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1993 College Baseball All-America Team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.[1] In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college and high school).[2] Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American and High School All-American teams.[3] Baseball America magazine selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.[4][5]

Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1993 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors.[6] This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

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  • ✪ Sean McDonough '84

Transcription

(bat hitting ball) (crowd cheering) - I spent a lot of time here as a kid at Fenway Park. It was really special. I knew at a young age I wanted to be a sports broadcaster, and when I knew that's what I wanted to do, more than anything else, I wanted to be the voice of the Boston Red Sox. Every part of my experience at Syracuse University was tremendous. The most important thing that happened to me while I was there was the opportunity to broadcast the Syracuse Chiefs games while I was still in school. I think that's really what propelled me toward being able to be a Major League Baseball broadcaster here with the Red Sox when I was 25 years old. - When you get there, you know the list. You know, when I was there it was Marty Glickman who started it, and it was Marv Albert and Dick Stockton and Bob Costas, and some others. - You know this whole idea of SU as the cradle of sports broadcasters is legitimate. When you're around people with a like-minded interest in broadcasting, and it's kinda the cream of the crop, because people gravitate toward it, then you make each other better. It's a fraternity. It's an ever-growing fraternity, but we're all really proud to be part of it. - And the ball is free! It's picked up by Michigan State's Jalen Watts-Jackson. And he scores on the last play of the game! Unbelievable! - You talk to anybody in the sports world and I think it'd be hard to find a sportscaster, people in his field, that don't say that Sean McDonough is one of the best broadcasters of our generation. - He hacked at the 2-0, now the 2-1. Line drive and a base hit Justice has scored the tying run. Bream to the plate! And he is safe, safe at the plate. - But, I think what sets him apart isn't just his talent and his ability level, it's how he relates to people on a human level. He is an amazing storyteller. When we were all privileged enough to do the Syracuse-UCONN six overtime game, I was a fanboy listening to him. And Bill Raferty and I, at the end of the game, the thing we were most proud of is that we didn't get in his way. We let an artist work. - In the corner, Adrien, no. Overtime number six. (upbeat happy music) - You know for a guy that has been as successful as he has, he's always willing to give time. He's very generous with his money. Probably the first time I've ever said that. I hope he doesn't hear that. And he's just someone who's very selfless. - You know ball one, strike one, that's a first down. That's not that important. Changing people's lives, that's important. I've listened to a lot of student broadcasters over the years. It's one of my favorite parts of going back to campus, to see the eagerness in them to learn, and to achieve their goals, and to achieve their dreams. I want to help them get to that point. You know sometimes you have to have hard conversations, too. Sometimes you have to say to them, in a nice way, "Perhaps producing "would be a good thing for you." No offense. - I don't think there's any question that Sean loves Syracuse. He talks about it so fondly. There's nothing for Syracuse that Sean would not do. There are no lists at Syracuse University, about the impact of great people, not in sports, but in media that can be complete without the name Sean McDonough. - I'm so proud of Syracuse. I love Syracuse. It was a huge part of my life, and it still is, and it always will be. So to be honored in this way by the university that I love, mindful of how many wonderful alumni we have all over the place, this is as meaningful to me as anything.

Contents

Accomplishments

The 1993 All-American class featured three Major League Baseball All-Stars, one Major League Baseball record holder and three World Series champions. As of 2010 Jason Varitek remained active. A total of eight players were selected by all three NCAA-sanctioned selectors: pitchers Dan Choi, and Brian Anderson; catcher Varitek; first baseman Ryan McGuire; second baseman Todd Walker; shortstop Mark Loretta; outfielders Eric Danapilis and Brooks Kieschnick.

Kieschnick was both a 1991 and 1992 selection.[6] He won the 1992 & 1993 Dick Howser Trophy, while Varitek won it in 1994.[7] Varitek was honored by all three selectors in 1992 and 1994 and was player of the year in 1994. Walker, who won the 1993 College World Series Most Outstanding Player,[8] was selected by all three organizations in 1994. Darren Dreifort repeated as a selection from the 1992 team. He won the 1993 Rotary Smith Award and the 1993 Golden Spikes Award, and Varitek won both awards in 1994.[9][10] Both Arizona State and Texas A&M had two players included on the team.

Walker led the National League second basemen in fielding percentage and putouts during the 2002 Major League Baseball season.[11] Loretta was selected for the 2004 MLB All-Star Game. During the 2004 season he led the National League in sacrifice flies and led National League second basemen in assists. Loretta was later selected to the 2006 MLB All-Star Game. During the 2000 season he led National League shortstops in fielding percentage. He accumulated over 1700 career hits and won a Silver Slugger in 2004.[12] Varitek is a three-time MLB All-Star (2003, 2005 & 2008), Gold Glove-winner, Silver Slugger-winner and two-time World Series champion (2004 & 2007).[13] He has called the pitches for a major league record four no-hitters.[14] Paul Lo Duca had the most All-Star game selections of players in the 1993 All-America class with four (2003, 2004, 2005 & 2006). In 2002 and 2003, he led National League catchers in putouts, assists and runners caught stealing. However, in 2004 and 2005 he allowed the most stolen bases and in 2003, 2005 and 2006, he committed the most errors among catchers.[15] In 1998, Brian Anderson led the National League with the fewest bases on balls per 9 innings pitched (1.039), but surrendered the most home runs (39).[16] That season, he was a member of the inaugural Arizona Diamondbacks roster. He was also a member of the Diamondbacks' 2001 World Series Championship team along with 1993 All-American Troy Brohawn.[16][17]

Key

ABCA American Baseball Coaches Association[7]
BA Baseball America[7]
CB Collegiate Baseball[7]
Awarded the Golden Spikes Award, Dick Howser Trophy or Rotary Smith Award as national Player of the Year[7]
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player had been named an All-American at that point[7]
Inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame[18]

All-Americans

Below are the Division I players selected to the various NCAA-sanctioned lists.[19] The default list order is arranged by the position numbers used by official baseball scorekeepers (i.e., 1 – pitcher, 2 – catcher, etc.).

Position Name School ABCA BA CB Notes
Pitcher Darren Dreifort (2) ♦ Wichita State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pitcher Dan Choi Long Beach State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pitcher Brian Anderson Wright State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
2001 World Series champion
Pitcher Jeff Granger Texas A&M
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pitcher Scott Christman Oregon State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pitcher John Powell Auburn
Green tickY
602 career strikeouts (Division I record)[20]
Pitcher Troy Brohawn Nebraska
Green tickY
2001 World Series champion
Pitcher Thad Chrismon North Carolina
Green tickY
41 career saves (8th in Division I),[20] 141 games (3rd in Division I)[20]
Pitcher Paul Thornton Georgia Southern
Green tickY
Catcher Jason Varitek (2) Georgia Tech
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
MLB All-Star (2003, 2005 & 2008), Gold Glove, Silver Slugger, and 2× World Series champion (2004 & 2007)[13] Caught 4 no-hitters[14]
First baseman Ryan McGuire UCLA
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Second baseman Todd Walker LSU
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
1993 College World Series Most Outstanding Player[8]
Third baseman Antonio Fernandez New Mexico
Green tickY
Third baseman Antone Williamson Arizona State
Green tickY
Third baseman George Arias Arizona
Green tickY
Shortstop Mark Loretta Northwestern
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
MLB All-Star (2004 & 2006) and Silver Slugger-winner[12]
Outfielder Eric Danapilis Notre Dame
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Outfielder Marc Sagmoen Nebraska
Green tickY
Green tickY
.451 career batting average (5th in Division I),.[20] 782 career batting average (20th in Division I)[20]
Outfielder Brian Thomas Texas A&M
Green tickY
Outfielder Vee Hightower Vanderbilt
Green tickY
Outfielder Pat Watkins East Carolina
Green tickY
Utility player Brooks Kieschnick (3) ♦ Texas
Green tickY
Green tickY
Made BA team as OF1993 POY (ABCA, BA, CB)[6] 1992 & 1993 Dick Howser Trophy[7]
Designated hitter Paul LoDuca Arizona State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
129 hits in a single season (1993) (T-7th in Division I),[20] 4x MLB All-Star (2003, 2004, 2005 & 2006)

See also

References

General
  • "Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
Inline citations
  1. ^ The Michigan alumnus. University of Michigan Library. 2010. p. 495. ASIN B0037HO8MY.
  2. ^ "This is the ABCA". American Baseball Coaches Association. September 20, 2007. Archived from the original on April 2, 2010. Retrieved May 20, 2010.
  3. ^ "All Americans: Collegiate Baseball Newspaper". Collegiate Baseball Newspaper Inc. Retrieved May 20, 2010.
  4. ^ "College: Awards: All-America Teams". Baseball America Inc. Archived from the original on April 23, 2010. Retrieved May 20, 2010.
  5. ^ "College: Awards: Player Of The Year". Baseball America Inc. Archived from the original on April 23, 2010. Retrieved May 20, 2010.
  6. ^ a b c "Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g "NCAA Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved April 8, 2012.
  8. ^ a b "Most Outstanding Player Award". CWS Omaha, Inc. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  9. ^ "Rotary Smith Award". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  10. ^ "Previous Golden Spikes Award Winners". USA Golden Spikes Award. Archived from the original on September 21, 2010. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  11. ^ "Todd Walker". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  12. ^ a b "Mark Loretta". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  13. ^ a b "Jason Varitek". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on May 11, 2010. Retrieved May 13, 2010.
  14. ^ a b Kaplan, Thomas (May 21, 2008). "Red Sox' No-Hitter Puts Varitek in Record Books". The New York Times. Retrieved May 13, 2010.
  15. ^ "Paul Lo Duca". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  16. ^ a b "Brian Anderson". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  17. ^ "Troy Brohawn". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on May 30, 2010. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  18. ^ "College Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". College Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved April 12, 2012.
  19. ^ "Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  20. ^ a b c d e f "Division I Record Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved April 14, 2012.


This page was last edited on 1 October 2019, at 03:37
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