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1973 Alaska's at-large congressional district special election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1973 Alaska's at-large congressional district special election

← 1972 March 6, 1973 1974 →

Alaska's at-large congressional district
 
Don Young 1973.jpg
Nominee Don Young Emil Notti
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 35,044 33,123
Percentage 51.41% 48.59%

Representative At-large before election

Nick Begich
Democratic

Elected Representative At-large

Don Young
Republican

The 1973 Alaska's at-large congressional district special election was held on March 6, 1973, to elect the United States Representative from Alaska's at-large congressional district. Incumbent Democratic Representative Nick Begich had won reelection in 1972, but had gone missing shortly before the election.

Begich's seat was declared vacant by a jury and a special election was ordered by Governor William A. Egan. Don Young, who had lost to Begich in 1972, won the Republican nomination without opposition while Emil Notti defeated Chancy Croft and Pegge Begich for the Democratic nomination. In the general election Young defeated Notti.

Background

Representative Nick Begich disappeared while traveling on an airplane with House Majority Leader Hale Boggs on October 16, 1972, and was never found. However, despite his disappearance Begich defeated Don Young in the House of Representatives election.[1] On November 24, the United States Air Force announced that it would suspend the air search for Begich and Boggs after no traces of the missing plane had been found after 3,600 hours of searching had covered 325,000 square miles.[2]

Following his defeat Young asked Governor William A. Egan to call a special legislative session to speed up the process of the special election to fill Begich's vacant seat. According to Alaskan law a special election must be called by the governor within sixty to ninety days after a vacancy is declared.[3] Three petitions calling for a presumptive death hearing for Begich were filed in the Juneau District Court, and was later transferred to Anchorage.[4][5] On December 12, the six-member jury deliberated for twenty minutes before ruling that Begich and two other people onboard the plane were presumably dead.[6]

On December 29, Governor Egan announced that the special election would be held on March 6, 1973.[7]

Democratic nomination

On November 7, 1972, after voting in the 1972 election, Pegge Begich, the wife of Nick Begich, stated that she was open to running in a special election to fill her husband's vacant seat.[8] Peggy later announced that she would seek the Democratic nomination "if and when a vacancy occurs".[9] On December 20, she stated that she would spend $40,000 to $60,000 on the campaign.[10]

The Anchorage Daily News released a poll of 22 of the 29 members of the Democratic State Central Committee. Eleven members supported state Senator Chancy Croft, eight were undecided, and three supported Pegge Begich.[11] On December 7, Croft announced that he would seek the Democratic nomination for the special election.[12] On January 5, 1973, Emil Notti, chairman of the Alaska Democratic Party, announced that he would seek the Democratic nomination for the special election.[13]

Fifty-one Democrats filed a lawsuit on December 5, to prevent the Democratic State Central Committee from choosing the special election candidate at a meeting. On December 7, Judge Edmond W. Burke granted a preliminary injunction while Notti filed an appeal.[14][15] On December 28, the Alaska Supreme Court ruled against Notti's appeal which forced the Democratic Party to select its candidate at a convention. The court ruled that a committee meeting to select the candidate would be a violation of the principle of one man, one vote.[16][17] Another attempt was made to appeal the ruling prohibiting the selection of a candidate at a committee meeting, but the courts ruled in favor of the 51 Democrats again on January 10, 1973.[18]

On January 14, 1973, the Democratic state convention was held at the Gold Rush Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Notti won on the third ballot with 108.5 delegate votes against Croft's 90.4 votes.[19] On January 17, Notti selected Begich to serve as the chairwoman of his campaign.[20] Following the convention Democratic National committeeman Cliff Warren announced that he would drop his appeal to the ruling baring a committee meeting to select the party's special election candidate.[21]

Candidates

Speculated

Declined

Results

1973 Alaska at-large congressional district Democratic convention third ballot[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Emil Notti 108.5 54.55%
Democratic Chancy Croft 90.4 45.45%
Total votes 198.9 100.00%

Republican nomination

Former Governor Keith Harvey Miller, Anchorage Mayor George M. Sullivan, former Commissioner of Natural Resources Tom Kelley, and state senators Clifford Groh and Lowell Thomas Jr., who had been speculated as possible candidates for the Republican nomination in the special election, announced that they would support Don Young for the Republican nomination. However, Sullivan and Groh stated that they would be interested in running if Young were to withdraw.[24]

On December 2, 1972, the Alaska Republican Central Committee, with eight committee members present and eight committee members voting by proxy, voted unanimously to give Young the Republican nomination for the special election.[25]

On December 13, the Republican Party filed a lawsuit to receive clarification on Judge Edmond W. Burke's ruling that the Democratic candidate for the special election could only be nominated at a convention and not by the Democratic Central Committee.[26] The Alaskan government filed a motion to dismiss the Republican lawsuit stating that there was no conflict for the court to resolve, and on December 29, Judge Everett W. Hepp dismissed the lawsuit. Jack Coghill, the chairman of the Alaska Republican Party, stated that as the lawsuit was dismissed that the Republicans would not need to hold a convention to select their special election candidate as their method of selection for Young was not contested.[27][28]

Candidates

Speculated

General election

Don Young's congressional campaign logo
Don Young's congressional campaign logo
Emil Notti's congressional campaign logo
Emil Notti's congressional campaign logo

On January 9, 1973, Don Young filed to run in the special election, and stated that environmental issues and how Alaska utilizes its natural resources would be the major issues during the campaign. Young also stated that he would not resign from the state senate, but he would limit campaigning to the weekends when the state legislature was not in session.[29][30] Jack Coghill served as the chairman of Young's campaign.[31]

Young stated that he was promised seats on the House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries and the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs by the Republican leadership. Young showed a telegram signed by House Minority Leader Gerald Ford showing the promise. Emil Notti stated that Speaker of the House Carl Albert and House Majority Leader Tip O'Neill promised him a seat on the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.[32]

On March 6, Young narrowly defeated Notti by 2,000 votes with 35,044 (51.41%) to 33,123 (48.59%) votes.[33] Young was inaugurated into the House of Representatives on March 14. He would continue to be reelected and became the longest serving Republican member of the House of Representatives in 2013.[34][35]

Results

1973 Alaska at-large congressional district special election[33]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Don Young 35,044 51.41% +7.65%
Democratic Emil Notti 33,123 48.59% -7.65%
Total votes 68,167 100.00%

Endorsements

Begich Endorsements
Organizations
  • Democratic Southeast District Committee[36]
Notti Endorsements
Organizations
  • Fairbanks Central Labor Council[37]
Young Endorsements
Organizations
  • Alaska Medical Political Action Committee[38]
  • Kenai Natives Association[39]
Federal officials
State officials
State legislators
Local officials

References

  1. ^ "Five people have won election to Congress, despite being dead". October 1, 2014. Archived from the original on October 10, 2016.
  2. ^ "Air Force suspends Begich, Boggs hunt". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 24, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Young presses for Egan to call legislative session". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 10, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "State asks death ruling". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 29, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Begich hearing moved to Anchorage". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 29, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Jury rules quickly following hearing". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 12, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Young pleased to have date for special election decided". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 30, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Mrs. Begich would consider running for husband's seat". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 9, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ a b "Pegge Begich decides to run". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 14, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Pegge Begich promises 'real fight' for House". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 21, 1972. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Demo poll gives lead to Croft". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 20, 1972. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ a b "Croft announces House candidacy". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 9, 1972. p. 14. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ a b "Notti in Demo race for House". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 5, 1973. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Injunction granted in Demos' lawsuit". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 8, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Coghill explains suit to name Young choice". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 12, 1972. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Decision due today on Demo's candidate". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 27, 1972. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Democrats will have to convene". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 29, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Democrat committee ban stays". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 11, 1973. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ a b "Notti Demos' nominee". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 15, 1973. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Pegge Begich to head House campaign for Notti". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 18, 1973. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Democratic committeeman to drop candidate suit". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 16, 1973. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ a b c d "Rader eyeing House race". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 17, 1972. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ a b "Boucher denies House bid". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 21, 1972. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Republicans throw support to Young". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. November 22, 1972. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ a b "GOP unanimous for Young". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 4, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "GOP sues for Young". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 14, 1972. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "State requests dismissal of GOP test suit here". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 23, 1972. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Republicans will keep candidate Don Young". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 2, 1973. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "Young forecasts environment issue". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 4, 1973. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "Young formally candidate". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 10, 1973. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Young formally candidate". Daily Sitka Sentinel. February 15, 1973. p. 6. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "Young, Notti say committee promised". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. January 20, 1973. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ a b "Election Results" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-03-31.
  34. ^ "Don Young: 46 years in an office he never expected to win". March 6, 2019. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020.
  35. ^ "Alaska's Don Young longest serving Republican in House". October 31, 2013. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020.
  36. ^ "Southeast Demos back Mrs. Begich". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. December 30, 1972. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Emil Notti endorsed by Central Labor Council". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. February 2, 1973. p. 1. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "State physicians support Young". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. February 9, 1973. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Kenai natives support Young". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. February 10, 1973. p. 5. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "Stevens view legislation for pipeline construction". Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. February 12, 1973. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
This page was last edited on 12 December 2020, at 21:02
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