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1971 Philadelphia Phillies season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1971 Philadelphia Phillies
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)R. R. M. Carpenter, Jr.
General manager(s)John J. Quinn
Manager(s)Frank Lucchesi
Local televisionWPHL-TV
Local radioWCAU
(By Saam, Harry Kalas, Richie Ashburn)
< Previous season     Next season >

The 1971 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 89th season for the franchise in Philadelphia. The Phillies finished in sixth place in the National League East, with a record of 67–95.

Offseason

Regular season

On April 10, the Phillies officially opened Veterans Stadium, their new home park, with a 4–1 victory over the Montreal Expos.[4]

Harry Kalas was hired by the Phillies in 1971 to succeed Bill Campbell, and was the master of ceremonies at the 1971 opening of Veterans Stadium.

The Phillies played an exhibition game against the Reading Phillies on June 17, 1971, in Reading. The Phillies had signed second-round draft pick Mike Schmidt on June 11. Schmidt made his professional debut in the exhibition game in Reading. Schmidt played the whole game at shortstop for the Phillies and hit a game-winning home run against Reading. He was subsequently assigned to the Reading club, where he played the balance of the season.[5]

On June 25, Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder Willie Stargell hit what wound up being the longest home run in Veterans Stadium history off of pitcher Jim Bunning in a 14–4 Pirates win over the Phillies.[6] The spot where the ball landed was marked with a yellow star with a black "S" inside a white circle until Stargell's 2001 death, when the white circle was painted black.[7] The star remained until the stadium's 2004 demolition.

Season standings

NL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Pittsburgh Pirates 97 65 0.599 52–28 45–37
St. Louis Cardinals 90 72 0.556 7 45–36 45–36
Chicago Cubs 83 79 0.512 14 44–37 39–42
New York Mets 83 79 0.512 14 44–37 39–42
Montreal Expos 71 90 0.441 25½ 36–44 35–46
Philadelphia Phillies 67 95 0.414 30 34–47 33–48

Record vs. opponents

1971 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]
Team ATL CHC CIN HOU LAD MON NYM PHI PIT SD SF STL
Atlanta 5–7 9–9 9–9 9–9 7–5 7–5 8–4 4–8 11–7 7–11 6–6
Chicago 7–5 6–6 5–7 8–4 8–10 11–7 11–7 6–12 9–3 3–9 9–9
Cincinnati 9–9 6–6 5–13 7–11 7–5 8–4 5–7 5–7 10–8 9–9 8–4
Houston 9–9 7–5 13–5 8–10 4–8 5–7 8–4 4–8 10–8 9–9 2–10
Los Angeles 9–9 4–8 11–7 10–8 8–4 5–7 7–5 4–8 13–5 12–6 6–6
Montreal 5–7 10–8 5–7 8–4 4–8 9–9 6–12 7–11 6–5 7–5 4–14
New York 5–7 7–11 4–8 7–5 7–5 9–9 13–5 10–8 7–5 4–8 10–8
Philadelphia 4-8 7–11 2–10 3–9 5–7 6–10 5–13 6–12 4–8 6–6 7–11
Pittsburgh 8–4 12–6 7–5 8–4 8–4 11–7 8–10 12–6 9–3 3–9 11–7
San Diego 7–11 3–9 8–10 8–10 5–13 5–6 5–7 8–4 3–9 5–13 4–8
San Francisco 11–7 9–3 9–9 9–9 6–12 5–7 8–4 6–6 9–3 13–5 5–7
St. Louis 6–6 9–9 4–8 10–2 6–6 14–4 8–10 11–7 7–11 8–4 7–5


Notable transactions

Draft picks

Game log

Legend
  Phillies win
  Phillies loss
  Postponement
Bold Phillies team member
1971 Game Log[13]
Overall Record: 67–95
April (7–12)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
1 April 6 @ Pirates 2–4 Dock Ellis (1–0) Chris Short (0–1) None 39,712 0–1
2 April 8 @ Pirates 0–2 Luke Walker (1–0) Woodie Fryman (0–1) None 12,289 0–2
3 April 10 Expos 4–1 Jim Bunning (1–0) Bill Stoneman (0–1) Joe Hoerner (1) 55,352 1–2
4 April 11 Expos 11–4 Barry Lersch (1–0) Carl Morton (0–2) Bucky Brandon (1) 12,431 2–2
5 April 12 Pirates 3–4 (11) Dave Giusti (1–0) Dick Selma (0–1) None 19,469 2–3
6 April 13 Pirates 3–9 Nelson Briles (1–1) Chris Short (0–2) None 14,934 2–4
7 April 14 Pirates 6–5 Joe Hoerner (1–0) Mudcat Grant (0–1) Dick Selma (1) 8,379 3–4
8 April 16 Braves 7–8 Cecil Upshaw (3–0) Jim Bunning (1–1) None 15,099 3–5
9 April 17 Braves 2–6 Ron Reed (2–1) Barry Lersch (1–1) None 10,686 3–6
10 April 18 Braves 4–5 (10) Cecil Upshaw (4–0) Woodie Fryman (0–2) None 29,583 3–7
11 April 20 @ Expos 1–0 Chris Short (1–2) Ernie McAnally (0–1) None 11,634 4–7
April 21 @ Expos Postponed (rain);[14] Makeup: September 20 as a traditional double-header
12 April 22 @ Cardinals 2–5 Steve Carlton (4–0) Jim Bunning (1–2) None 8,411 4–8
13 April 23 @ Cardinals 8–6 Bucky Brandon (1–0) George Brunet (0–1) None 29,290 5–8
14 April 24 @ Cardinals 0–5 Jerry Reuss (2–2) Bill Champion (0–1) None 17,733 5–9
15 April 25 @ Cardinals 4–5 Frank Linzy (1–0) Woodie Fryman (0–3) None 13,122 5–10
16 April 26 @ Astros 2–1 Rick Wise (1–0) Tom Griffin (0–3) None 7,227 6–10
17 April 27 @ Astros 0–1 Larry Dierker (3–0) Jim Bunning (1–3) None 8,152 6–11
18 April 28 @ Astros 3–4 (10) Jim Ray (1–1) Bucky Brandon (1–1) None 8,576 6–12
19 April 30 @ Cubs 1–0 Chris Short (2–2) Milt Pappas (3–2) None 9,110 7–12
May (10–18)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
20 May 1 @ Cubs 4–7 Ferguson Jenkins (4–2) Rick Wise (1–1) None 16,618 7–13
21 May 2 @ Cubs 1–7 Bill Hands (3–3) Jim Bunning (1–4) None 9,585 7–14
22 May 3 Cardinals 3–2 Barry Lersch (2–1) Chris Zachary (0–1) Joe Hoerner (2) 9,102 8–14
23 May 4 Cardinals 3–7 Jerry Reuss (3–3) Chris Short (2–3) None 9,339 8–15
24 May 5 Cardinals 1–5 Reggie Cleveland (2–2) Joe Hoerner (1–1) None 10,184 8–16
May 6 Cardinals Postponed (rain);[15] Makeup: September 6 as a traditional double-header
25 May 7 Astros 1–8 Don Wilson (2–2) Jim Bunning (1–5) None 15,728 8–17
May 8 Astros Postponed (rain);[16] Makeup: July 27 as a traditional double-header
26 May 9 Astros 2–1 Barry Lersch (3–1) Jack Billingham (2–2) None 36,145 9–17
27 May 10 Cubs 0–3 Ferguson Jenkins (6–2) Chris Short (2–4) None 8,606 9–18
28 May 11 Cubs 2–6 Bill Hands (4–4) Rick Wise (1–2) None 9,873 9–19
29 May 12 Cubs 4–9 Ken Holtzman (2–4) Jim Bunning (1–6) None 8,518 9–20
30 May 14 @ Braves 2–3 Ron Reed (5–2) Barry Lersch (3–2) Cecil Upshaw (5) 10,164 9–21
31 May 15 @ Braves 2–6 Phil Niekro (3–3) Chris Short (2–5) None 4,976 9–22
32 May 16 @ Braves 4–3 Rick Wise (2–2) Pat Jarvis (0–5) Woodie Fryman (1) 16,990 10–22
33 May 17 @ Reds 3–2 Jim Bunning (2–6) Jim Merritt (0–5) Bucky Brandon (2) 7,089 11–22
34 May 18 @ Reds 3–4 Don Gullett (4–2) Barry Lersch (3–3) Joe Gibbon (3) 7,399 11–23
35 May 19 Mets 4–1 Chris Short (3–5) Jerry Koosman (3–2) None 19,159 12–23
36 May 20 Mets 1–0 Rick Wise (3–2) Gary Gentry (3–4) None 14,619 13–23
37 May 21 Reds 3–7 Tony Cloninger (2–1) Jim Bunning (2–7) Wayne Granger (5) 26,159 13–24
38 May 22 Reds 5–3 Barry Lersch (4–3) Jim Merritt (0–6) None 31,628 14–24
39 May 23 Reds 3–4 Don Gullett (5–2) Chris Short (3–6) Clay Carroll (6) 40,455 14–25
40 May 24 Reds 2–1 Rick Wise (4–2) Gary Nolan (3–4) None 13,614 15–25
41 May 25 @ Mets 4–5 (12) Danny Frisella (2–1) Jim Bunning (2–8) None 18,853 15–26
42 May 26 @ Mets 3–2 (12) Bucky Brandon (2–1) Tug McGraw (3–2) None 22,409 16–26
43 May 28 @ Dodgers 2–6 Al Downing (4–2) Chris Short (3–7) None 27,309 16–27
44 May 29 @ Dodgers 3–9 Bill Singer (3–9) Rick Wise (4–3) None 35,843 16–28
45 May 30 @ Dodgers 1–2 (12) Jim Brewer (3–1) Bucky Brandon (2–2) None 36,385 16–29
46 May 31 (1) @ Padres 3–1 Jim Bunning (3–8) Al Severinsen (1–1) Bucky Brandon (3) see 2nd game 17–29
47 May 31 (2) @ Padres 3–6 Bob Miller (2–1) Barry Lersch (4–4) None 7,458 17–30
June (14–15)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
48 June 2 @ Padres 0–6 Steve Arlin (2–7) Rick Wise (4–4) None 2,425 17–31
49 June 4 @ Giants 5–3 Chris Short (4–7) Gaylord Perry (6–3) Jim Bunning (1) 9,403 18–31
50 June 5 @ Giants 5–3 Joe Hoerner (2–1) Jerry Johnson (6–2) None 10,945 19–31
51 June 6 (1) @ Giants 1–0 Rick Wise (5–4) Steve Stone (4–4) None see 2nd game 20–31
52 June 6 (2) @ Giants 3–4 (12) Rich Robertson (2–2) Joe Hoerner (2–2) None 33,516 20–32
53 June 8 Dodgers 2–4 Bill Singer (4–9) Chris Short (4–8) Jim Brewer (5) 21,388 20–33
54 June 9 Dodgers 9–4 Ken Reynolds (1–0) Claude Osteen (6–4) Woodie Fryman (2) 19,004 21–33
55 June 10 Dodgers 4–2 Rick Wise (6–4) Don Sutton (4–6) None 19,493 22–33
56 June 11 Padres 1–2 Dave Roberts (5–5) Barry Lersch (4–5) None 19,260 22–34
57 June 12 Padres 3–0 Jim Bunning (4–8) Steve Arlin (2–9) Bucky Brandon (4) 17,039 23–34
58 June 13 Padres 8–9 Bob Miller (3–1) Bill Wilson (0–1) Dick Kelley (1) 35,343 23–35
59 June 14 Giants 9–4 Rick Wise (7–4) Gaylord Perry (6–5) None 16,118 24–35
60 June 15 Giants 0–6 Ron Bryant (6–3) Barry Lersch (4–6) None 21,588 24–36
61 June 16 Giants 6–3 Jim Bunning (5–8) Steve Stone (4–5) Joe Hoerner (3) 27,212 25–36
62 June 18 @ Mets 0–2 Gary Gentry (6–4) Ken Reynolds (1–1) None 45,428 25–37
63 June 19 @ Mets 5–6 (15) Danny Frisella (3–1) Bill Wilson (0–2) None 52,171 25–38
64 June 20 (1) @ Mets 6–7 Tug McGraw (5–3) Bucky Brandon (2–3) None see 2nd game 25–39
65 June 20 (2) @ Mets 9–7 (11) Woodie Fryman (1–3) Jim McAndrew (0–3) None 51,134 26–39
66 June 21 @ Reds 5–3 (12) Bucky Brandon (3–3) Jim Merritt (0–9) None 11,683 27–39
67 June 22 @ Reds 1–6 Gary Nolan (5–7) Ken Reynolds (1–2) None 13,226 27–40
68 June 23 @ Reds 4–0 Rick Wise (8–4) Ross Grimsley (4–3) None 13,329 28–40
69 June 24 @ Reds 3–1 (10) Joe Hoerner (3–2) Joe Gibbon (1–2) None 16,215 29–40
70 June 25 Pirates 4–14 Steve Blass (9–3) Jim Bunning (5–9) None 38,736 29–41
71 June 26 Pirates 9–11 Dock Ellis (12–3) Chris Short (4–9) Dave Giusti (14) 24,965 29–42
72 June 27 (1) Pirates 8–4 Woodie Fryman (2–3) Bob Johnson (4–5) Joe Hoerner (4) see 2nd game 30–42
73 June 27 (2) Pirates 9–10 Bob Veale (3–0) Joe Hoerner (3–3) Dave Giusti (15) 37,062 30–43
74 June 28 @ Mets 1–3 Gary Gentry (7–5) Rick Wise (8–5) None 24,151 30–44
75 June 29 @ Mets 0–3 Tom Seaver (10–3) Barry Lersch (4–7) None 22,017 30–45
76 June 30 Reds 7–4 Bucky Brandon (4–3) Joe Gibbon (1–3) None 17,578 31–45
July (15–16)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
77 July 1 Reds 1–5 Jim McGlothlin (4–5) Jim Bunning (5–10) None 15,586 31–46
78 July 2 (1) @ Expos 2–4 Dan McGinn (1–1) Rick Wise (8–6) None see 2nd game 31–47
79 July 2 (2) @ Expos 8–4 Woodie Fryman (3–3) Bill Stoneman (9–8) None 22,210 32–47
80 July 3 @ Expos 6–3 Joe Hoerner (4–3) Carl Morton (7–10) None 17,074 33–47
81 July 4 @ Expos 10–6 Chris Short (5–9) Claude Raymond (1–6) Bill Wilson (1) 16,422 34–47
82 July 5 @ Braves 6–5 Woodie Fryman (4–3) Bob Priddy (3–5) Joe Hoerner (5) 33,353 35–47
83 July 6 @ Braves 2–5 George Stone (2–3) Rick Wise (8–7) Cecil Upshaw (11) 7,950 35–48
84 July 7 @ Braves 2–4 Ron Reed (9–6) Barry Lersch (4–8) None 12,268 35–49
85 July 8 Expos 7–5 Bill Wilson (1–2) Howie Reed (2–2) None 12,586 36–49
86 July 9 Expos 0–3 Steve Renko (8–9) Chris Short (5–10) None 14,847 36–50
87 July 10 (1) Expos 2–0 Woodie Fryman (5–3) John Strohmayer (2–2) None see 2nd game 37–50
88 July 10 (2) Expos 3–2 Rick Wise (9–7) Bill Stoneman (10–9) None 37,014 38–50
89 July 11 Expos 11–5 Bill Champion (1–1) Dan McGinn (1–2) Joe Hoerner (6) 10,321 39–50
July 13 1971 Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Tiger Stadium in Detroit
90 July 15 @ Cubs 6–7 Joe Decker (1–1) Jim Bunning (5–11) None 26,346 39–51
91 July 16 @ Cubs 2–11 Ferguson Jenkins (14–8) Chris Short (5–11) None 23,212 39–52
92 July 17 @ Cubs 5–2 Woodie Fryman (6–3) Bill Hands (9–10) Joe Hoerner (7) 30,352 40–52
93 July 18 (1) @ Astros 1–0 Ken Reynolds (2–2) Don Wilson (6–7) None see 2nd game 41–52
94 July 18 (2) @ Astros 7–10 George Culver (4–6) Jim Bunning (5–12) None 32,181 41–53
95 July 19 @ Astros 2–3 (11) Buddy Harris (1–0) Bill Wilson (1–3) None 13,693 41–54
96 July 20 @ Cardinals 5–1 Chris Short (6–11) Jerry Reuss (8–10) None 14,650 42–54
97 July 21 @ Cardinals 1–6 Reggie Cleveland (9–8) Barry Lersch (4–9) None 16,200 42–55
98 July 22 @ Cardinals 0–8 Bob Gibson (7–9) Woodie Fryman (6–4) None 20,547 42–56
99 July 23 Cubs 4–3 Ken Reynolds (3–2) Ken Holtzman (9–11) Bill Wilson (2) 48,543 43–56
100 July 24 Cubs 1–2 Ferguson Jenkins (16–8) Rick Wise (9–8) None 30,240 43–57
101 July 25 Cubs 2–1 Bill Wilson (2–3) Bill Hands (9–11) None 19,572 44–57
102 July 26 Astros 4–7 (15) Jim Ray (7–2) Bucky Brandon (4–4) None 10,848 44–58
103 July 27 (1) Astros 8–3 Woodie Fryman (7–4) Larry Dierker (12–5) None see 2nd game 45–58
104 July 27 (2) Astros 1–5 Wade Blasingame (7–8) Ken Reynolds (3–3) None 20,779 45–59
105 July 28 Astros 3–6 Don Wilson (8–7) Rick Wise (9–9) None 15,802 45–60
106 July 30 Cardinals 3–4 Bob Gibson (9–9) Chris Short (6–12) None 26,461 45–61
107 July 31 Cardinals 5–4 (16) Bucky Brandon (5–4) Moe Drabowsky (5–1) None 19,269 46–61
August (11–16)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
108 August 1 Cardinals 6–9[a] (13) Stan Williams (4–4) Manny Muñiz (0–1) None 22,432 46–62
109 August 2 Braves 4–0 Rick Wise (10–9) George Stone (4–4) None 12,104 47–62
110 August 3 Braves 3–2 Chris Short (7–12) Bob Priddy (4–9) None 17,703 48–62
111 August 4 Braves 3–5 Mike McQueen (3–1) Bucky Brandon (5–5) None 19,086 48–63
112 August 6 @ Pirates 3–2 Bill Wilson (3–3) Dock Ellis (15–6) None 21,323 49–63
113 August 7 @ Pirates 5–3 Rick Wise (11–9) Bob Moose (7–7) Bill Wilson (3) 29,565 50–63
114 August 8 (1) @ Pirates 3–2 Woodie Fryman (8–4) Steve Blass (11–5) Joe Hoerner (8) see 2nd game 51–63
115 August 8 (2) @ Pirates 0–4 Bob Johnson (7–7) Chris Short (7–13) None 31,448 51–64
116 August 10 @ Dodgers 1–6 Bill Singer (7–13) Barry Lersch (4–10) None 26,508 51–65
117 August 11 @ Dodgers 1–4 Doyle Alexander (4–3) Ken Reynolds (3–4) None 20,135 51–66
118 August 12 @ Dodgers 3–1 (13) Bucky Brandon (6–5) Pete Mikkelsen (7–5) None 19,755 52–66
119 August 13 @ Padres 5–2 Rick Wise (12–9) Fred Norman (2–9) None 4,006 53–66
120 August 15 (1) @ Padres 4–5 Dick Kelley (2–3) Bill Wilson (3–4) None see 2nd game 53–67
121 August 15 (2) @ Padres 2–3 Dave Roberts (11–12) Barry Lersch (4–11) None 8,108 53–68
122 August 17 @ Giants 1–5 Gaylord Perry (13–9) Ken Reynolds (3–5) None 8,973 53–69
123 August 18 @ Giants 0–7 John Cumberland (7–2) Rick Wise (12–10) None 10,663 53–70
124 August 20 Dodgers 5–9 Pete Mikkelsen (8–5) Chris Short (7–14) Jim Brewer (15) 30,006 53–71
125 August 21 Dodgers 3–0 Woodie Fryman (9–4) Bill Singer (7–15) None 46,633 54–71
126 August 22 Dodgers 3–2 Ken Reynolds (4–5) Claude Osteen (12–8) Bill Wilson (4) 26,403 55–71
127 August 23 Padres 3–1 Rick Wise (13–10) Fred Norman (2–11) None 10,655 56–71
128 August 24 Padres 0–2 Ed Acosta (1–0) Barry Lersch (4–12) None 10,688 56–72
129 August 25 Padres 0–7 Clay Kirby (12–10) Bill Champion (1–2) None 10,696 56–73
August 27 Giants Postponed (rain);[17] Makeup: August 28 as a traditional double-header
130 August 28 (1) Giants 2–5 Steve Hamilton (2–2) Woodie Fryman (9–5) Jerry Johnson (15) see 2nd game 56–74
131 August 28 (2) Giants 7–3 Rick Wise (14–10) John Cumberland (7–3) None 33,012 57–74
132 August 29 Giants 3–8 Juan Marichal (14–9) Ken Reynolds (4–6) None 26,825 57–75
133 August 30 @ Pirates 4–6 Luke Walker (6–8) Bill Wilson (3–5) Dave Giusti (28) 13,399 57–76
134 August 31 @ Pirates 5–7 Bruce Kison (4–4) Joe Hoerner (4–4) Bob Miller (9) 16,179 57–77
September (10–18)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
135 September 1 @ Pirates 7–10 Luke Walker (7–8) Bucky Brandon (6–6) None 11,278 57–78
136 September 2 Mets 1–3 Gary Gentry (11–9) Rick Wise (14–11) None 17,110 57–79
137 September 3 Mets 1–7 Ray Sadecki (6–5) Ken Reynolds (4–7) None 16,293 57–80
138 September 4 (1) Mets 5–6 (10) Tug McGraw (11–4) Dick Selma (0–2) None see 2nd game 57–81
139 September 4 (2) Mets 0–3 Jim McAndrew (1–5) Barry Lersch (4–13) Danny Frisella (9) 25,560 57–82
140 September 5 Mets 7–3 Woodie Fryman (10–5) Nolan Ryan (9–12) Bill Wilson (5) 16,886 58–82
141 September 6 (1) Cardinals 3–6 Bob Gibson (14–12) Rick Wise (14–12) None see 2nd game 58–83
142 September 6 (2) Cardinals 2–1 Bill Champion (2–2) Chris Zachary (3–9) Joe Hoerner (9) 13,193 59–83
143 September 7 Cardinals 5–7 (10) Don Shaw (6–1) Bill Wilson (3–6) Al Santorini (2) 9,339 59–84
144 September 10 @ Mets 3–4 Jerry Koosman (6–9) Rick Wise (14–13) Danny Frisella (10) 25,437 59–85
145 September 11 @ Mets 2–9 Tom Seaver (18–8) Woodie Fryman (10–6) None 19,508 59–86
146 September 12 @ Mets 2–3 Danny Frisella (7–4) Joe Hoerner (4–5) None 16,704 59–87
147 September 13 @ Cardinals 6–5 (10) Bill Wilson (4–6) Don Shaw (6–2) None 13,863 60–87
148 September 14 @ Cardinals 5–4 Rick Wise (15–13) Chris Zachary (3–10) Chris Short (1) 10,640 61–87
149 September 15 Expos 0–1 Ernie McAnally (10–10) Woodie Fryman (10–7) None 7,734 61–88
150 September 16 Expos 2–6 Steve Renko (15–14) Bill Champion (2–3) None 5,893 61–89
151 September 17 Cubs 3–4 Joe Decker (3–1) Ken Reynolds (4–8) Larry Gura (1) 13,644 61–90
152 September 18 Cubs 4–3 (12) Rick Wise (16–13) Phil Regan (5–4) None 7,740 62–90
153 September 19 Cubs 3–6 Ferguson Jenkins (22–13) Barry Lersch (4–14) None 20,815 62–91
September 20 @ Expos Postponed (rain);[18] Makeup: September 21 as a traditional double-header
September 20 @ Expos Postponed (rain);[18] Makeup: September 23[19]
154 September 21 (1) @ Expos 5–4 Bill Champion (3–3) Carl Morton (10–17) Bill Wilson (6) see 2nd game 63–91
155 September 21 (2) @ Expos 3–4 Jim Britton (2–3) Ken Reynolds (4–9) Mike Marshall (23) 14,963 63–92
156 September 22 @ Expos 0–2 Bill Stoneman (17–14) Rick Wise (16–14) None 8,798 63–93
157 September 23 @ Expos 6–4 Wayne Twitchell (1–0) Ernie McAnally (10–12) Bill Wilson (7) 6,786 64–93
158 September 24 @ Cubs 6–1 Barry Lersch (5–14) Milt Pappas (17–14) None 2,183 65–93
159 September 25 @ Cubs 2–4 Ferguson Jenkins (23–13) Bill Champion (3–4) None 8,891 65–94
160 September 26 @ Cubs 5–1 Ken Reynolds (5–9) Joe Decker (3–2) None 18,505 66–94
161 September 28 Pirates 6–3 Rick Wise (17–14) Dock Ellis (19–9) None 14,582 67–94
162 September 30 Pirates 3–4 Bob Moose (11–7) Bill Champion (3–5) Dave Giusti (30) 14,157 67–95
^[a] The August 1, 1971, game was protested by the Cardinals in the top of the twelfth inning.[20]
The protest was later upheld, and the game was completed on September 7 (with new umpires).[20][21]

Roster

1971 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
RF Roger Freed 118 348 77 .221 6 37

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Terry Harmon 79 221 45 .204 0 12
Ron Stone 95 185 42 .227 2 23
Joe Lis 59 123 26 .211 6 10
Tony Taylor 36 107 25 .234 1 5
Pete Koegel 12 26 6 .231 0 3
Johnny Briggs 10 22 4 .182 0 3

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Woodie Fryman 37 149.1 10 7 3.38 104
Jim Bunning 29 110 5 12 5.48 58
Bill Champion 37 108.2 3 5 4.39 49

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Bucky Brandon 52 6 6 4 3.90 44
Manny Muñiz 5 0 1 0 6.97 6

Awards and honors

Records

  • Terry Harmon, National League record, Most Chances Accepted in one nine-inning game (18 chances on June 12, 1971)[22]

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Eugene Emeralds Pacific Coast League Andy Seminick
AA Reading Phillies Eastern League Nolan Campbell
A Peninsula Phillies Carolina League Howie Bedell
A Spartanburg Phillies Western Carolinas League Bob Wellman
A-Short Season Walla Walla Phillies Northwest League Garry Powel
Rookie Pulaski Phillies Appalachian League Harry Lloyd

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Peninsula[23]

Notes

  1. ^ Doc Edwards page at Baseball-Reference
  2. ^ Curt Flood page at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Roger Freed page at Baseball Reference
  4. ^ "Curtain Up On a Mod New Act". Sports Illustrated. Time Inc. April 17, 1971. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  5. ^ Duke DeLuca (June 18, 1971). "Palmer Doesn't Mind The Exhibition Games". Reading Eagles. pp. 26, 28. Retrieved March 9, 2011.
  6. ^ "June 25, 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates at Philadelphia Phillies Box Score and Play by Play". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved April 3, 2009.
  7. ^ Mandel, Ken (June 25, 2003). "Stargell's star a lasting tribute; Blast is marking point for all hitters". MLB.com. Archived from the original on May 5, 2009. Retrieved April 3, 2009.
  8. ^ Johnny Briggs page at Baseball Reference
  9. ^ Tony Taylor page at Baseball Reference
  10. ^ Jerry Martin page at Baseball Reference
  11. ^ Mike Schmidt page at Baseball Reference
  12. ^ Dane Iorg page at Baseball Reference
  13. ^ "1971 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com.
  14. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. April 22, 1971. p. 26. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  15. ^ "Baseball record". The Gazette. Montreal. May 7, 1971. p. 20. Retrieved May 7, 2015.
  16. ^ "Baseball Standings". Milwaukee Journal. May 9, 1971. p. 1, part 3. Retrieved May 7, 2015.
  17. ^ "Baseball". Milwaukee Sentinel. August 28, 1971. p. 2, part 2. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  18. ^ a b "Baseball Standings". Milwaukee Journal. September 21, 1971. p. 17, part 2. Retrieved May 21, 2015.
  19. ^ "Original Regular Season Schedules". retrosheet.org. Retrieved May 21, 2015.
  20. ^ a b "St. Louis Cardinals 9, Philadelphia Phillies 6". retrosheet.org. August 1, 1971. Retrieved May 16, 2015. ... 1:49 rain delay; ... [3 runs score] ... 31 minute rain delay; game was to revert to 3–3 tie when rain removal machine broke down before making field playable; the Cardinals protested and won; game resumed on 9/7 with new umpires[.]
  21. ^ "Aug 1, 1971, Cardinals at Phillies Play by Play and Box Score". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. August 1, 1971. Retrieved May 16, 2015.
  22. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.93, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  23. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

Further reading

References

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