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1966 United States elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1966 United States elections
1964          1965          1966          1967          1968
Midterm elections
Election dayNovember 8
Incumbent presidentLyndon B. Johnson (Democratic)
Next Congress90th
Senate elections
Overall controlDemocratic hold
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
(33 Class 2 seats + 2 special elections)
Net seat changeRepublican +3
1966 United States Senate special election in South Carolina1966 United States Senate special election in Virginia1966 United States Senate election in Alabama1966 United States Senate election in Alaska1966 United States Senate election in Arkansas1966 United States Senate election in Colorado1966 United States Senate election in Delaware1966 United States Senate election in Georgia1966 United States Senate election in Idaho1966 United States Senate election in Illinois1966 United States Senate election in Iowa1966 United States Senate election in Kansas1966 United States Senate election in Kentucky1966 United States Senate election in Louisiana1966 United States Senate election in Maine1966 United States Senate election in Massachusetts1966 United States Senate election in Michigan1966 United States Senate election in Minnesota1966 United States Senate election in Mississippi1966 United States Senate election in Montana1966 United States Senate election in Nebraska1966 United States Senate election in New Hampshire1966 United States Senate election in New Jersey1966 United States Senate election in New Mexico1966 United States Senate election in North Carolina1966 United States Senate election in Oklahoma1966 United States Senate election in Oregon1966 United States Senate election in Rhode Island1966 United States Senate election in South Carolina1966 United States Senate election in South Dakota1966 United States Senate election in Tennessee1966 United States Senate election in Texas1966 United States Senate election in Virginia1966 United States Senate election in West Virginia1966 United States Senate election in Wyoming1966 United States Senate elections results map.svg
About this image
1966 Senate election results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold

  Republican gain   Republican hold
House elections
Overall controlDemocratic hold
Seats contestedAll 435 voting seats
Popular vote marginDemocratic +1.7%
Net seat changeRepublican +47
1966 House Districts.png
1966 House of Representatives election results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold

  Republican gain   Republican hold
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested35
Net seat changeRepublican +8
1966 Alabama gubernatorial election1966 Alaska gubernatorial election1966 Arizona gubernatorial election1966 Arkansas gubernatorial election1966 California gubernatorial election1966 Colorado gubernatorial election1966 Connecticut gubernatorial election1966 Florida gubernatorial election1966 Georgia gubernatorial election1966 Hawaii gubernatorial election1966 Idaho gubernatorial election1966 Iowa gubernatorial election1966 Kansas gubernatorial election1966 Maine gubernatorial election1966 Maryland gubernatorial election1966 Massachusetts gubernatorial election1966 Michigan gubernatorial election1966 Minnesota gubernatorial election1966 Nebraska gubernatorial election1966 Nevada gubernatorial election1966 New Hampshire gubernatorial election1966 New Mexico gubernatorial election1966 New York gubernatorial election1966 Ohio gubernatorial election1966 Oklahoma gubernatorial election1966 Oregon gubernatorial election1966 Pennsylvania gubernatorial election1966 Rhode Island gubernatorial election1966 South Carolina gubernatorial election1966 South Dakota gubernatorial election1966 Tennessee gubernatorial election1966 Texas gubernatorial election1966 Vermont gubernatorial election1966 Wisconsin gubernatorial election1966 Wyoming gubernatorial election1966 United States gubernatorial elections results map.svg
About this image
1966 gubernatorial election results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold

  Republican gain   Republican hold

The 1966 United States elections were held on November 8, 1966, and elected the members of the 90th United States Congress. The election was held in the middle of Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson's second (only full) term, and during the Vietnam War. Johnson's Democrats lost forty-seven seats to the Republican Party in the House of Representatives. The Democrats also lost three seats in the U.S. Senate to the Republicans. Despite their losses, the Democrats retained control of both chambers of Congress. Republicans won a large victory in the gubernatorial elections, with a net gain of seven seats. This was the first election held after the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which led to a surge in African-American voter participation.[1]

The Republican Party had risked sliding into irrelevance after the disastrous 1964 elections, and the GOP's victory in this election invigorated the party, strengthening the conservative coalition. The GOP made inroads into the South and among blue collar workers, foreshadowing Nixon's Southern strategy and the rise of Reagan Democrats, respectively. Among the newly elected Republicans were future presidents Ronald Reagan (who soon became the leader of the right-wing of the Republican Party) as Governor of California and George H. W. Bush as a representative from Texas, and future vice president Spiro Agnew as Governor of Maryland. The election also helped establish former vice president Richard Nixon (who campaigned heavily for Republicans) as a front-runner for the 1968 Republican nomination. President Johnson was mostly unable to pass major expansions to the Great Society in the 90th Congress.[2]

After the smashing reelection victory of President Johnson in 1964, the Democratic Congress had passed a raft of liberal legislation. Labor union leaders claimed credit for the widest range of liberal laws since the New Deal era, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the War on Poverty; aid to cities and education; increased Social Security benefits; and Medicare for the elderly. The 1966 elections were an unexpected disaster, with defeats for many of the more liberal Democrats. According to Alan Draper, the AFL-CIO Committee on Political Action (COPE) was the main electioneering unit of the labor movement. It ignored the white backlash against civil rights, which had become a main Republican attack point. The COPE assumed falsely that union members were interested in issues of greatest salience to union leadership, but polls showed this was not true. The members were much more conservative. The younger ones were much more concerned about taxes and crime, and the older ones had not overcome racial biases. Furthermore a new issue--the War in Vietnam-- was bitterly splitting the New Deal coalition into hawks (led by Johnson and Vice-President Hubert Humphrey) and doves (led by Senators Eugene McCarthy and Robert Kennedy).[3][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1966" (PDF). U.S. House of Reps, Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 27 December 2011.
  2. ^ Busch, Andrew (1999). Horses in Midstream. University of Pittsburgh Press. pp. 94–100.
  3. ^ Alan Draper, "Labor and the 1966 Elections." Labor History 30.1 (1989): 76-92.
  4. ^ John L. Sullivan, and Robert E. O'Connor. "Electoral choice and popular control of public policy: The case of the 1966 house elections." American Political Science Review 66.4 (1972): 1256-1268.


This page was last edited on 15 August 2022, at 08:12
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