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1974 Major League Baseball season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1974 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 4 – October 17, 1974
Number of games162
Number of teams24
Draft
Top draft pickBill Almon
Picked bySan Diego Padres
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Jeff Burroughs (TEX)
NL: Steve Garvey (LA)
Postseason
AL championsOakland Athletics
  AL runners-upBaltimore Orioles
NL championsLos Angeles Dodgers
  NL runners-upPittsburgh Pirates
World Series
ChampionsOakland Athletics
  Runners-upLos Angeles Dodgers
World Series MVPRollie Fingers (OAK)
 MLB seasons

The 1974 Major League Baseball season. The Oakland Athletics won their third consecutive World Series, defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers four games to one.

Two notable personal milestones were achieved during the 1974 season. The first came on April 8, when Hank Aaron of the Atlanta Braves blasted his 715th career home run, breaking the all-time career home run mark of 714 set by Babe Ruth. Aaron would finish his career with 755 home runs, a record that would stand until Barry Bonds broke it in 2007. The second milestone came on September 10, when the St. Louis Cardinals' Lou Brock stole his 105th base off pitcher Dick Ruthven and catcher Bob Boone of the Philadelphia Phillies. This broke the single-season stolen base record of 104, set by Maury Wills in 1962. Brock stole 118 bases, a record that would stand until 1982, when Rickey Henderson stole 130.

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
                 
East Baltimore 1  
West Oakland 3  
    AL Oakland 4
  NL Los Angeles 1
East Pittsburgh 1
West Los Angeles 3  

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Rod Carew MIN .364 Ralph Garr ATL .353
HR Dick Allen CHW 32 Mike Schmidt PHI 36
RBI Jeff Burroughs TEX 118 Johnny Bench CIN 129
Wins Catfish Hunter OAK
Ferguson Jenkins TEX
25 Phil Niekro ATL
Andy Messersmith LA
20
ERA Catfish Hunter OAK 2.49 Buzz Capra ATL 2.28
SO Nolan Ryan CAL 367 Steve Carlton PHI 240
SV Terry Forster CHW 24 Mike Marshall LA 21
SB Billy North OAK 54 Lou Brock STL 118

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
Los Angeles Dodgers[1] 102 7.4% 2,632,474 23.2% 32,500
Cincinnati Reds[2] 98 -1.0% 2,164,307 7.3% 26,394
St. Louis Cardinals[3] 86 6.2% 1,838,413 16.8% 22,696
Philadelphia Phillies[4] 80 12.7% 1,808,648 22.5% 22,329
New York Mets[5] 71 -13.4% 1,722,209 -9.9% 21,262
Boston Red Sox[6] 84 -5.6% 1,556,411 5.1% 19,215
New York Yankees[7] 89 11.3% 1,273,075 0.9% 15,717
Detroit Tigers[8] 72 -15.3% 1,243,080 -27.9% 15,347
Texas Rangers[9] 84 47.4% 1,193,902 74.0% 14,924
Kansas City Royals[10] 77 -12.5% 1,173,292 -12.8% 14,485
Chicago White Sox[11] 80 3.9% 1,149,596 -11.7% 14,019
Cleveland Indians[12] 77 8.5% 1,114,262 81.1% 13,756
Pittsburgh Pirates[13] 88 10.0% 1,110,552 -15.9% 13,711
Houston Astros[14] 81 -1.2% 1,090,728 -21.8% 13,466
San Diego Padres[15] 60 0.0% 1,075,399 75.8% 13,277
Montreal Expos[16] 79 0.0% 1,019,134 -18.3% 12,739
Chicago Cubs[17] 66 -14.3% 1,015,378 -24.9% 12,536
Atlanta Braves[18] 88 15.8% 981,085 22.5% 12,112
Baltimore Orioles[19] 91 -6.2% 962,572 0.4% 11,884
Milwaukee Brewers[20] 76 2.7% 955,741 -12.5% 11,799
California Angels[21] 68 -13.9% 917,269 -13.3% 11,324
Oakland Athletics[22] 90 -4.3% 845,693 -15.5% 10,441
Minnesota Twins[23] 82 1.2% 662,401 -27.0% 8,078
San Francisco Giants[24] 72 -18.2% 519,987 -37.7% 6,420

Events

On August 30, Texas Rangers player Dave Nelson steals three bases – 2nd, 3rd and home in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians.[25]

References

  1. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. ^ "Strange and Unusual Plays". www.retrosheet.org. Retrieved June 13, 2012.

External links

This page was last edited on 8 October 2020, at 16:00
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