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1963 in baseball

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following are the baseball events of the year 1963 throughout the world.

Champions

Major League Baseball

Other champions

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax
American League National League
AVG Carl Yastrzemski BOS .321 Tommy Davis LAD .326
HR Harmon Killebrew MIN 45 Hank Aaron MIL and
Willie McCovey SF
44
RBI Dick Stuart BOS 118 Hank Aaron MIL 130
Wins Whitey Ford NYY 24 Sandy Koufax1 LAD and
Juan Marichal SF
25
ERA Gary Peters CHW 2.33 Sandy Koufax1 LAD 1.88
Ks Camilo Pascual MIN 202 Sandy Koufax1 LAD 306

1Major League Triple Crown Pitching Winner

Major league baseball final standings

Events

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

  • July 1- The Kansas City Athletics purchased the contract of Charley Lau from the Baltimore Orioles.
  • July 2 - The Giants' Juan Marichal pitched a 16-inning shutout against the Milwaukee Braves, outdueling Warren Spahn, who pitched 15+13 scoreless innings before Willie Mays won it 1–0 with a home run in the bottom of the 16th. In the 9th inning when the Giants' manager suggested Marichal should come out for a pinch hitter, he angrily replied “I am not going to come out of that game as long as that old man is still pitching.” Later, when the Braves manager suggested to Spahn that it was time for him to come out he was told that if that young kid could still pitch, then so could he. When it was over, Marichal had thrown 227 pitches and Spahn had thrown 201.
  • July 9 – At Municipal Stadium, the National League wins 5–3 over the American League in the All-Star Game. After four years, MLB had decided to return to the original single-game format. The American League out-hit the National League 11–6, but the effort went in vain as MVP Willie Mays put on a one-man show. Although he was held to a single, Mays collected two runs, two RBI, two stolen bases and made the defensive play of the game – a running catch that deprived Joe Pepitone of an extra base in the eighth inning. This game also marked the 24th and final All-Star appearance of Stan Musial, who pinch-hit in the fifth inning. He lined out to right field, leaving behind a .317 batting average (20-for-63) and an All-Star Game record of six home runs.
  • July 31 – A crowd of 7,288 at Cleveland Stadium watched Cleveland Indians infielder Woodie Held, pitcher Pedro Ramos, outfielder Tito Francona, and shortstop Larry Brown slug four straight solo home runs off Los Angeles Angels right-hander Paul Foytack in the bottom of the sixth inning. The four homers built the Indians' lead to 9–1, and they won, 9–5.

August

September

October

November

December

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

  • January 2 – Al Mamaux, 68, pitcher who twice won 20 games for the Pittsburgh Piates.
  • January 5 – Rogers Hornsby, 66, Hall of Fame second baseman who posted the highest lifetime batting average (.358) of any right-handed batter, also a seven-time batting champion including a .424 mark in 1924, twice MVP, and the first National League player to hit 300 home runs.
  • January 29 – Lee Meadows, 68, pitcher won 188 games for the Cardinals, Phillies and Pirates, as well as the first modern major leaguer to wear glasses.
  • January 31 – Ossie Vitt, 73, third baseman for the Tigers and Red Sox, manager of the Indians (1938–1940) and a longtime minor league skipper.

February

  • February 9 – Ray Starr, 56, All-Star pitcher who pitched for six teams and won 37 games.
  • February 15 – Bump Hadley, 58, pitcher who worked in 528 games over 16 years (1926–1941) for six MLB teams (going 161–165, 4.24); ended Mickey Cochrane's career with a 1937 pitch that fractured his skull; later a broadcaster.
  • February 20 – Bill Hinchman, 79, outfielder twice batted .300 for Pittsburgh, later a scout.
  • February 28 – Eppa Rixey, 71, pitcher elected to the Hall of Fame just one month earlier, until 1959 was winningest left-hander in NL history with 266 victories for Phillies and Reds.

March

  • March 1 – Irish Meusel, 69, left fielder batted .310 lifetime, led NL in RBI in 1923.
  • March 11 – Joe Judge, 68, first baseman who batted over .300 nine times for Senators, later coach at Georgetown for 20 years.
  • March 29 – Wilcy Moore, 65, relief pitcher who won last game of 1927 World Series for Yankees.

April

  • April 23 – Harry Harper, 67, pitched from 1913 through 1923 for the Washington Senators, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees and Brooklyn Robins.
  • April 27 – Johnny Hutchings, 47, pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds and Boston Braves in the 1940s.

May

  • May 4 – Dickie Kerr, 69, pitcher who as a 1919 rookie won two World Series games for the Chicago White Sox, as one of the players not involved in fixing the Series; later helped a struggling pitcher-turned-hitter, Stan Musial.
  • May 16 – Larry Woodall, 68, backup catcher who played 548 games for 1920–1929 Detroit Tigers; later, a longtime employee of Boston Red Sox as coach (1942–1948), director of public relations, and scout—when he famously took a pass on signing a teenaged Willie Mays.
  • May 22 – Dave Shean, 79, second baseman and captain of the World Series champion 1918 Red Sox.
  • May 23 – Gavvy Cravath, 82, right fielder who won six home runs titles with Phillies.
  • May 27 – Dave Jolly, 38, knuckleball relief pitcher for the Milwaukee Braves from 1953 to 1957.
  • May 31 – Ernie Sulik, 52, Outfielder for the 1936 Philadelphia Phillies.

June

  • June 6 – Charlie Mullen, 74, first baseman for the Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees in the 1910s.
  • June 8 – Earl Smith, 66, catcher for five National League champions, who batted .350 for the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1925 World Series.
  • June 18 – Ben Geraghty, 50, infielder who played in 70 total games for 1936 Brooklyn Dodgers and 1943–1944 Boston Braves; incumbent manager of the Jacksonville Suns of the International League and legendary minor league pilot who played a key role in the early career of Henry Aaron.
  • June 24 – George Trautman, 73, president of the minor leagues since 1946.
  • June 24 – Jud Wilson, 69, All-Star third baseman of the Negro leagues.
  • June 28 – Frank "Home Run" Baker, 77, Hall of Fame third baseman, a lifetime .307 hitter and four-time home run champion, as well as the last surviving member of Philadelphia Athletics' "$100,000 infield".

July

  • July 5 - Ben Demott, 74, pitcher for the Cleveland Naps from 1910 to 1911.
  • July 27 – Hooks Dauss, 73, pitcher won 222 games, all for Detroit.

August

  • August 15 – Karl Drews, 43, pitcher for four teams including 1947 champion Yankees.
  • August 24 – Ren Kelly, 63, pitched one game for the Philadelphia A's in 1923.

September

  • September 4 – Home Run Johnson, 88, early shortstop of the Negro leagues.
  • September 8 – Bill Knickerbocker, 51, infielder for five different teams from 1933 to 1942, and a member of two Yankees champion teams as a backup for 2B Joe Gordon and 3B Frankie Crosetti.
  • September 16 – Johnny Niggeling, 60, one of four knuckleballers in starting rotation of 1945 Washington Senators; also pitched for Boston Bees/Braves, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Browns between 1938 and 1946.
  • September 19 – Slim Harriss, 66, pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in the early 1920s.
  • September 27 – Andy Coakley, 80, pitcher won 18 games for 1905 Athletics, later coach at Columbia for 37 years.

October

  • October 2 – Cy Perkins, 67, catcher for 16 seasons, mostly with Philadelphia Athletics; later a coach for many years.

November

  • November 6 – Clarence Mitchell, 72, spitball pitcher won 125 games, hit into unassisted triple play in 1920 World Series.
  • November 12 – Ed Connolly, 54, catcher for the Boston Red Sox between 1929 and 1932; his son pitched for 1964 Red Sox.
  • November 13 – Muddy Ruel, 67, catcher for 19 seasons for six American League teams, including 1924 World Series champion Washington Senators (when he scored the Series-deciding run); held law degree from Washington University in St. Louis; later a longtime coach, manager of 1947 St. Louis Browns, general manager of 1954–1956 Detroit Tigers, and assistant to the Commissioner of Baseball.
  • November 14 – Oscar "Ski" Melillo, 64, second baseman in 1,377 games for St. Louis Browns (1926–1935) and Boston Red Sox (1935–1937); interim manager of 1938 Browns; later a longtime coach associated with manager Lou Boudreau.
  • November 22 – John F. Kennedy, 46, President of the United States who threw out the ceremonial first pitch of the 1961 MLB season and became only the 2nd president to attend an All-Star Game in 1962.

December

  • December 8 – Red Worthington, 57, left fielder for Boston Braves from 1931 to 1934.
  • December 30 – Wilbur Good, 78, outfielder for six teams, primarily the Cubs.

References

  1. ^ "New York Mets 10, Cincinnati Reds 3". Baseball-Reference.com. 1963-06-14.
  2. ^ "New York Mets 10, Houston Colt .45s 3". Baseball-Reference.com. 1963-09-27.
  3. ^ "The forgotten all-star game: 50 years ago, baseball's Latino legends played in Polo Grounds’ last game", by Robert Dominguez, New York Daily News


This page was last edited on 21 April 2021, at 11:21
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