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1967 Major League Baseball season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1967 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 10 – October 12, 1967
Number of games162
Number of teams20
Draft
Top draft pickRon Blomberg
Picked byNew York Yankees
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Carl Yastrzemski (BOS)
NL: Orlando Cepeda (STL)
AL championsBoston Red Sox
  AL runners-upDetroit Tigers
NL championsSt. Louis Cardinals
  NL runners-upSan Francisco Giants
World Series
ChampionsSt. Louis Cardinals
  Runners-upBoston Red Sox
World Series MVPBob Gibson (STL)
 MLB seasons

The 1967 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 10 to October 12, 1967. The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Boston Red Sox four games to three in the World Series, which was the first World Series appearance for the Red Sox in 21 years. Following the season, the Kansas City Athletics relocated to Oakland.

The season was filled with historic seasons from multiple players. Carl Yastrzemski of the Boston Red Sox had tied for the most home runs in MLB with Harmon Killebrew, giving him the elusive triple crown. He led the American League in batting average (.326), home runs due to the tie with Killebrew (44) and runs batted in (121).

This feat would not be accomplished again until Miguel Cabrera earned the triple crown in 2012 with the Detroit Tigers.[1] Yastrzemski also won the AL MVP and led the Red Sox to the AL pennant for the first time in nearly two decades. They would ultimately lose to the St. Louis Cardinals 7–2 in Game 7 of the World Series.[2]

The Cardinals had standout players as well, with first baseman Orlando Cepeda becoming the first unanimously voted NL MVP. Cepeda finished the season with 25 home runs, 111 rbis and a .325 batting average. He did however, struggle in the World Series, hitting only .103 with one RBI.[3]

Awards and honors

Dodgers vs. Reds at Dodger Stadium, June 1967
Dodgers vs. Reds at Dodger Stadium, June 1967

MLB statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Carl Yastrzemski1 BOS .326 Roberto Clemente PIT .357
HR Harmon Killebrew MIN
Carl Yastrzemski1 BOS
44 Hank Aaron ATL 39
RBI Carl Yastrzemski1 BOS 121 Orlando Cepeda STL 111
Wins Jim Lonborg BOS
Earl Wilson DET
22 Mike McCormick SF 22
ERA Joe Horlen CHW 2.06 Phil Niekro ATL 1.87
SO Jim Lonborg BOS 246 Jim Bunning PHI 253
SV Minnie Rojas CAL 27 Ted Abernathy CIN 28
SB Bert Campaneris KC 55 Lou Brock STL 52

1 American League Triple Crown Batting Winner

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
       
  AL Boston Red Sox 3
  NL St. Louis Cardinals 4

Home Field Attendance

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game
St. Louis Cardinals[4] 101 21.7% 2,090,145 22.0% 25,804
Boston Red Sox[5] 92 27.8% 1,727,832 113.0% 21,331
Los Angeles Dodgers[6] 73 -23.2% 1,664,362 -36.4% 20,548
New York Mets[7] 61 -7.6% 1,565,492 -19.0% 20,070
Minnesota Twins[8] 91 2.2% 1,483,547 17.8% 18,315
Detroit Tigers[9] 91 3.4% 1,447,143 28.7% 17,648
Atlanta Braves[10] 77 -9.4% 1,389,222 -9.8% 17,151
Houston Astros[11] 69 -4.2% 1,348,303 -28.0% 16,646
California Angels[12] 84 5.0% 1,317,713 -5.9% 15,876
New York Yankees[13] 72 2.9% 1,259,514 12.0% 15,360
San Francisco Giants[14] 91 -2.2% 1,242,480 -25.0% 15,152
Chicago White Sox[15] 89 7.2% 985,634 -0.4% 12,020
Chicago Cubs[16] 87 47.5% 977,226 53.7% 11,634
Cincinnati Reds[17] 87 14.5% 958,300 29.0% 11,831
Baltimore Orioles[18] 76 -21.6% 955,053 -20.6% 12,403
Pittsburgh Pirates[19] 81 -12.0% 907,012 -24.2% 11,198
Philadelphia Phillies[20] 82 -5.7% 828,888 -25.2% 10,361
Washington Senators[21] 76 7.0% 770,868 33.8% 9,636
Kansas City Athletics[22] 62 -16.2% 726,639 -6.1% 8,971
Cleveland Indians[23] 75 -7.4% 662,980 -26.6% 8,185

Other

  • April 21 – The Los Angeles Dodgers run of 737 consecutive games without a game being rained out ends.[24]
  • May 14 - Mickey Mantle hit his 500th home run at Yankee Stadium.
  • October 18, 1967: City officials from Kansas City, Oakland and Seattle were invited by Joe Cronin to discuss the A's relocation plans. United States Senator Stuart Symington attended the meeting and discussed the possibility of revoking baseball's antitrust exemption if the A's were allowed to leave Kansas City. The owners began deliberation and after the first ballot, only six owners were in favor of relocation. The owner of Baltimore voted against, while the ownership for Cleveland, New York and Washington had abstained.[25] In the second ballot, the New York Yankees voted in favor of the Athletics relocation to Oakland. To appease all interested parties, the Athletics announced that MLB would expand to Kansas City and Seattle no later than the 1971 MLB season.[26] MLB owners, bowing to Symington's threat, awarded Kansas City and Seattle expansion American League franchises for the 1969 season.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Miguel Cabrera becomes 1st Triple Crown winner in 45 years; Buster Posey wins NL batting title". The Washington Post. October 4, 2012. Archived from the original on December 24, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  2. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/c/cepedor01.shtml
  3. ^ https://www.baseball-almanac.com/yearly/yr1967a.shtml
  4. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. ^ Pellowski, Michael J (2007). The Little Giant Book of Baseball Facts. United States: Sterling Publishing Co. pp. 352. ISBN 9781402742736.
  25. ^ Charlie Finley: The Outrageous Story of Baseball's Super Showman, p. 113, G. Michael Green and Roger D. Launius. Walker Publishing Company, New York, 2010, ISBN 978-0-8027-1745-0
  26. ^ Charlie Finley: The Outrageous Story of Baseball's Super Showman, p.114, G. Michael Green and Roger D. Launius. Walker Publishing Company, New York, 2010, ISBN 978-0-8027-1745-0

External links

This page was last edited on 10 October 2020, at 01:23
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