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1980 Republican Party presidential primaries

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1980 Republican Party presidential primaries

← 1976 January 21 to June 3, 1980 1984 →
 
Ronald Reagan with cowboy hat 12-0071M edit.jpg
George H. W. Bush official CIA portrait.jpg
John Bayard Anderson (cropped).jpg
Candidate Ronald Reagan George H. W. Bush John Anderson
Home state California Texas Illinois
Contests won 44 6 + DC 0
Popular vote 7,709,793 3,070,033 1,572,174
Percentage 59.8% 23.8% 12.2%

Republican presidential primary results, 1980.svg
Red indicates a win by Reagan, blue a win by Bush.

Previous Republican nominee

Gerald Ford

Republican nominee

Ronald Reagan

The 1980 Republican presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Republican Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1980 presidential election. Two-term California governor Ronald Reagan was selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the Republican National Convention held from July 14 to July 17, 1980, in Detroit, Michigan.

Background

As the 1980 presidential election approached, incumbent Democratic president Jimmy Carter appeared vulnerable. High gas prices, economic stagflation, a renewed Cold War with the Soviet Union following the invasion of Afghanistan, and the Iran hostage crisis that developed when Iranian students seized the American embassy in Tehran all contributed to a general dissatisfaction with Carter's presidency; his job approval rating sank to below 20 percent in late-1979 as a result. Consequently, the president faced stiff Democratic primary challenges from Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy and California Governor Jerry Brown. A large field of Republican challengers also emerged.

Primary race

Ronald Reagan, who had narrowly lost the 1976 Republican nomination to President Gerald Ford, was the early odds-on favorite to win the nomination in 1980. He was so far ahead in the polls that campaign director John Sears decided on an "above the fray" strategy. He did not attend many of the multi-candidate forums and straw polls in the summer and fall of 1979.

George H. W. Bush, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and chairman of the Republican National Committee, did go to all the so-called "cattle calls", and began to come in first at a number of these events. Along with the top two, a number of other Republican politicians entered the race.

In January 1980, the Iowa Republicans decided to have a straw poll as a part of their caucuses for that year. Bush defeated Reagan by a small margin. Bush declared he had "the Big Mo", and with Reagan boycotting the Puerto Rico primary in deference to New Hampshire, Bush won the territory easily, giving him an early lead going into New Hampshire.

The Nashua debate, the 9th debate between Ronald Reagan (left) and George H. W. Bush (right)
The Nashua debate, the 9th debate between Ronald Reagan (left) and George H. W. Bush (right)

With the other candidates in single digits, the Nashua Telegraph offered to host a debate between Reagan and Bush. Worried that a newspaper-sponsored debate might violate electoral regulations, Reagan subsequently arranged to fund the event with his own campaign money, inviting the other candidates to participate at short notice. The Bush camp did not learn of Reagan's decision to include the other candidates until the debate was due to commence. Bush refused to participate, which led to an impasse on the stage. As Reagan attempted to explain his decision, the editor of the Nashua Telegraph ordered the sound man to mute Reagan's microphone. A visibly angry Reagan responded, "I am paying for this microphone, Mr. Green!" [sic] (referring to the editor Jon Breen).[1][2][3] Eventually the other candidates agreed to leave, and the debate proceeded between Reagan and Bush. Reagan's quote was often repeated as "I paid for this microphone!" and dominated news coverage of the event; Reagan sailed to an easy win in New Hampshire.[4]

Ronald Reagan delivering his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention in Detroit, Michigan, on July 17, 1980.
Ronald Reagan delivering his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention in Detroit, Michigan, on July 17, 1980.

Lee Bandy, a writer for the South Carolina newspaper The State stated that heading into the South Carolina primary, political operative Lee Atwater worked to engineer a victory for Reagan: "Lee Atwater figured that Connally was their biggest threat here in South Carolina. So Lee leaked a story to me that John Connally was trying to buy the black vote. Well, that story got out, thanks to me, and it probably killed Connally. He spent $10 million for one delegate. Lee saved Ronald Reagan's candidacy."[5]

Reagan swept the South, and although he lost five more primaries to Bush—including the Massachusetts primary in which he came in third place behind John B. Anderson—the former governor had a lock on the nomination very early in the season. Reagan said he would always be grateful to the people of Iowa for giving him "the kick in the pants" he needed.

Reagan was an adherent to a policy known as supply-side economics, which argues that economic growth can be most effectively created using incentives for people to produce (supply) goods and services, such as adjusting income tax and capital gains tax rates. Accordingly, Reagan promised an economic revival that would benefit all sectors of the population. He said that cutting tax rates would actually increase tax revenues because the lower rates would cause people to work harder as they would be able to keep more of their money. Reagan also called for a drastic cut in "big government" and pledged to deliver a balanced budget for the first time since 1969. In the primaries Bush called Reagan's economic policy "voodoo economics" because it promised to lower taxes and increase revenues at the same time.

Candidates

Nominee

Candidate Most recent position Home state Campaign

Withdrawal date

Popular

vote

Contests won Running mate
Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan with cowboy hat 12-0071M edit.jpg
Governor of California
(1967–1975)
Flag-map of California.svg
California
Ronald Reagan 1980 bumper sticker 2014BSPresLine3Click-1x4.jpg

(CampaignPositions)
Secured nomination: May 26, 1980
7,709,793
(59.79%)
44 George Bush

Withdrew during primaries

Candidate Most recent position Home state Campaign

Withdrawal date

Popular vote Contests won
George Bush
George H. W. Bush official CIA portrait.jpg
11th Director of Central Intelligence
(1976–1977)
Texas

Texas
Bush80.gif

Withdrew: May 26
(endorsed Ronald Reagan, nominated for Vice President)
3,070,033

(23.81%)

8

CT, DC, IA, ME, MA, MI, PA, PR

John Anderson
JohnAnderson.png
U.S. Representative
from Illinois
(1961–1981)
Flag map of Illinois.svg

Illinois
Anderson logo.png

Withdrew: April 24

(ran as independent)
1,572,174

(12.19%)

None
Howard Baker
Howard Baker photo.jpg
U.S. Senator
from Tennessee

(1967–1985)
Tennessee

Tennessee
Howard Baker presidential campaign, 1980 (logo).png

Withdrew: March 5
(endorsed Ronald Reagan)
181,153

(1.41%)

None
Phil Crane
Philip M. Crane 94th Congress 1975.jpg
U.S. Representative
from Illinois
(1969–2005)
Flag map of Illinois.svg

Illinois
Phil Crane presidential campaign, 1980.png

Withdrew: April 17
[6]
(endorsed Ronald Reagan)
97,793

(0.76%)

None
John Connally
John Connally (cropped).jpg
61st Secretary of the Treasury
(1971–1972)
Texas

Texas
John Connally presidential campaign, 1980.png

Withdrew: March 9
(endorsed Ronald Reagan)
82,625

(0.64%)

None
Harold Stassen
Harold Stassen 1980.jpg
25th Governor of Minnesota
(1939–1943)
Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania
[data unknown/missing] 25,425

(0.20%)

None
Bob Dole
Bob Dole bioguide.jpg
U.S. Senator
from Kansas
(1969–1996)
Kansas

Kansas
Bobdole80 transparent.gif

Withdrew: March 15
7,204

(0.06%)

None
Benjamin Fernandez[7] None

Withdrew before primaries

Declined to run

The following potential candidates declined to run for the Republican nomination in 1980.[8][9]

Results

Statewide

Raw Vote Totals Delegate Estimate
Date Jurisdiction Dels Anderson Baker Bush Reagan Others Totals Anderson Baker Bush Reagan Others
January 21 Iowa 38 4,585 16,216 33,530 31,348 20,372 106,051 0 6 13 12 8
February 2 Arkansas 22 State Convention 0 0 8 9 5
February 17 Puerto Rico 20 0 68,934 111,940 0 5,497 186,371 0 8 12 0 0
February 22 Alaska 20 0 34 818 1,789 459 3,100 0 0 5 12 3
February 26 New Hampshire 23 14,458 18,943 33,443 72,983 6,707 146,534 0 3 6 13 0
March 4 Massachusetts 46 122,987 19,366 124,365 115,334 18,771 400,823 16 0 16 15
Vermont 20 19,030 8,055 14,226 19,720 4,580 65,611 6 3 5 6 0
March 8 South Carolina 28 0 753 21,458 78,854 42,287 143,352 0 0 4 15 8
March 11 Alabama 31 0 1,963 53,232 146,042 7,564 208,800 0 0 8 23 0
Florida 55 56,447 6,294 185,527 345,093 20,224 613,585 0 0 19 36 0
Georgia 40 16,853 1,571 25,293 146,500 9,953 200,170 0 0 6 34 0
March 18 Illinois 103 415,193 7,051 124,057 547,355 36,425 1,130,081 39 0 12 52 0
March 25 Connecticut 38 40,354 2,446 70,367 61,735 7,382 182,284 9 0 16 14 0
New York 127 Votes cast for delegate slates by CD, not for candidates 1 0 8 71 43
April 1 Kansas 34 51,493 3,603 35,408 177,988 14,147 282,639 7 0 5 23 0
Wisconsin 37 248,623 3,298 276,164 364,898 9,919 902,902 10 0 11 15 0
April 5 Louisiana 34 0 0 7,818 31,212 2,653 41,683 0 0 7 27 0
April 19 Maine 23 0 0 17 3 3
April 22 Pennsylvania 85 0 30,848 626,759 527,916 26,311 1,211,834 0 0 46 39 0
May 3 Arizona 31 0 0 0 31 0
Missouri 40 0 0 0 27 13
Oklahoma 38 0 0 0 34 4
Texas 82 0 0 250,219 268,169 8,112 526,500 0 0 40 42 0
May 6 Washington, D.C. 13 2,025 0 4,973 0 531 7,529 4 0 9 0
Indiana 56 56,342 0 92,955 419,556 0 568,853 0 0 10 46
North Carolina 43 8,542 2,543 36,631 113,854 6,821 168,391 0 0 10 33
Tennessee 34 8.722 10 35,274 144,625 6,589 195,210 0 0 7 27
May 13 Maryland 45 16,244 0 68,389 80,557 2,113 167,303 0 0 21 24
Nebraska 27 11,879 0 31,380 155,995 2,882 202,136 0 0 5 22
May 20 Michigan 85 48,947 0 341,998 189,184 15,047 595,176 0 0 55 30
Oregon 31 32,118 0 109,210 170,449 2,324 314,101 3 0 11 17
May 27 Idaho 23 13,130 0 5,416 111,868 4,465 134,879 0 0 0 23
Kentucky 31 4,791 0 6,869 78,601 5,068 95,329 0 0 0 31
Nevada 20 0 0 3,078 39,352 4,965 47,395 0 0 0 18 2
June 3 California 171 349,315 0 125,113 2,057,923 31,707 2,564,058 25 0 0 146 0
Mississippi 25 0% 8% 89% 0% 0 0 0 25 0
Montana 23 0 0 7,665 68,744 3,014 79,423 0 0 0 23 0
New Jersey 70 0 0 45,447 225,959 4,571 275,977 0 0 12 58 0
New Mexico 23 7,171 0 5,892 37,982 8,501 59,546 3 0 0 16 4
Ohio 79 0 0 164,485 615,233 0 779,719 0 0 17 62 0
Rhode Island 16 0 0 962 3,839 503 5,304 0 0 3 13 0
South Dakota 23 0 0 3,691 72,861 6,353 82,905 0 0 0 23 0
West Virginia 22 0 0 19,509 115,407 3,100 138,016 0 0 3 19 0
2,152 1,549,249 191,935 3,102,808 7,637,219 541,342 12,830,618 128 20 637 1,222 99

Nationwide

Primaries, total popular vote:[11]

The Republican National Convention was held in Detroit, Michigan, from July 14 to July 17, 1980.

Endorsements

Ronald Reagan

George H.W. Bush

John B. Anderson

Howard Baker

John B. Connally, Jr.

Phil Crane

See also

References

  1. ^ "Reagan's Nashua Moment"
  2. ^ "Nation: We Were Sandbagged". Time. 10 March 1980.
  3. ^ "Molloy Sound and Video Contractors: Articles (1/1/11)". Molloysoundandvideo.com. 2000-02-10. Retrieved 2011-01-22.
  4. ^ Dunham, Richard (20 October 2009). "New book tells inside story of pivotal Bush-Reagan debate in Nashua". The Houston Chronicle.
  5. ^ Forbes, Stefan (2008). "Transcript – Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story". PBS Frontline.
  6. ^ "Reagan Maneuvering His Bandwagon," Washington Post, April 18, 1980.
  7. ^ UPI (1978-11-30). "Presidential race gets second entry". Lodi News-Sentinel. Google News Archive. Retrieved 2012-12-06
  8. ^ Sidey, Hugh (29 May 1978). "The Presidency: Roses with a Touch of Ragweed". Time.
  9. ^ "Republicans: There's Life in the Old Party Yet". time. 15 November 1976.
  10. ^ Clymer, Adam (March 8, 1979). "Backers of Reagan Open His Campaign". New York Times. p. A18. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  11. ^ "US President - R Primaries Race - Feb 17, 1980". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 2012-02-03.
  12. ^ "1980 New Hampshire Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  13. ^ "1980 Vermont Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  14. ^ "1980 Kansas Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  15. ^ "1980 Ohio Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  16. ^ "1980 Ohio Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  17. ^ "1980 Massachusetts Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  18. ^ "1980 Massachusetts Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  19. ^ "1980 Massachusetts Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  20. ^ "1980 Ohio Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  21. ^ "1980 Ohio Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  22. ^ "1980 Massachusetts Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  23. ^ "1980 Massachusetts Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  24. ^ "1980 Massachusetts Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  25. ^ "1980 Vermont Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  26. ^ "1980 Kansas Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  27. ^ "1980 New Hampshire Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  28. ^ "1980 New Hampshire Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  29. ^ "1980 New Hampshire Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  30. ^ "1980 Vermont Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  31. ^ "1980 South Carolina Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  32. ^ "1980 Georgia Republican Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
This page was last edited on 15 October 2020, at 14:23
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