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1972 United States Senate election in Louisiana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1972 United States Senate election in Louisiana

← 1966 November 7, 1972 1978 →
 
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Nominee J. Bennett Johnston John McKeithen Ben Toledano
Party Democratic Independent Republican
Popular vote 598,987 250,161 206,846
Percentage 55.21% 23.06% 19.07%

U.S. Senator before election

Elaine Edwards
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

J. Bennett Johnston
Democratic

The 1972 United States Senate election in Louisiana was held on November 9, 1972.

Former State Representative J. Bennett Johnston was elected to the Senate to succeed First Lady of Louisiana Elaine Edwards, who had been appointed by her husband on an interim basis following the death of Senator Allen Ellender. Following Johnston's victory in the general election, Elaine Edwards resigned and Governor Edwin Edwards appointed Johnston, so that he could gain seniority in the Senate.

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Transcription

Contents

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Deceased

Senator Ellender died July 27, a few weeks before the August 11 primary, but his name remained on the ballot.

Results

1972 Democratic U.S. Senate primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic J. Bennett Johnston 623,078 79.44%
Democratic Frank T. Allen 88,198 11.25%
Democratic Allen Ellender (inc., deceased) 73,088 9.32%
Total votes 784,364 100.00%

Republican primary

Candidates

Withdrew

  • Charles M. McLean

Results

Following Ellender's death, the Republican Party replaced presumptive nominee Charles McLean with attorney and New Orleans mayoral candidate Ben Toledano. Toledano was unopposed for the Republican nomination.

Independents and third parties

American Independent

Independent

Following Ellender's death, former Governor John McKeithen joined the race as an independent candidate. He initially hoped to enter the race as a Democrat but was barred by party leaders from entering the primary. He campaigned against the Democratic Party's presidential nominee, George McGovern.[3]

General election

Campaign

The sudden death of Ellender and the independent candidacy of former Governor McKeithen made this a rare competitive general election in Louisiana. The Republican Party had not seriously contested one of Louisiana's Senate seats since Reconstruction, and Republican leaders believed McKeithen's presence in the race could split the Democratic vote.[3]

McKeithen ran a populist, agrarian campaign against Johnston, citing his own investment in the state's agriculture industry and attempting to portray Johnston as an urban elitist. All three major candidates supported President Nixon's handling of the Vietnam War.[3]

Results

General election results[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic J. Bennett Johnston 598,987 55.21% Decrease44.79
Independent John J. McKeithen 250,161 23.06% N/A
Republican Ben Toledano 206,846 19.07% Increase19.07
American Independent Hall M. Lyons 28,910 2.67% Increase2.67
Total votes 1,084,904 100.00%

See also

References

  1. ^ "Johnston Wins in Louisiana". The New York Times. 20 August 1972. Retrieved 16 August 2019.
  2. ^ "1972 US Senate – D Primary". OurCampaigns. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Reed, Roy (30 September 1972). "THE 1972 CAMPAIGN". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 August 2019.
  4. ^ "LA US Senate". OurCampaigns. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
This page was last edited on 29 November 2019, at 07:13
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