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1996 Florida Marlins season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1996 Florida Marlins
Major League affiliations
Location
Results
Record80–82 (.494)
Divisional place3rd
Other information
Owner(s)Wayne Huizenga
General manager(s)Dave Dombrowski
Manager(s)Rene Lachemann, Cookie Rojas, John Boles
Local televisionSunshine Network
WBFS-TV
(Gary Carter, Jay Randolph)
Local radioWQAM
(Joe Angel, Dave O'Brien)
WCMQ-FM (Spanish)
(Felo Ramírez, Manolo Alvarez)
< Previous season     Next season >

The Florida Marlins' 1996 season was the fourth season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1995. Their managers were Rene Lachemann, Cookie Rojas, and John Boles. They played home games in Miami Gardens, Florida. They finished with a record of 80-82, 3rd in the National League East.

The Marlins home ballpark at the time had been known as Joe Robbie Stadium since opening. However in the middle of the 1996 season, the Miami Dolphins, who controlled the stadium, sold naming rights to Pro Player by Fruit of the Loom.

Thus, in the middle of the Marlins season on August 26, Joe Robbie Stadium was renamed Pro Player Park. On September 10, after the Dolphins home opener and still before the end of baseball season, the park was renamed Pro Player Stadium, a name which remained though the 2004 season.

Offseason

  • October 8, 1995: Scott Podsednik was sent by the Texas Rangers to the Florida Marlins to complete an earlier deal made on August 8, 1995. The Texas Rangers sent players to be named later to the Florida Marlins for Bobby Witt. The Texas Rangers sent Wilson Heredia (August 11, 1995) and Scott Podsednik (October 8, 1995) to the Florida Marlins to complete the trade.[1]
  • November 21, 1995: Devon White signed as a Free Agent with the Florida Marlins.[2]
  • December 13, 1995: Mark Davis was Signed as a Free Agent with the Florida Marlins.[3]
  • December 22, 1995: Craig Grebeck was signed as a Free Agent with the Florida Marlins.[4]
  • January 5, 1996: Andre Dawson was signed as a Free Agent with the Florida Marlins.[5]
  • January 23, 1996: Aaron Small was selected off waivers by the Seattle Mariners from the Florida Marlins.[6]
  • March 23, 1996: Mark Davis was Released by the Florida Marlins.[3]

Regular season

  • On May 11, 1996, Al Leiter threw the first no hitter in Florida Marlins history. The Marlins beat the Rockies by a score of 11-0.[7]

Season standings

NL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Atlanta Braves 96 66 0.593 56–25 40–41
Montreal Expos 88 74 0.543 8 50–31 38–43
Florida Marlins 80 82 0.494 16 52–29 28–53
New York Mets 71 91 0.438 25 42–39 29–52
Philadelphia Phillies 67 95 0.414 29 35–46 32–49

Record vs. opponents

1996 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14]
Team ATL CHC CIN COL FLA HOU LAD MON NYM PHI PIT SD SF STL
Atlanta 7–5 7–5 5–7 6–7 6–6 5–7 10–3 7–6 9–4 9–3 9–4 7–5 9–4
Chicago 5–7 5–8 5–7 6–6 5–8 8–5 6–6 7–5 7–6 4–9 6–6 7–5 5–8
Cincinnati 5–7 8–5 7–6 3–9 7–6 4–8 3–9 6–6 10–2 5–8 9–3 9–4 5–8
Colorado 7–5 7–5 6–7 5–8 8–5 6–7 3–9 7–5 6–6 7–5 8–5 5–8 8–4
Florida 7–6 6–6 9–3 8–5 7–5 6–7 5–8 7–6 6–7 5–7 3–9 5–7 6–6
Houston 6–6 8–5 6–7 5–8 5–7 6–6 4–9 8–4 10–2 8–5 6–6 8–4 2–11
Los Angeles 7–5 5–8 8–4 7–6 7–6 6–6 9–3 8–4 7–6 6–6 5–8 7–6 8–4
Montreal 3–10 6–6 9–3 9–3 8–5 9–4 3–9 7–6 6–7 7–5 4–8 9–4 8–4
New York 6–7 5–7 6–6 5–7 6–7 4–8 4–8 6–7 7–6 8–5 3–10 6–6 5–7
Philadelphia 4-9 6–7 2–10 6–6 7–6 2–10 6–7 7–6 6–7 7–5 4–8 6–6 4–8
Pittsburgh 3–9 9–4 8–5 5–7 7–5 5–8 6–6 5–7 5–8 5–7 4–9 8–4 3–10
San Diego 4–9 6–6 3–9 5–8 9–3 6–6 8–5 8–4 10–3 8–4 9–4 11–2 4–8
San Francisco 5–7 5–7 4–9 8–5 7–5 4–8 6–7 4–9 6–6 6–6 4–8 2–11 7–6
St. Louis 4–9 8–5 8–5 4–8 6–6 11-2 4–8 4–8 7–5 8–4 10–3 8–4 6–7

Game log

1996 Game Log: 80–82 (Home: 52–29; Away: 28–53)
Legend:           = Win           = Loss
Bold = Marlins team member

Detailed records

Transactions

  • June 4, 1996: Mark Kotsay was drafted by the Florida Marlins in the 1st round (9th pick) of the 1996 amateur draft. Player signed August 15, 1996.[8]
  • July 31, 1996: Dave Weathers was traded by the Florida Marlins to the New York Yankees for Mark Hutton.[9]
  • August 13, 1996: Terry Pendleton was traded by the Florida Marlins to the Atlanta Braves for Roosevelt Brown.[10]
  • August 23, 1996: Gregg Zaun was sent by the Baltimore Orioles to the Florida Marlins to complete an earlier deal made on August 21, 1996. The Baltimore Orioles sent a player to be named later to the Florida Marlins for Terry Mathews. The Baltimore Orioles sent Gregg Zaun (August 23, 1996) to the Florida Marlins to complete the trade.[11]

Roster

1996 Florida Marlins
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Charles Johnson 120 386 84 .218 13 37

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Robb Nen 75 5 1 35 1.95 92

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Charlotte Knights International League Sal Rende
AA Portland Sea Dogs Eastern League Carlos Tosca
A Brevard County Manatees Florida State League Fredi González
A Kane County Cougars Midwest League Lynn Jones
A-Short Season Utica Blue Sox New York–Penn League Steve McFarland
Rookie GCL Marlins Gulf Coast League Juan Bustabad

[12]

References

  1. ^ Scott Podsednik Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  2. ^ Devon White Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  3. ^ a b https://www.baseball-reference.com/d/davisma01.shtml
  4. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/g/grebecr01.shtml
  5. ^ Andre Dawson Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  6. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/s/smallaa01.shtml
  7. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.143, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  8. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/k/kotsama01.shtml
  9. ^ http://www.thebaseballcube.com/statistics/1989/25.shtml
  10. ^ Terry Pendleton Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  11. ^ Gregg Zaun Statistics Baseball-Reference.com
  12. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd edition. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997

External links

This page was last edited on 16 January 2020, at 22:36
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