Royals 3–8 Hernandez (5–3) Ledezma (3–4) 29,697 27–74 L1
102 July 26 Royals 5–1 Bonderman (4–14) Snyder (1–5) 24,664 28–74 W1
103 July 27 Royals 1–5 Lima (7–0) Maroth (5–15) 35,326 28–75 L1
104 July 29 @ Mariners 5–11 Meche (11–7) Roney (1–6) 30,732 28–76 L2
105 July 30 @ Mariners 3–13 Moyer (14–5) Cornejo (5–9) 35,800 28–77 L3
106 July 31 @ Mariners 0–4 Pineiro (13–5) Ledezma (3–5) 43,596 28–78 L4
August: 6–23 (Home: 3–13; Away: 3–10)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record Streak
107 August 1 @ Twins 4–10 Lohse (7–9) Bonderman (4–15) Baldwin (1) 20,101 28–79 L5
108 August 2 @ Twins 9–2 Maroth (6–15) Reed (5–10) 29,278 29–79 W1
109 August 3 @ Twins 2–7 Santana (5–3) Roney (1–7) 27,613 29–80 L1
110 August 5 Athletics 2–7 Harden (3–0) Cornejo (5–10) 13,263 29–81 L2
111 August 6 Athletics 3–9 Hudson (10–4) Ledezma (3–6) 16,545 29–82 L3
112 August 7 Athletics 3–2 Bonderman (5–15) Zito (8–10) Patterson (1) 19,664 30–82 W1
113 August 8 Twins 3–4 Santana (6–3) Maroth (6–16) Guardado (26) 23,740 30–83 L1
114 August 9 Twins 4–8 Rincón (3–4) Mears (0–1) 19,199 30–84 L2
115 August 10 Twins 3–4 Rogers (9–6) Cornejo (5–11) Guardado (27) 19,975 30–85 L3
116 August 11 @ Rangers 3–9 Benoit (7–5) Sparks (0–5) 27,674 30–86 L4
117 August 12 @ Rangers 7–4 Bonderman (6–15) Dominguez (0–1) Patterson (2) 17,524 31–86 W1
118 August 13 @ Rangers 3–7 Dickey (7–5) Maroth (6–17) Cordero (9) 17,491 31–87 L1
119 August 14 @ Rangers 3–6 Thomson (10–10) Roney (1–8) Cordero (10) 17,019 31–88 L2
120 August 15 @ Angels 1–3 Lackey (8–11) Cornejo (5–12) Percival (26) 43,174 31–89 L3
121 August 16 @ Angels 7–11 Glover (2–0) Ledezma (3–7) 42,337 31–90 L4
122 August 17 @ Angels 6–11 Ortiz (14–10) Bonderman (6–16) 40,745 31–91 L5
123 August 18 Rangers 2–4 Mahay (2–0) Sparks (0–6) Dickey (1) 11,698 31–92 L6
124 August 19 Rangers 4–5 Thomson (11–10) Maroth (6–18) Shouse (1) 13,501 31–93 L7
125 August 20 Rangers 0–6 Dickey (8–5) Cornejo (5–13) 13,788 31–94 L8
126 August 21 Angels 7–10 Sele (7–9) Roney (1–9) 12,236 31–95 L9
127 August 22 Angels 5–6 Ortiz (15–10) Bonderman (6–17) Percival (27) 21,955 31–96 L10
128 August 23 Angels 8–14 Donnelly (2–2) Spurling (1–2) 26,463 31–97 L11
129 August 24 Angels 10–9 Walker (3–2) Percival (0–4) 17,382 32–97 W1
130 August 26 @ Indians 5–4 Cornejo (6–13) Traber (6–7) Walker (3) 16,972 33–97 W2
131 August 27 @ Indians 7–9 Cressend (2–0) Spurling (1–3) Riske (4) 16,457 33–98 L1
132 August 28 @ Indians 3–8 Lee (3–1) Bonderman (6–18) 16,282 33–99 L2
133 August 29 White Sox 8–4 Robertson (1–0) Buehrle (11–13) 15,828 34–99 W1
134 August 30 White Sox 2–5 Garland (10–10) Maroth (6–19) 15,786 34–100 L1
135 August 31 White Sox 1–6 Loaiza (18–6) Cornejo (6–14) 15,873 34–101 L2
September: 9–18 (Home: 7–8; Away: 2–10)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record Streak
136 September 1 Indians 4–7 Santiago (1–1) Walker (3–3) Riske (5) 10,986 34–102 L3
137 September 2 Indians 8–6 Schmack (1–0) Durbin (0–1) Rodney (1) 9,318 35–102 W1
138 September 3 Indians 6–5 Walker (4–3) Santiago (1–2) 10,234 36–102 W2
139 September 4 Indians 2–1 Knotts (3–5) Westbrook (6–9) Patterson (3) 11,371 37–102 W3
140 September 5 @ Blue Jays 6–8 Sturtze (7–6) Maroth (6–20) Lopez (9) 14,455 37–103 L1
141 September 6 @ Blue Jays 0–1 Halladay (19–6) Rodney (0–2) 18,261 37–104 L2
142 September 7 @ Blue Jays 0–8 Towers (5–1) Mears (0–2) 16,617 37–105 L3
143 September 9 @ Yankees 2–4 White (4–0) Rodney (0–3) Rivera (34) 31,826 37–106 L4
144 September 10 @ Yankees 5–15 Pettitte (18–8) Knotts (3–6) 34,000 37–107 L5
145 September 11 @ Yankees 2–5 Clemens (14–9) Cornejo (6–15) Rivera (35) 31,915 37–108 L6
146 September 12 Royals 3–0 Maroth (7–20) Abbott (1–1) Rodney (2) 18,042 38–108 W1
147 September 13 Royals 0–7 Wright (1–1) Mears (0–3) 15,966 38–109 L1
148 September 14 Royals 2–7 Gobble (4–4) Robertson (0–2) 13,579 38–110 L2
149 September 15 Royals 4–10 Anderson (12–11) Knotts (3–7) 9,342 38–111 L3
150 September 16 Blue Jays 6–9 Kershner (2–3) Cornejo (6–16) 9,801 38–112 L4
151 September 17 Blue Jays 0–6 Halladay (21–6) Loux (0–1) 11,240 38–113 L5
152 September 18 Blue Jays 6–10 Towers (7–1) Maroth (7–21) 9,951 38–114 L6
153 September 19 @ Twins 2–6 Milton (1–0) Bonderman (6–19) 30,013 38–115 L7
154 September 20 @ Twins 3–7 Santana (12–3) Robertson (1–2) 26,903 38–116 L8
155 September 21 @ Twins 4–6 Radke (14–10) Cornejo (6–17) Guardado (39) 33,396 38–117 L9
156 September 22 @ Royals 6–12 Affeldt (7–6) Knotts (3–8) 10,574 38–118 L10
157 September 23 @ Royals 15–6 Maroth (8–21) Lima (8–2) 11,180 39–118 W1
158 September 24 @ Royals 4–3 Loux (1–1) Gobble (4–5) Rodney (3) 10,758 40–118 W2
159 September 25 Twins 5–4 Mears (1–3) Thomas (0–1) 9,296 41–118 W3
160 September 26 Twins 4–5 Guardado (3–5) German (2–4) Hawkins (2) 16,518 41–119 L1
161 September 27 Twins 9–8 Rodney (1–3) Orosco (2–2) 14,277 42–119 W1
162 September 28 Twins 9–4 Maroth (9–21) Johnson (0–1) 18,959 43–119 W2

Detailed Records

Player stats

Batting

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Brandon Inge 104 330 67 .203 8 30
Carlos Peña 131 452 112 .248 18 50
Warren Morris 97 346 94 .272 6 37
Eric Munson 99 313 75 .240 18 50
Ramón Santiago 141 444 100 .225 2 29
Craig Monroe 128 425 102 .240 23 70
Alex Sánchez 101 394 114 .289 1 22
Bobby Higginson 130 469 110 .235 14 52
Dmitri Young 155 562 167 .297 29 85
Shane Halter 114 360 78 .217 12 30
Kevin Witt 93 270 71 .263 10 26
Omar Infante 69 221 49 .222 0 8
Andrés Torres 59 168 37 .220 1 9
Matt Walbeck 59 138 24 .174 1 6
Gene Kingsale 39 120 25 .208 1 8
Ben Petrick 43 120 27 .225 4 12
Dean Palmer 26 86 12 .140 0 6
A. J. Hinch 27 74 15 .203 3 11
Danny Klassen 22 73 18 .247 1 7
Craig Paquette 11 33 5 .152 0 0
Hiram Bocachica 6 22 1 .045 0 0
Cody Ross 6 19 4 .211 1 5
Ernie Young 5 11 2 .182 0 0

Note: pitchers' batting statistics not included

Starting and other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Nate Cornejo 32 194.2 6 17 4.67 46
Mike Maroth 33 193.1 9 21 5.73 87
Jeremy Bonderman 33 162.0 6 19 5.56 108
Adam Bernero 18 100.2 1 12 6.08 54
Matt Roney 45 100.2 1 9 5.45 47
Gary Knotts 20 95.1 3 8 6.04 51
Wil Ledezma 34 84.0 3 7 5.79 49
Nate Robertson 8 44.2 1 2 5.44 33
Shane Loux 11 30.1 1 1 7.12 8

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W= Wins; L= Losses; SV = Saves; GF= Games finished; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV GF ERA SO
Jamie Walker 78 4 3 3 19 3.32 45
Chris Spurling 66 1 3 3 18 4.68 38
Franklyn Germán 45 2 4 5 15 6.04 41
Steve Sparks 42 0 6 2 24 4.72 49
Chris Mears 29 1 3 5 16 5.44 21
Fernando Rodney 27 1 3 3 11 6.07 33
Matt Anderson 23 0 1 3 10 5.40 13
Eric Eckenstahler 20 0 0 0 5 2.87 12
Danny Patterson 19 0 0 3 9 4.08 19
Steve Avery 19 2 0 0 5 5.63 6
Brian Schmack 11 1 0 0 1 3.46 4

League Leaders and Awards

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Toledo Mud Hens International League Larry Parrish
AA Erie SeaWolves Eastern League Kevin Bradshaw
A Lakeland Tigers Florida State League Gary Green
A West Michigan Whitecaps Midwest League Phil Regan
A-Short Season Oneonta Tigers New York–Penn League Randy Ready
Rookie GCL Tigers Gulf Coast League Howard Bushong

[6]

See also

Notes

a.^ Ryan was credited with the win without throwing a pitch. With two outs in the bottom of the 7th, he picked off Omar Infante at first to end the inning. The Orioles then took the lead in the top of the eighth, meaning Ryan would be in line for a win. Ryan was replaced with Buddy Groom before the bottom of the eighth. Baltimore kept the lead and Ryan was recorded with the win.[7]

References

  1. ^ Randall Simon Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  2. ^ "Ernie Young Stats".
  3. ^ a b "Bill Haselman Stats".
  4. ^ Steve Avery Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  5. ^ "AJ Hinch Stats".
  6. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 3rd edition. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 2007
  7. ^ MacAree, Graham (December 30, 2020). "B.J. Ryan, a pitcher, once earned a win without actually throwing a pitch". SB Nation. Retrieved January 15, 2021.

External links

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