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1984 in baseball

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following are the baseball events of the year 1984 throughout the world.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • 1984 Week 1 This Week in Baseball Mel Allen TWIB MLB
  • 1984 Week 3 This Week in Baseball Mel Allen TWIB MLB
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  • 1984 Week 4 This Week in Baseball TWIB Mel Allen MLB

Transcription

Champions

Major League Baseball

League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
      
East Detroit 3
West Kansas City 0
AL Detroit 4
NL San Diego 1
East Chicago Cubs 2
West San Diego 3

Other champions

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Don Mattingly NYY .343 Tony Gwynn SDP .351
HR Tony Armas BOS 43 Dale Murphy ATL
Mike Schmidt PHI
36
RBI Tony Armas BOS 123 Gary Carter MON
Mike Schmidt PHI
106
Wins Mike Boddicker BAL 20 Joaquín Andújar STL 20
ERA Mike Boddicker BAL 2.79 Alejandro Peña LAD 2.48

Major league baseball final standings

Events

January

February

  • February 8 - The Oakland Athletics make use of an obscure loophole to select pitcher Tim Belcher from the new York Yankees as a free agent compensation pick. Belcher had just been drafted by the Yankees earlier that year in the free agent draft. Because the Yankees mistakenly thought he wasn't eligible to be drafted, they didn't need to protect him. The matter went to an arbitrator who ruled in favor of Oakland.
  • February 17 - The Houston Astros signed J.R. Richard. Richard was attempting to make a comeback after complications from a stroke ended his career years earlier. Richard was not successful in his comeback attempt.
  • February 21 - Dusty Baker is granted free agency by the Los Angeles Dodgers.

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Movies

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

  • January 1 – Hazel Measner, 58, Canadian pitcher who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League in its 1946 season.
  • January 6 – Billy Lee, 89, who appeared in 25 games, chiefly as an outfielder, for the 1914–1915 St. Louis Browns.
  • January 18 – Leo Kiely, 54, pitcher for the Boston Red Sox in the 1950s, who in 1957 set two PCL records with 20 wins in relief, 14 of them in consecutive games, and also became the first major leaguer to play in Japanese Baseball, for the Mainichi Orions, in 1953.
  • January 22 – Johnny Spencer, 86, outfielder who played in 1921 and 1922 for the Pittsburgh Keystones of the Negro National League and the barnstorming Homestead Grays.
  • January 28 – Ray Harrell, 71, pitcher who worked in 119 total games over six seasons spanning 1935 to 1945 for five National League clubs, principally the St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies.
  • January – Frank Russell, 62, second baseman, third baseman and outfielder for the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro National League (1943–1944, 1946, 1948).

February

  • February 10 – Johanna Hageman, 65, one of the sixty original members of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League in 1943.
  • February 14 – Loren Babe, 56, third baseman who played in 120 games for the New York Yankees (1952–1953) and Philadelphia Athletics (1953); later a minor league manager and MLB coach for the Yankees (1967) and Chicago White Sox (1979–1980 and 1983).
  • February 19 – Bill Shores, 79, pitcher who worked in 96 career games for the 1928–1931 Philadelphia Athletics, 1933 New York Giants and 1937 Chicago White Sox; member of three World Series champion clubs (1929, 1930, 1933).
  • February 20 – Dale Matthewson, 60, pitcher who made 28 total appearances for wartime 1943–1944 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • February 26 – Joe Kuhel, 77, first baseman who played in 2,104 games for the Washington Senators and Chicago White Sox between 1930 and 1947; known for strong defense, batted .300 three times; manager of Senators in 1948 and 1949.

March

  • March 8 – Bruce Cunningham, 78, pitcher who appeared in 104 games for 1929–1932 Boston Braves.
  • March 9 – Ping Gardner, 69, pitcher in Negro leagues between 1923 and 1932; led Eastern Colored League in games lost (ten) in 1928.
  • March 10 – Bill McGhee, 75, first baseman and left fielder who played 170 games for wartime 1944–1945 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • March 14 – "Gentleman John" Enzmann, 94, pitcher for 1914 Brooklyn Robins and 1918–1920 Cleveland Indians, who made 67 MLB appearances; member of 1920 World Series champions.
  • March 15 – Buckshot May, 84, pitcher whose 13 years in the minor leagues were punctuated by one game and one inning pitched for the Pittsburgh Pirates on May 9, 1924.
  • March 18 – Charley Lau, 50, backup catcher and pinch-hitter for four MLB clubs between 1956 and 1967 who became a renowned hitting instructor, with the Chicago White Sox since 1982; earned fame as the Kansas City Royals' batting coach (1971–1978) where his star pupil was George Brett.
  • March 20 – Stan Coveleski, 94, Hall of Fame pitcher who had five 20-win seasons with the Indians and Senators, and led Cleveland to the 1920 World Series championship with three victories over the Brooklyn Dodgers; spitballer led AL in ERA twice and strikeouts once.
  • March 26 – Norman "Bobby" Robinson, 70, centerfielder for the Baltimore Elite Giants and Birmingham Black Barons of the Negro leagues; due to an injury, lost his centerfield job to 17-year-old Willie Mays in 1948.
  • March 27 – Oliverio "Baby" Ortíz, 64, Cuban pitcher who made two appearances as a starting hurler for the wartime 1944 Washington Senators.
  • March 28 – Jess Pike, 68, outfielder who played 14 years in the minor leagues, but in only 16 games for 1946 New York Giants as a 30-year-old rookie.
  • March 29 – Hugh Poland, 74, catcher in 83 games for four NL teams between 1943 and 1948; longtime scout for Giants in New York and San Francisco.

April

  • April 2 – Ike Davis, 88, shortstop for the 1919 Washington Senators and 1924–1925 Chicago White Sox, appearing in 164 career games.
  • April 5 – Chet Kehn, 62, pitcher for the 1942 Brooklyn Dodgers, and one of many players who only appeared in the majors during World War II.
  • April 6 – Glenn Wright, 83, shortstop for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers, and Chicago White Sox between 1924 and 1935; batted .294 lifetime with 94 home runs in 1,119 games; member of 1925 World Series champion Pirates; later, a minor-league manager and longtime scout.
  • April 10 – Karl Spooner, 52, Brooklyn Dodgers southpaw who threw complete-game shutouts in his first two MLB appearances in September 1954 — striking out 27 and allowing only seven hits in 18 innings pitched; however, his pitching career was ultimately ruined by a shoulder injury sustained the following spring; appeared in 31 total National League games (1954–1955) and two World Series contests (1955, for the champion Dodgers).
  • April 11 – Leo Dixon, 89, catcher for 1925 to 1927 St. Louis Browns and 1929 Cincinnati Reds, appearing in 159 career games.
  • April 17 – Sanford Jackson, 84, centerfielder/shortstop/third baseman in the Negro leagues between 1924 and 1932, chiefly for the Chicago American Giants and Memphis Red Sox; two-time Negro World Series champion.
  • April 26 – Alonza Bailey, 80, pitcher for the Newark Dodgers of the Negro National League in 1933 and 1934.
  • April 29 – Howie Gorman, 70, outfielder who played in 14 games for the Philadelphia Phillies during 1937 and 1938.

May

  • May 11 – Earl Reid, 70, pitcher who appeared in two games (winning his only decision) for the Boston Braves in May 1946.
  • May 13 – Walter French, 84, reserve outfielder who hit .303 lifetime in 397 career games for the Philadelphia Athletics (1923 and 1925–1929); member of 1929 World Series champions.
  • May 13 – Russ Young, 81, switch-hitting catcher who got into 16 games for the 1931 St. Louis Browns.
  • May 14 – Elmer Riddle, 69, standout pitcher for early 1940s Cincinnati Reds, posting a 19–4 mark in 1941 and leading NL in earned run average (2.24), then, two years later, leading his circuit in wins (21); member of 1940 World Series champions; brother of Johnny Riddle.
  • May 15 – Nick Goulish, 67, outfielder and pinch hitter who got into 14 games for wartime 1944–1945 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • May 16 – Andrew "Pat" Patterson, 72, six-time All-Star second baseman in the Negro leagues who played between 1934 and 1947; member, 1946 Negro World Series champion Newark Eagles.
  • May – Leroy Sutton, 63, pitcher for six years (1940 to 1945) in the Negro American League for the St. Louis–New Orleans Stars, Chicago American Giants and Cincinnati–Indianapolis Clowns.

June

  • June 7 – Rabbit Benton, 82, second baseman who played five games for the 1922 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • June 9 – Bobby Rhawn, 65, infielder who played in 90 games for the New York Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago White Sox from 1947 to 1949.
  • June 17 – Jim Hegan, 63, five-time All-Star catcher for the Cleveland Indians (and member of 1948 World Series champions) and four other teams between 1941 and 1960, known for outstanding defense; later a longtime New York Yankees coach; son Mike had a long career as first baseman and broadcaster.
  • June 24 – Jim Roberts, 88, pitcher who appeared in a dozen games for 1924–1925 Brooklyn Robins.

July

  • July 4 – Doyt Morris, 67, outfielder who appeared in six games with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1937.
  • July 8 – Ralph Coles, 71, outfielder for the Cleveland Bears and Jacksonville Red Caps of the Negro American League from 1939 to 1941.
  • July 9 – Charlie Uhlir, 71, outfielder for Chicago White Sox in 1934.
  • July 11 – Moose Clabaugh, 82, outfielder who had an 11-game trial with 1926 Brooklyn Robins, the same season he slugged 62 home runs to lead the Class D East Texas League in round-trippers.
  • July 11 – Lyle Luttrell, 54, shortstop who appeared in 57 games for the 1956–1957 Washington Senators.
  • July 14 – Al Schacht, 91, pitcher (1919–1921) and coach (1924–1934) for Washington Senators famous for his on-field comedy routines with fellow coach Nick Altrock; also coached for Boston Red Sox (1935–1936); known as "The Clown Prince of Baseball", he continued to entertain fans at major and minor league parks thereafter.
  • July 16 – Bernell Longest, 66, second baseman for the Chicago American Giants and Cleveland Buckeyes of the Negro American League between 1946 and 1948.
  • July 16 – Ed Short, 64, Chicago White Sox front office executive from 1950 through 1970, and general manager from August 26, 1961 to September 2, 1970.
  • July 22 – Johnny Washington, 68, three-time All-Star first baseman and 1940 Negro National League batting champion who played for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, New York Black Yankees and Baltimore Elite Giants between 1936 and 1948.
  • July 24 – Jake Dunn, 74, played every position but catcher (though primarily a shortstop and right fielder) during his Negro leagues career from 1930 to 1943.
  • July 31 – Beans Reardon, 86, National League umpire from 1926 to 1949 who worked in five World Series; known for his colorful arguments and continued use of the outside ("balloon") chest protector within the NL.

August

  • August 3 – Elmer Smith, 91, outfielder in 1,012 games for five clubs, principally the Cleveland Naps/Indians, for ten seasons spanning 1914 to 1925; member of 1920 World Series champions.
  • August 6 – Johnnie Dawson, 69, catcher who played for four Negro American League teams, notably the Kansas City Monarchs, between 1938 and 1942.
  • August 8 – Bert Hamric, 56, outfielder by trade who appeared in ten MLB games as a pinch hitter for the 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers and 1958 Baltimore Orioles.
  • August 14 – Spud Davis, 79, good-hitting catcher (.308 career average and 1,312 hits) who played in 1,458 games over 16 seasons (1928–1941 and 1944–1945) for four National League clubs; member of world-champion 1934 St. Louis Cardinals; later, a coach who managed 1946 Pittsburgh Pirates for three end-of-season games.
  • August 14 – Lynn McGlothen, 34, pitcher for six MLB clubs between 1972 and 1982 who had his best years with the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs; 1974 National League All-Star.
  • August 15 – Tom Gee, 84, catcher for the 1925–1926 New York Lincoln Giants and 1926 Newark Eagles of the Eastern Colored League.
  • August 16 – Tommie Aaron, 45, first baseman and left fielder who played for the Braves in Milwaukee and Atlanta, and Braves coach since 1978; younger brother of Hank Aaron.
  • August 22 – Roy Tyler, 84, outfielder who played for three Negro National League clubs between 1925 and 1933.
  • August 23 – Charlie Robertson, 88, pitcher who spent most of his career with the Chicago White Sox; pitched a perfect game in 1923 against the Tigers in his fourth major league start; last survivor of the 1919 White Sox team.
  • August 25 – Waite Hoyt, 84, Hall of Fame pitcher whose 237 victories included 20-win seasons for the Yankees in 1927–1928; won six World Series games, giving up only two unearned runs in three complete games in the 1921 Series; Cincinnati Reds' play-by-play broadcaster from 1942 to 1965.
  • August 24 – Roy Easterwood, 69, catcher and pinch hitter who played in 17 games for the wartime 1944 Chicago Cubs.
  • August 25 – Skeeter Scalzi, 71, infielder and pinch runner who appeared in 11 games for 1939 New York Giants; longtime minor-league manager.
  • August 26 – Bill Trotter, 74, pitcher who worked in 163 games for the St. Louis Browns (1937–1942), Washington Senators (1942) and St. Louis Cardinals (1944).
  • August 31 – Audrey Wagner, 56, All-Star outfielder in the AAGPBL who won three home run titles, a batting crown, and the 1948 Player of the Year Award.

September

  • September 7 – Joe Cronin, 77, Hall of Fame shortstop and manager, and AL president from 1959 to 1973, who batted .301 lifetime and had eight 100-RBI seasons; managed Washington Senators to 1933 pennant at age 26, won 1946 flag with Boston Red Sox, and was general manager of the Red Sox from 1948 to January 1959.
  • September 10 – Johnny Marcum, 75, good-hitting pitcher (141 hits, .265 lifetime) who appeared in 299 American League games (including 195 mound appearances and 113 pinch-hitting assignments) for Philadelphia (1933–1935), Boston (1936–1938), St. Louis (1939) and Chicago (1939).
  • September 11 – Paul Carter, 90, right-hander who pitched in 127 games for the 1914–1915 Cleveland Naps/Indians and 1916–1920 Chicago Cubs.
  • September 14 – Edgar Barnhart, 79, St. Louis Browns pitcher who hurled one scoreless inning in his only MLB game, on September 23, 1924.
  • September 14 – Jimmy Pofahl, 67, shortstop-second baseman for Washington who got into 225 career games between 1940 and 1942.
  • September 26 – Walt Bashore, 74, outfielder and pinch hitter in ten games for the 1936 Philadelphia Phillies.

October

  • October 1 – Walter Alston, 72, Hall of Fame manager who guided Dodgers teams in Brooklyn and Los Angeles to seven National League pennants and four World Series championships between 1954 and 1976; his 2,040 wins ranked behind only John McGraw in NL history upon retirement.
  • October 1 – Billy Goodman, 58, All-Star infielder, principally for the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox, who won the 1950 AL batting title; later a coach for the Atlanta Braves.
  • October 4 – Joe Marty, 71, center fielder who played 538 games for the 1937–1939 Chicago Cubs and 1939–1941 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • October 7 – Art Butler, 96, shortstop/second baseman who appeared in 454 games for Boston, Pittsburgh and St. Louis of the National League from 1911 to 1916.
  • October 13 – Dixie Carroll, 93, speedy outfielder who played in 15 games for the 1919 Boston Braves.
  • October 13 – Ed Carroll, 77, pitcher for the 1929 Boston Red Sox.
  • October 13 – George Kelly, 89, Hall of Fame first baseman, nicknamed "High Pockets", who batted over .300 six straight years with the New York Giants from 1921 to 1926; led NL in RBI (1920, 1924) and home runs (1921); later a coach and scout.
  • October 15 – Red Cox, 89, pitched three games for the 1920 Detroit Tigers.
  • October 19 – Del Lundgren, 85, pitched from 1924 through 1927 for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Red Sox.
  • October 21 – Johnny Rigney, 69, one of the Chicago White Sox' top pitchers in the years prior to World War II, who later became the club's farm system director and, from 1956 to 1958, co-general manager; husband of Dorothy Comiskey.
  • October 22 – Babe Pinelli, 89, National League umpire from 1935 to 1956, previously a Reds third baseman; he worked in six World Series, last calling balls and strikes on Don Larsen's perfect game in 1956.
  • October 25 – Joe Wiggins, 78, infielder who played in the Negro leagues between 1930 and 1934.
  • October 26 – Gus Mancuso, 78, catcher who appeared in 1,460 games for five National League clubs between 1928 and 1945; played on five pennant winners and two World Series champions with the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Giants; two-time NL All-Star.
  • October 27 – Hank Helf, 71, backup catcher who played for Cleveland Indians (seven total games in 1938 and 1940) and St. Louis Browns (71 games in 1946) who, in a 1938 publicity stunt, caught baseballs dropped from the top of the 708 ft (216 m) Cleveland Terminal Tower.

November

  • November 7 – George Bennette, 83, outfielder for multiple clubs in the Negro National League between 1921 and 1932.
  • November 17 – Dewey Creacy, 84, third- and second baseman who played 15 seasons (1924–1938) in the Negro leagues, mainly for the St. Louis Stars and Philadelphia Stars.
  • November 18 – Guido Rugo, 86, construction executive and one of the "Three Little Steam Shovels" as co-owner of the Boston Braves between 1944 and 1951.
  • November 20 – Leon Williams, 78, pitcher, outfielder and pinch hitter who got into a dozen contests for the 1926 Brooklyn Robins.
  • November 25 – Ival Goodman, 76, All-Star right fielder for the 1935–1944 Cincinnati Reds who led NL in triples twice.
  • November 28 – Maurice Young, 79, pitcher for the 1927 Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro National League in 1927.
  • November 30 – Chris Pelekoudas, 66, NL umpire from 1960 to 1975 who worked in two World Series and two NLCS.

December

  • December 1 – Ted Page, 81, outfielder for the Newark Eagles of the Eastern Colored League and Pittsburgh Crawfords of the Negro National League between 1926 and 1937; named an All-Star in 1933.
  • December 7 – Howie Reed, 47, pitcher for five teams from 1958 to 1971, including the 1965 World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers.
  • December 16 – Debs Garms, 77, outfielder and third baseman who won the 1940 NL batting title with the Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • December 19 – Bill Warwick, 87, catcher who appeared sparingly (23 career appearances) for 1921 Pirates and 1925–1926 St. Louis Cardinals; member of 1926 World Series champions.
  • December 20 – Walt "Cuckoo" Christensen, 85, longtime minor-league outfielder who hit .315 lifetime in 171 MLB games as a member of the 1926–1927 Cincinnati Reds.
  • December 20 – Gonzalo Márquez, 38, Venezuelan first baseman who batted .625 in the 1972 postseason as an Oakland Athletics rookie.
  • December 20 – Art McLarney, 76, shortstop who appeared in nine games for the 1932 New York Giants.
  • December 20 – Steve Slayton, 82, pitcher who played for the 1928 Boston Red Sox.
  • December 26 – Johnny Gill, 79, outfielder who played 118 career MLB games over six seasons between 1927 and 1936, most notably for the Chicago Cubs.
  • December 27 – Shirley Petway, 76, 1932 catcher/outfielder who played in the Negro leagues between 1932 and 1944.

References

  1. ^ "Detroit Tigers 4, Chicago White Sox 0". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-04-07.
  2. ^ "Cleveland Indians 8, Detroit Tigers 4". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-04-27.
  3. ^ "New York Mets 6, Philadelphia Phillies 2". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-04-27.
  4. ^ "Detroit Tigers 5, California Angels 1". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-05-24.
  5. ^ "Cincinnati Reds 2, Atlanta Braves 1". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-06-16.
  6. ^ "New York Yankees 7, Chicago White Sox 6". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-08-09.
  7. ^ "Detroit Tigers 3, Milwaukee Brewers 0". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-09-18.
  8. ^ "Detroit Tigers 4, New York Yankees 1". Baseball-Reference.com. 1984-09-23.


This page was last edited on 14 March 2024, at 19:46
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