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1987 Major League Baseball season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1987 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 6 – October 25, 1987
Number of games162
Number of teams26
TV partner(s)ABC, NBC
Draft
Top draft pickKen Griffey Jr.
Picked bySeattle Mariners
Regular season
Season MVPNL: Andre Dawson (CHC)
AL: George Bell (TOR)
Postseason
AL championsMinnesota Twins
  AL runners-upDetroit Tigers
NL championsSt. Louis Cardinals
  NL runners-upSan Francisco Giants
World Series
ChampionsMinnesota Twins
  Runners-upSt. Louis Cardinals
World Series MVPFrank Viola (MIN)
 MLB seasons

The 1987 Major League Baseball season ended with the American League Champion Minnesota Twins winning the World Series over the National League Champion St. Louis Cardinals, four games to three, as all seven games were won by the home team.

In June, future Hall of Fame outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. was selected with the number one overall pick in the Major League Baseball draft, by the Seattle Mariners.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • 1987 World Series, Game 7: Cardinals @ Twins

Transcription

Awards and honors

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA Award National League American League
Rookie of the Year Benito Santiago (SD) Mark McGwire (OAK)
Cy Young Award Steve Bedrosian (PHI) Roger Clemens (BOS)
Manager of the Year Buck Rodgers (MTL) Sparky Anderson (DET)
Most Valuable Player Andre Dawson (CHC) George Bell (TOR)
Gold Glove Awards
Position National League American League
Pitcher Rick Reuschel (SF)/(PIT) Mark Langston (SEA)
Catcher Mike Lavalliere (PIT) Bob Boone (CAL)
First Baseman Keith Hernandez (NYM) Don Mattingly (NYY)
Second Baseman Ryne Sandberg (CHC) Frank White (KC)
Third Baseman Terry Pendleton (STL) Gary Gaetti (MIN)
Shortstop Ozzie Smith (STL) Tony Fernández (TOR)
Outfielders Eric Davis (CIN) Jesse Barfield (TOR)
Andre Dawson (CHC) Kirby Puckett (MIN)
Tony Gwynn (SD) Dave Winfield (NYY)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Bob Forsch (STL) Paul Molitor (MIL)
Catcher Benito Santiago (SD) Matt Nokes (DET)
First Baseman Jack Clark (STL) Don Mattingly (NYY)
Second Baseman Juan Samuel (PHI) Lou Whitaker (DET)
Third Baseman Tim Wallach (MTL) Wade Boggs (BOS)
Shortstop Ozzie Smith (STL) Alan Trammell (DET)
Outfielders Eric Davis (CIN) George Bell (TOR)
Andre Dawson (CHC) Dwight Evans (BOS)
Tony Gwynn (SD) Kirby Puckett (MIN)

Other awards

Player of the Month

Month American League National League
April Brian Downing Eric Davis
May Larry Parrish Eric Davis
June Wade Boggs Tony Gwynn
July Don Mattingly Bo Díaz
August Dwight Evans Andre Dawson
September Alan Trammell Darryl Strawberry

Pitcher of the Month

Month American League National League
April Bret Saberhagen Sid Fernandez
May Jim Clancy Steve Bedrosian
June Steve Ontiveros Orel Hershiser
July Frank Viola Floyd Youmans
August Mark Langston Doug Drabek
September Doyle Alexander Pascual Pérez

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Wade Boggs, Boston Red Sox .363 Tony Gwynn, San Diego Padres .370
HR Mark McGwire, Oakland Athletics 49 Andre Dawson, Chicago Cubs 49
RBIs George Bell, Toronto Blue Jays 134 Andre Dawson, Chicago Cubs 137
Wins Roger Clemens, Boston Red Sox
Dave Stewart, Oakland Athletics
20 Rick Sutcliffe, Chicago Cubs 18
ERA Jimmy Key, Toronto Blue Jays 2.76 Nolan Ryan, Houston Astros 2.76
SO Mark Langston, Seattle Mariners 262 Nolan Ryan, Houston Astros 270
SV Tom Henke, Toronto Blue Jays 34 Steve Bedrosian, Philadelphia Phillies 40
SB Harold Reynolds, Seattle Mariners 60 Vince Coleman, St. Louis Cardinals 109

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
      
East Detroit 1
West Minnesota 4
AL Minnesota 4
NL St. Louis 3
East St. Louis 4
West San Francisco 3

Managers

American League

Team Manager Notes
Baltimore Orioles Cal Ripken, Sr.
Boston Red Sox John McNamara
California Angels Gene Mauch Mauch's final season as a Major League manager
Chicago White Sox Jim Fregosi
Cleveland Indians Pat Corrales, Doc Edwards
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson Won AL East
Kansas City Royals Billy Gardner, John Wathan
Milwaukee Brewers Tom Trebelhorn
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly Won World Series
New York Yankees Lou Piniella
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Dick Williams
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine
Toronto Blue Jays Jimy Williams 2nd season as Blue Jays manager

National League

Team Manager Notes
Atlanta Braves Chuck Tanner
Chicago Cubs Gene Michael, Frank Lucchesi Michael's final season as a Major League manager
Cincinnati Reds Pete Rose
Houston Astros Hal Lanier
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Buck Rodgers
New York Mets Davey Johnson
Philadelphia Phillies John Felske, Lee Elia Felske's final season as a Major League manager
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Whitey Herzog Won National League Pennant
San Diego Padres Larry Bowa
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig Won NL West

Home field attendance and payroll

Team name Wins Home attendance Per game Est. payroll
St. Louis Cardinals[1] 95 20.3% 3,072,122 24.3% 37,927 $11,758,000 19.1%
New York Mets[2] 92 -14.8% 3,034,129 9.6% 37,458 $13,846,714 -10.0%
Los Angeles Dodgers[3] 73 0.0% 2,797,409 -7.5% 34,536 $14,474,737 -4.9%
Toronto Blue Jays[4] 96 11.6% 2,778,429 13.2% 34,302 $10,765,401 -15.9%
California Angels[5] 75 -18.5% 2,696,299 1.5% 33,288 $13,855,999 -4.0%
New York Yankees[6] 89 -1.1% 2,427,672 7.0% 29,971 $19,457,714 5.2%
Kansas City Royals[7] 83 9.2% 2,392,471 3.1% 29,537 $12,513,056 -4.1%
Boston Red Sox[8] 78 -17.9% 2,231,551 3.9% 27,894 $13,770,171 -4.4%
Cincinnati Reds[9] 84 -2.3% 2,185,205 29.1% 26,978 $9,281,500 -22.0%
Philadelphia Phillies[10] 80 -7.0% 2,100,110 8.6% 25,927 $12,482,997 7.7%
Minnesota Twins[11] 85 19.7% 2,081,976 65.8% 25,703 $10,585,000 11.4%
Detroit Tigers[12] 98 12.6% 2,061,830 8.5% 25,455 $12,122,881 -1.7%
Chicago Cubs[13] 76 8.6% 2,035,130 9.5% 25,439 $15,473,026 -10.1%
San Francisco Giants[14] 90 8.4% 1,917,168 25.4% 23,669 $8,532,500 -4.6%
Houston Astros[15] 76 -20.8% 1,909,902 10.1% 23,579 $12,758,371 29.2%
Milwaukee Brewers[16] 91 18.2% 1,909,244 50.9% 23,571 $7,293,224 -26.7%
Montreal Expos[17] 91 16.7% 1,850,324 63.9% 22,844 $8,762,052 -21.1%
Baltimore Orioles[18] 67 -8.2% 1,835,692 -7.0% 22,386 $14,250,273 9.6%
Texas Rangers[19] 75 -13.8% 1,763,053 4.2% 21,766 $5,992,718 -11.1%
Oakland Athletics[20] 81 6.6% 1,678,921 27.7% 20,727 $12,730,839 30.2%
San Diego Padres[21] 65 -12.2% 1,454,061 -19.5% 17,951 $12,065,796 6.0%
Atlanta Braves[22] 69 -4.2% 1,217,402 -12.2% 15,030 $17,444,560 2.0%
Chicago White Sox[23] 77 6.9% 1,208,060 -15.2% 14,914 $12,135,343 16.5%
Pittsburgh Pirates[24] 80 25.0% 1,161,193 16.0% 14,336 $8,789,500 -19.6%
Seattle Mariners[25] 78 16.4% 1,134,255 10.2% 14,003 $4,623,000 -22.4%
Cleveland Indians[26] 61 -27.4% 1,077,898 -26.8% 13,307 $9,033,750 15.7%

Television coverage

Network Day of week Announcers
ABC Monday nights
Sunday afternoons
Al Michaels, Jim Palmer, Tim McCarver, Gary Bender
NBC Saturday afternoons Vin Scully, Joe Garagiola, Bob Costas, Tony Kubek

Events

References

  1. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. ^ "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. ^ Mackin, Bob (2004). The Unofficial Guide to Baseball's Most Unusual Records. Canada: Greystone Books. p. 240. ISBN 9781553650386.

External links

This page was last edited on 26 February 2024, at 21:46
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