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1971 in fine arts of the Soviet Union

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The year 1971 was marked by many events that left an imprint on the history of Soviet and Russian Fine Arts.

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  • Are we all Cockneys now? (UCL Festival of the Arts)
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Transcription

We're here at St Mary-le-Bow Cheapside. Traditionally, the Cockney was somebody born within the sound of Bow bells - that's one definition that goes back quite a long way. But some of our modern notions about what the Cockney might be are not held in the early 19th century and in the Medieval and Shakespearian period. We tend to think of the Cockney nowadays as being a badge of distinction, something that people are proud of, but also of it being kind of specifically kind of working-class - barrow boys from the East End. What's interesting about the term, I suppose, is the way in which for most of its history, up until the mid Victorian period, it didn't really have that flavour. It was much more a term of abuse for people who were thought not to be gentleman, who were thought to be sort of 'misshapen children of the city'. A Cockney, literally, etymologically if you like, is a cock's egg, so in other words, an impossibility, a pampered and effeminate child of the city, and for a long time that was the flavour of the term. So in calling somebody Cockney, you're identifying them not so much as working-class, but somebody who didn't really fit anywhere, and who, especially if you took them out of the city, was simply a joke. What I became interested in is the way in which this term was being used not only to describe Londoners in the early 19th century, but actually the new suburban suburbanites, as it were, of the early industrial metropolis. The term had a special sort of intensity, a special sort of venom, if you like, because London was expanding so quickly, and lots of those people who formerly used to live in London started living in the suburbs - Camden Town, Dulwich, even Hampstead, and the term 'Cockney' was often being used by Conservatives to describe a whole new belt, as it were, of the social order; not the working-class specifically, but the lower-middle-class - the kind of class from which Dickens emerged; Leigh Hunt, Keats and so on. So what I became interested in is the way in which this term is being used, rather as we might use an 'Essex man', an 'Essex woman' today, as a way of indicating a new kind of species of being, a species of being that you can't quite put in any particular category, that seem neither to belong in the middle-class or in the plebeian class, and that people don't quite understand, that they're afraid of in a way, that they're the new citizens on the block. I suppose the main figures of the study, the kind of people I'm interested in are the poets; Leigh Hunt, John Keats most notably, because they are the people who really attract quite a lot of Cockney criticism for the way in which they write about nature. They write about nature, according to the Conservatives, like people who only know it from books, or only know it from their private gardens, in suburbs such as Hampstead or Camden Town. So they're not writing about the grand rolling mountains and lakes that Wordsworth liked to write about, or Walter Scott, they're writing about these little feminised bowers, domestic bowers in which certain kinds of romantic or sexual (...) might take place, fanciful places, places in which you might feather and animate your own little private mythology, your own private world. So, quite often when critics are accusing these guys of being Cockney, they're accusing them of being effeminate, strange, fanciful, out-of-touch. They're attacking a kind of poetry which seems made-up and meant for the domestic. I suppose for me, it became interesting as a way of thinking about not only the growth in suburbanism in the early 19th century, but also, in a way, the conditions in which most of us now live. It gives a little sign, as it were, about the Cockney. They're our little ancestors of modernity - they're what most of us have now become.

Contents

Events

Exhibition Catalog
Exhibition Catalog

Deaths

  • January 23 — Vasily Vikulov (Russian: Викулов Василий Иванович), Russian soviet painter (born 1904).
  • May 8 — Lev Britanishsky (Russian: Британишский Лев Романович), Russian soviet painter and graphic artist (born 1897).
  • August 20 — Alexander Samokhvalov (Russian: Самохвалов Александр Николаевич), Russian soviet painter, graphic artist, book illustrator, Honored Art worker of the Russian Federation (born 1894).
  • October 12 — Alexander Segal (Russian: Сегал Александр Израилевич), Russian soviet painter and theatre artist (born 1905).
  • October 19 — Maria Fedoricheva (Russian: Федоричева Мария Александровна), Russian soviet painter (born 1895).
  • December 9 — Sergey Konenkov (Russian: Конёнков Сергей Тимофеевич), Russian soviet sculptor, People's Artist of the USSR, Hero of Socialist Labour, Stalin Prize winner (born 1874).
  • December 19 — Elena Ivanova-Eberling (Russian: Иванова-Эберлинг Елена Александровна), Russian soviet painter (born 1905).

Gallery of 1971

See also

References

  1. ^ «Наш современник». Каталог выставки произведений ленинградских художников 1971 года. Л., Художник РСФСР, 1972.
  2. ^ «Наш современник». Каталог выставки произведений ленинградских художников 1971 года. Л., Художник РСФСР, 1972.
  3. ^ Богданов А. О нашем современнике // Вечерний Ленинград, 1971, 5 апреля.
  4. ^ Осенняя традиционная // Ленинградская правда, 1971, 11 декабря.
  5. ^ Богданов А. Ярче показывать жизнь // Вечерний Ленинград, 1971, 21 декабря.
  6. ^ Вьюнова И. Мерой времени // Ленинградская правда, 1971, 31 декабря.

Sources

  • Богданов А. О нашем современнике // Вечерний Ленинград, 1971, 5 апреля.
  • Осенняя традиционная // Ленинградская правда, 1971, 11 декабря.
  • Слава русского искусства // Ленинградская правда, 1971, 11 декабря.
  • Богданов А. Ярче показывать жизнь // Вечерний Ленинград, 1971, 21 декабря.
  • Вьюнова И. Мерой времени // Ленинградская правда, 1971, 31 декабря.
  • Весенняя выставка произведений ленинградских художников 1971 года. Каталог. Л., Художник РСФСР, 1972.
  • «Наш современник». Каталог выставки произведений ленинградских художников 1971 года. Л., Художник РСФСР, 1972.
  • Каталог Осенней выставки произведений ленинградских художников 1971 года. Л., Художник РСФСР, 1973.
  • Artists of Peoples of the USSR. Biography Dictionary. Vol. 1. Moscow, Iskusstvo, 1970.
  • Artists of Peoples of the USSR. Biography Dictionary. Vol. 2. Moscow, Iskusstvo, 1972.
  • Directory of Members of Union of Artists of USSR. Volume 1,2. Moscow, Soviet Artist Edition, 1979.
  • Directory of Members of the Leningrad branch of the Union of Artists of Russian Federation. Leningrad, Khudozhnik RSFSR, 1980.
  • Artists of Peoples of the USSR. Biography Dictionary. Vol. 4 Book 1. Moscow, Iskusstvo, 1983.
  • Directory of Members of the Leningrad branch of the Union of Artists of Russian Federation. - Leningrad: Khudozhnik RSFSR, 1987.
  • Artists of peoples of the USSR. Biography Dictionary. Vol. 4 Book 2. - Saint Petersburg: Academic project humanitarian agency, 1995.
  • Link of Times: 1932 - 1997. Artists - Members of Saint Petersburg Union of Artists of Russia. Exhibition catalogue. - Saint Petersburg: Manezh Central Exhibition Hall, 1997.
  • Matthew C. Bown. Dictionary of 20th Century Russian and Soviet Painters 1900-1980s. - London: Izomar, 1998.
  • Vern G. Swanson. Soviet Impressionism. - Woodbridge, England: Antique Collectors' Club, 2001.
  • Время перемен. Искусство 1960—1985 в Советском Союзе. СПб., Государственный Русский музей, 2006.
  • Sergei V. Ivanov. Unknown Socialist Realism. The Leningrad School. - Saint-Petersburg: NP-Print Edition, 2007. - ISBN 5-901724-21-6, ISBN 978-5-901724-21-7.
  • Anniversary Directory graduates of Saint Petersburg State Academic Institute of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture named after Ilya Repin, Russian Academy of Arts. 1915 - 2005. - Saint Petersburg: Pervotsvet Publishing House, 2007.
This page was last edited on 22 September 2018, at 16:15
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