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1960 United States Senate elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1960 United States Senate elections
Flag of the United States.svg

← 1958 November 8, 1960 1962 →

34 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
Senator Lyndon Johnson (1).jpg
EverettDirksen.jpg
Leader Lyndon Johnson
(retired)
Everett Dirksen
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since January 3, 1953 January 3, 1959
Leader's seat Texas Illinois
Seats before 66 34
Seats after 64 36
Seat change Decrease 2 Increase 2
Popular vote 18,547,250[1] 14,894,867[1]
Percentage 55.1% 44.2%
Swing Decrease 0.2% Increase 1.3%
Seats up 23 11
Races won 21 13

1960 United States Senate special election in Missouri1960 United States Senate election in Alabama1960 United States Senate election in Alaska1960 United States Senate election in Arkansas1960 United States Senate election in Colorado1960 United States Senate election in Delaware1960 United States Senate election in Georgia1960 United States Senate election in Idaho1960 United States Senate election in Illinois1960 United States Senate election in Iowa1960 United States Senate election in Kansas1960 United States Senate election in Kentucky1960 United States Senate election in Louisiana1960 United States Senate election in Maine1960 United States Senate election in Massachusetts1960 United States Senate election in Michigan1960 United States Senate election in Minnesota1960 United States Senate election in Mississippi1960 United States Senate election in Montana1960 United States Senate election in Nebraska1960 United States Senate election in New Hampshire1960 United States Senate election in New Jersey1960 United States Senate election in New Mexico1960 United States Senate election in North Carolina1960 United States Senate election in Oklahoma1960 United States Senate election in Oregon1960 United States Senate election in Rhode Island1960 United States Senate election in South Carolina1960 United States Senate election in South Dakota1960 United States Senate election in Tennessee1960 United States Senate election in Texas1960 United States Senate election in Virginia1960 United States Senate election in West Virginia1960 United States Senate election in Wyoming1960 United States Senate elections results map.svg
About this image
Results of the elections (excl. North Dakota):
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     No election

Majority Leader before election

Lyndon Johnson
Democratic

Elected Majority Leader

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

The 1960 United States Senate elections coincided with the election of John F. Kennedy as president on November 8, 1960. A special election was held on June 28, 1960, for a mid-term vacancy in North Dakota. The Republicans gained two seats at the expense of the Democrats. The Democrats nonetheless retained a commanding lead in the Senate with 64 seats to 36. As Majority Leader Lyndon B. Johnson was elected Vice President, Mike Mansfield became the new Majority Leader.

Results summary

64 36
Democratic Republican
Parties Total
Democratic Republican Other
Last election (1958) 64 34 0 98
Before these elections 66 34 0 100
Not up 43 23 0 66
Up 23 11 34
Class 2 (1954→1960) 22 11 33
Special: Class 3 1 0 1
Incumbent retired 4 1 5
Held by same party 3 1 4
Replaced by other party Decrease1 Democrat replaced by Increase1 Republican 1
Result 3 2 0 5
Incumbent ran 19 10 29
Won re-election 17 10 27
Lost re-election Decrease1 Democrat replaced by Increase1 Republican 1
Lost renomination,
but held by same party
0 0 0
Result 18 11 0 29
Total elected 21 13 0 34
Net gain/loss Decrease2 Increase2 Steady 2
Nationwide vote 18,547,250 14,894,867 218,893 33,661,010
Share 55.10% 44.25% 0.65% 100%
Result 64 36 0 100

Source: Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives (1961). "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 8, 1960" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 52.

Retirements

Democratic seats held by Democrats

  1. Montana: James E. Murray (D) was replaced by Lee Metcalf (D)
  2. Oregon: Hall S. Lusk (D) was replaced by Maurine Neuberger (D)
  3. Rhode Island: Theodore F. Green (D) was replaced by Claiborne Pell (D)

Democrats replaced by Republicans

  1. Wyoming: Joseph C. O'Mahoney (D) was replaced by Edwin Keith Thomson (R). But Thomson died before the Congress began and was then replaced by a Democratic appointee.

Republican seats held by Republicans

  1. Iowa: Thomas E. Martin (R) was replaced by Jack Miller (R)

Republicans replaced by Democrats

  1. North Dakota (Class 1): Norman Brunsdale (R) was replaced by Quentin Burdick (D)

Losing incumbents

Democrats lost to Republicans

  1. Delaware: J. Allen Frear Jr. (D) lost to J. Caleb Boggs (R)

Other changes

The Republicans' gain of two seats from the November elections was reduced to one seat after the election:

  1. Wyoming: Senator-elect Edwin Keith Thomson (R) died December 9, 1960, and was replaced by appointee John J. Hickey (D) at the beginning of the Congress.

Change in composition

After the June special election

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48 D49 D50
Majority → D51
D60 D59 D58 D57 D56 D55 D54 D53 D52
D61 D62 D63 D64 D65 D66
N.D. (sp)
Gain
R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

Before the November elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42 D43 D44
Ala.
Ran
D45
Alaska
Ran
D46
Ark.
Ran
D47
Del.
Ran
D48
Ga.
Ran
D49
Ill.
Ran
D50
La.
Ran
Majority → D51
Mich.
Ran
D60
R.I.
Retired
D59
Ore. (reg)
Ore. (sp)
Retired
D58
Okla.
Ran
D57
N.C.
Ran
D56
N.M.
Ran
D55
Mont.
Retired
D54
Mo. (sp)
Ran
D53
Miss.
Ran
D52
Minn.
Ran
D61
S.C.
Ran
D62
Tenn.
Ran
D63
Texas
Ran
D64
Va.
Ran
D65
W.Va.
Ran
D66
Wyo.
Retired
R34
S.D.
Ran
R33
N.J.
Ran
R32
N.H.
Ran
R31
Neb.
Ran
R21 R22 R23 R24
Colo.
Ran
R25
Idaho
Ran
R26
Iowa
Retired
R27
Kan.
Ran
R28
Ky.
Ran
R29
Maine
Ran
R30
Mass.
Ran
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

Result of the November elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42 D43 D44
Ala.
Re-elected
D45
Alaska
Re-elected
D46
Ark.
Re-elected
D47
Ga.
Re-elected
D48
Ill.
Re-elected
D49
La.
Re-elected
D50
Mich.
Re-elected
Majority → D51
Minn.
Re-elected
D60
S.C.
Re-elected
D59
R.I.
Hold
D58
Ore. (reg)
Ore. (sp)
Hold
D57
Okla.
Re-elected
D56
N.C.
Re-elected
D55
N.M.
Re-elected
D54
Mont.
Hold
D53
Mo. (sp)
Elected[a]
D52
Miss.
Re-elected
D61
Tenn.
Re-elected
D62
Texas
Re-elected
D63
Va.
Re-elected
D64
W.Va.
Re-elected
R36
Wyo.[b]
Gain
R35
Del.
Gain
R34
S.D.
Re-elected
R33
N.J.
Re-elected
R32
N.H.
Re-elected
R31
Neb.
Re-elected
R21 R22 R23 R24
Colo.
Re-elected
R25
Idaho
Re-elected
R26
Iowa
Hold
R27
Kan.
Re-elected
R28
Ky.
Re-elected
R29
Maine
Re-elected
R30
Mass.
Re-elected
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

Beginning of the next Congress

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48 D49 D50
Majority → D51
D60 D59 D58 D57 D56 D55 D54 D53 D52
D61 D62 D63 D64 D65
Wyo.[b]
Gain
R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican

Race summaries

Special elections during the 86th Congress

In these special elections, the winner was seated during 1960 or before January 3, 1961; ordered by election date.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
North Dakota
(Class 1)
Norman Brunsdale Republican 1959 (Appointed) Interim appointee retired.
New senator elected June 28, 1960.
Democratic-NPL gain.
Missouri
(Class 3)
Edward V. Long Democratic 1960 (Appointed) Interim appointee elected November 8, 1960.
Oregon
(Class 2)
Hall S. Lusk Democratic 1960 (Appointed) Interim appointee retired.
New senator elected November 8, 1960.
Democratic hold.
Winner was also elected to the next term, see below.

Elections leading to the next Congress

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 1961; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 2 seats.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama John Sparkman Democratic 1946 (Special)
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Alaska Bob Bartlett Democratic 1958 (New seat) Incumbent re-elected.
Arkansas John L. McClellan Democratic 1942
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Colorado Gordon Allott Republican 1954 Incumbent re-elected.
Delaware J. Allen Frear Jr. Democratic 1948
1954
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Georgia Richard Russell Jr. Democratic 1932 (Special)
1936
1942
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Idaho Henry Dworshak Republican 1946 (Special)
1948 (Lost)
1949 (Appointed)
1950 (Special)
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Henry Dworshak (Republican) 52.3%
  • R. F. Bob McLaughlin (Democratic) 47.7%
Illinois Paul Douglas Democratic 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Paul Douglas (Democratic) 54.6%
  • Samuel W. Witwer (Republican) 45.2%
Iowa Thomas E. Martin Republican 1954 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
Kansas Andrew Frank Schoeppel Republican 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky John Sherman Cooper Republican 1946 (Special)
1948 (Lost)
1952 (Special)
1954 (Lost)
1956 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected.
Louisiana Allen J. Ellender Democratic 1936
1942
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Maine Margaret Chase Smith Republican 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts Leverett Saltonstall Republican 1944 (Special)
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan Patrick V. McNamara Democratic 1954 Incumbent re-elected.
Minnesota Hubert Humphrey DFL 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Mississippi James Eastland Democratic 1942
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Montana James E. Murray Democratic 1934 (Special)
1936
1942
1948
1954
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Nebraska Carl Curtis Republican 1954 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Carl Curtis (Republican) 58.9%
  • Robert B. Conrad (Democratic) 41.1%
New Hampshire Styles Bridges Republican 1936
1942
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
New Jersey Clifford P. Case Republican 1954 Incumbent re-elected.
New Mexico Clinton Anderson Democratic 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina B. Everett Jordan Democratic 1958 (Appointed)
1958 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected.
Oklahoma Robert S. Kerr Democratic 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Oregon Hall S. Lusk Democratic 1960 (Appointed) Interim appointee retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Winner was also elected to finish the term, see above.
Rhode Island Theodore F. Green Democratic 1936
1942
1948
1954
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
  • Green tickY Claiborne Pell (Democratic) 68.9%
  • Raoul Archambault (Republican) 31.1%
South Carolina Strom Thurmond Democratic 1954
1954 (Appointed)
1956 (Resigned)
1956 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected.
South Dakota Karl E. Mundt Republican 1948
1948 (Appointed)
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Tennessee Estes Kefauver Democratic 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Estes Kefauver (Democratic) 71.8%
  • A. Bradley Frazier (Republican) 28.3%
Texas Lyndon B. Johnson Democratic 1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
Winner resigned at the end of the term to become U.S. Vice President.
New senator was appointed to begin the next term.
Virginia Absalom Willis Robertson Democratic 1946 (Special)
1948
1954
Incumbent re-elected.
West Virginia Jennings Randolph Democratic 1958 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Wyoming Joseph C. O'Mahoney Democratic 1954 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican gain, but winner died before Congress began
and was replaced by a Democratic appointee.

Alabama

Alabama election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Alabama Sen. John Sparkman.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee John Sparkman Julian Elgin
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 389,196 164,868
Percentage 70.24% 29.76%

1960 United States Senate election in Alabama results map by county.svg
County results

U.S. senator before election

John Sparkman
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

John Sparkman
Democratic

Incumbent John J. Sparkman won re-election, having served since 1946. He faced nominal opposition from Republican Julian E. Elgin in the then-deeply Democratic state of Alabama. Sparkman served from 1946 to 1979 in the Senate before retiring and being succeeded by Howell Heflin.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John J. Sparkman (Incumbent) 389,196 70.24
Republican Julian E. Elgin 164,868 29.76
Majority 224,328 40.48
Turnout 554,064
Democratic hold

Alaska

Alaska election

← 1958
1966 →
 
Edward Lewis Bartlett.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Bob Bartlett Lee McKinley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 38,041 21,937
Percentage 63.43% 36.58%

U.S. senator before election

Bob Bartlett
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Bob Bartlett
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Bob Bartlett was easily re-elected to his first full term in the U.S. Senate over Republican dentist Lee McKinley after originally being elected in 1958 upon Alaska's anticipated admission as a state into the United States. Bartlett had previously served as the last delegate from Alaska to Congress.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Bartlett (Incumbent) 38,041 63.42
Republican Lee L. McKinley 21,937 36.58
Majority 16,104 26.84
Turnout 59,978
Democratic hold

Arkansas

1960 United States Senate election in Arkansas

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
John Little McClellan.jpg
Nominee John L. McClellan
Party Democratic
Popular vote 337,036
Percentage 99.88%

U.S. senator before election

John L. McClellan
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John L. McClellan
Democratic

Incumbent senator John L. McClellan was re-elected to a fourth term with nominal opposition from write-in independent candidate Marvin Fuchs, who received just 449 of 377,485 votes.

1960 Democratic U.S. Senate primary[5][6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John L. McClellan (incumbent) unopposed
General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Little McClellan (Incumbent) 377,036 99.88
None Marvin Fuchs (write-in) 449 0.12
Majority 376,587 26.84
Turnout 377,485
Democratic hold

Colorado

Colorado election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Gordon Allott.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Gordon Allott Robert Lee Knous
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 389,428 334,854
Percentage 53.52% 46.02%

1960 United States Senate election in Colorado results map by county.svg
County results
Allott:      40-50%      50–60%      60–70%
Knous:      50–60%      60–70%

U.S. senator before election

Gordon Allott
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Gordon Allott
Republican

Incumbent Gordon Allott was re-elected to a second term in office, defeating lieutenant governor Robert Knous by just under eight percentage points. He would wind up winning re-election in 1966 before retiring in 1973, replaced by Democrat Floyd Haskell.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gordon L. Allott (Incumbent) 389,428 53.75
Democratic Robert L. Knous 331,752 45.79
Independent William R. Casey 3,351 0.46
Majority 57,676 7.96
Turnout 724,531
Republican hold

Delaware

Delaware election

← 1954
1966 →
 
BoggsCaleb.jpg
JAllenFrear.jpg
Nominee J. Caleb Boggs J. Allen Frear Jr.
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 98,874 96,090
Percentage 50.71% 49.29%

1960 United States Senate election in Delaware results map by county.svg
County Results
Boggs:      50-60%
Frear:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

J. Allen Frear Jr.
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

J. Caleb Boggs
Republican

J. Allen Frear ran for re-election to a third term, but he was defeated by Republican governor J. Caleb Boggs by a narrow 1% margin. Boggs would be re-elected in 1966, but he would lose re-election to a third term in 1972 to future U.S. President Joe Biden.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican J. Caleb Boggs 98,874 50.71
Democratic J. Allen Frear (Incumbent) 96,090 49.29
Majority 2,784 1.42
Turnout 194,964
Republican gain from Democratic

Georgia

Georgia election

← 1954 September 14, 1960 1966 →
 
Richard RussellJr.jpg
Nominee Richard Russell Jr.
Party Democratic
Electoral vote 410
Popular vote 560,256
Percentage 100.00%

U.S. senator before election

Richard Russell Jr.
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Richard Russell Jr.
Democratic

Incumbent Richard B. Russell Jr. was re-elected to a fifth term in office, running unopposed in the tantamount Democratic primary and facing nominal opposition in the deeply-Democratic Georgia.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard B. Russell Jr. (Incumbent) 576,140 99.94
None Scattering 355 0.06
Majority 575,785 98.98
Turnout 576,495
Democratic hold

Idaho

Henry Dworshak ran for re-election to a third term, defeating R.F. McLaughlin by just under five percentage points.

Idaho election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Henry Dworshak.jpg
Nominee Henry Dworshak R.F. McLaughlin
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 152,648 139,448
Percentage 52.26% 47.74%

U.S. senator before election

Henry Dworshak
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Henry Dworshak
Republican

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Henry Dworshak (Incumbent) 152,648 52.26
Democratic R. F. ‘Bob’ McLaughlin 139,448 47.74
Majority 13,200 4.52
Turnout 292,096
Republican hold

Illinois

Illinois election

← 1954
1966 →
Turnout84.24%
 
Senator Paul Douglas.jpg
No image.svg
Nominee Paul Douglas Samuel W. Witwer
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,530,945 2,093,846
Percentage 54.63% 45.20%

1960 United States Senate election in Illinois results map by county.svg
County results

U.S. senator before election

Paul Douglas
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Paul Douglas
Democratic

Incumbent Paul H. Douglas successfully ran for re-election to a third term, defeating Republican Samuel Witwer.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul H. Douglas (Incumbent) 2,530,943 54.63
Republican Samuel W. Witwer 2,093,846 45.20
Socialist Labor Louis Fisher 8,007 0.17
Majority 437,097 9.43
Turnout 4,632,796 84.24
Democratic hold

Iowa

Iowa election
Flag of Iowa (xrmap collection).svg

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
Jack Miller.png
Herschel C. Loveless (cropped).jpg
Nominee Jack Miller Herschel Loveless
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 642,643 595,119
Percentage 51.9% 48.1%

1960 United States Senate election in Iowa results map by county.svg
County results
Miller:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%
Loveless:      50-60%      60-70%

U.S. senator before election

Thomas E. Martin
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Jack Miller
Republican

Incumbent Republican Thomas Martin decided to retire, leaving this seat open. Republican Jack Miller won the open seat, defeating Democrat Herschel C. Loveless and riding the coattails of Richard Nixon's victory in the state.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Miller 642,463 51.91
Democratic Herschel C. Loveless 595,119 48.09
Majority 47,344 23.11
Turnout 1,237,582
Republican hold

Kansas

Incumbent Andrew Schoeppel ran for re-election to a third term, defeating Frank Theis. He would die before his term expired, and he was replaced by James B. Pearson.

Kansas election

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
Andrew Frank Schoeppel.jpg
Nominee Andrew F. Schoeppel Frank Theis
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 485,499 388,895
Percentage 54.64% 43.77%

U.S. senator before election

Andrew F. Schoeppel
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Andrew F. Schoeppel
Republican

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew F. Schoeppel (Incumbent) 485,499 54.64
Democratic Frank Theis 388,895 43.77
Prohibition C. E. Cowen 14,198 1.60
Majority 96,604 10.87
Turnout 888,592
Republican hold

Kentucky

Kentucky election

← 1956 (special) November 6, 1960 1966 →
 
JohnShermanCooper.jpg
Keen Johnson.jpg
Nominee John Sherman Cooper Keen Johnson
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 644,087 444,830
Percentage 59.15% 40.85%

1960 United States Senate election in Kentucky results map by county.svg
County results
Cooper:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%      80–90%      >90%
Johnson:      50–60%      60–70%

U.S. senator before election

John Sherman Cooper
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John Sherman Cooper
Republican

Incumbent John Sherman Cooper ran for re-election, defeating Keen Johnson by nearly 20%. This was the first time Cooper had won an election to a full Senate term, though he had previously served two partial terms.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Sherman Cooper (Incumbent) 644,087 59.15
Democratic Keen Johnson 444,830 40.85
Majority 199,257 18.30
Turnout 1,088,917
Republican hold

Louisiana

Incumbent Democrat Allen J. Ellender ran for re-election, having served since his election in 1936. In the deeply Democratic state of Louisiana, he was easily re-elected to another term.

Louisiana election

← 1954 November 6, 1960 1966 →
 
AllenJosephEllender.jpg
Nominee Allen J. Ellender George Vander
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 432,228 109,698
Percentage 79.77% 20.24%

U.S. senator before election

Allen J. Ellender
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Allen J. Ellender
Democratic

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Allen J. Ellender (Incumbent) 432,228 79.76
Republican George W. Reese Jr. 109,698 20.24
None Write-Ins 2 0.00
Majority 322,530 59.52
Turnout 541,928
Democratic hold

Maine

Maine election

← 1954
1966 →
 
MargaretChaseSmith.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Margaret Chase Smith Lucia Cormier
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 256,890 159,809
Percentage 61.65% 38.35%

1960 United States Senate election in Maine results map by county.svg
County Results
Smith:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Cormier:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

Margaret Chase Smith
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Margaret Chase Smith
Republican

Incumbent Republican Margaret Chase Smith, the first woman to serve in both houses of Congress, was overwhelmingly re-elected to a third term, defeating Lucia Cormier. This was the first election in which a woman was nominated by both major parties for the office of U.S Senate, meaning a woman was going to be elected regardless of who won.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Margaret Chase Smith (Incumbent) 256,890 61.65
Democratic Lucia M. Cormier 159,809 38.35
Majority 97,081 23.30
Turnout 416,699
Republican hold

Massachusetts

Massachusetts election

← 1954
1966 →
 
LeverettSaltonstall.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Leverett Saltonstall Thomas J. O'Connor
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,358,556 1,050,725
Percentage 56.19% 43.46%

1960 United States Senate election in Massachusetts results map by municipality.svg
Municipal results

U.S. senator before election

Leverett Saltonstall
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Leverett Saltonstall
Republican

Republican incumbent Leverett Saltonstall was re-elected to another term after being elected in 1944 in a special election. He defeated Democrat Thomas O'Connor Jr.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Leverett Saltonstall (Incumbent) 1,358,556 56.19
Democratic Thomas J. O'Connor, Jr. 1,050,725 43.46
Socialist Labor Lawrence Gilfedder 5,735 0.24
Prohibition Mark R. Shaw 2,794 0.12
None Others 3 0.00
Majority 307,831 12.73
Turnout 2,417,813
Republican hold

Michigan

Michigan election

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
Patrick Vincent McNamara.jpg
Alvin Morell Bentley.jpg
Nominee Patrick V. McNamara Alvin M. Bentley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,669,179 1,548,873
Percentage 51.73% 48.00%

1960 United States Senate election in Michigan results map by county.svg
County results
McNamara:      50–60%      60–70%
Bentley:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

U.S. senator before election

Patrick V. McNamara
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Patrick V. McNamara
Democratic

Democrat Patrick V. McNamara was narrowly re-elected against Republican Alvin Bentley, having served one full term prior.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick V. McNamara (Incumbent) 1,669,179 51.73
Republican Alvin Bentley 1,548,873 48.00
Socialist Workers Frank Lovell 3,282 0.10
Prohibition Rollin M. Severance 2,273 0.07
Socialist Labor James Sim 1,565 0.05
Independent American Alvin L. Reynolds 1,465 0.05
None Scattering 10 0.00
Majority 120,306 3.73
Turnout 3,226,647
Democratic hold

Minnesota

Minnesota election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Hubert Humphrey crop.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Hubert H. Humphrey P. Kenneth Peterson
Party Democratic (DFL) Republican
Popular vote 884,168 648,586
Percentage 57.53% 42.20%

1960 United States Senate election in Minnesota results map by county.svg
County results
Humphrey:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Peterson:      50-60%      60-70%

U.S. senator before election

Hubert H. Humphrey
Democratic (DFL)

Elected U.S. senator

Hubert H. Humphrey
Democratic (DFL)

Democrat Hubert Humphrey, who would later become Vice President, was re-elected over Republican challenger P. Kenneth Peterson. He had served since 1949.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic (DFL) Hubert Humphrey (Incumbent) 884,168 57.53
Republican P. Kenneth Peterson 648,586 42.20
None Write-Ins 4,085 0.27
Majority 117,791 15.33
Turnout 1,532,754
Democratic (DFL) hold

Mississippi

Mississippi election

← 1954
1966 →
 
James O Eastland.jpg
No image.svg
Nominee James Eastland Joe Moore
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 244,341 21,807
Percentage 91.8% 8.2%

1960 United States Senate election in Mississippi results map by county.svg
County results
Eastland:      80-90%      90-100%

U.S. senator before election

James Eastland
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

James Eastland
Democratic

Incumbent James Eastland, who had represented Mississippi in the Senate since 1943, was elected to another term in a landslide with 92% of the vote.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Eastland (Incumbent) 244,341 91.81
Republican Joe A. Moore 21,807 8.19
Majority 222,534 83.62
Turnout 266,148
Democratic hold

Missouri (special)

Following the death of incumbent Thomas C. Hennings, Democrat Edward V. Long, incumbent Lieutenant Governor of Missouri, ran against Republican Lon Hocker for the open seat. Long

Missouri election (special)

← 1954
1964 →
 
Edward V. Long.jpg
Nominee Edward V. Long Lon Hocker
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 999,656 880,576
Percentage 53.17% 46.83%

U.S. senator before election

Thomas C. Hennings Jr.
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Edward V. Long
Democratic

defeated Hocker by just under seven percentage points.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Edward V. Long 999,656 53.17
Republican Lon Hocker 880,576 46.83
Majority 119,080 6.34
Turnout 1,880,232
Democratic hold

Montana

Montana election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Lee Metcalf.jpg
Orvin Fjare.png
Nominee Lee Metcalf Orvin B. Fjare
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 140,331 136,281
Percentage 50.73% 49.27%

1960 United States Senate election in Montana results map by county.svg
County results

U.S. senator before election

James E. Murray
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Lee Metcalf
Democratic

After the retirement of incumbent Democrat James E. Murray, Democrat and representative Lee Metcalf and Republican Orvin Fjare ran for the open seat. Metcalf kept the seat Democratic, winning by just over 1%. This was despite Richard Nixon winning Montana in the concurrent presidential election.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lee Metcalf 140,331 50.73
Republican Orvin B. Fjare 136,281 49.27
Majority 4,050 1.46
Turnout 276,612
Democratic hold

Nebraska

Nebraska election

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
Carl Curtis.png
No image.png
Nominee Carl Curtis Robert B. Conrad
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 352,748 245,807
Percentage 58.93% 41.07%

1960 United States Senate election in Nebraska results map by county.svg
County results
Curtis:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Conrad:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

Carl Curtis
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Carl Curtis
Republican

Republican Carl Curtis, who had served since 1955, was re-elected to a second term over Democrat Robert Conrad by nearly 17 percentage points. Curtis won all but four counties in the state.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Carl T. Curtis (Incumbent) 352,748 58.91
Democratic Robert B. Conrad 245,837 41.06
N/A Scattering 158 0.03
Majority 106,941 17.86
Turnout 598,743
Republican hold

New Hampshire

Incumbent Republican Styles Bridges was re-elected to the Senate for a fifth term, defeating Democratic challenger Herbert W. Hill.

New Hampshire election

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1966 →
  New Hampshire Senator. Washington, D.C., Jan. 19. A new informal portrait of Senator H. Styles Bridges, Rep., of New Hampshire, 1-19-39 LCCN2016874829.tif
Nominee Styles Bridges Herbert W. Hill
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 173,521 114,024
Percentage 60.35% 39.65%

U.S. senator before election

Styles Bridges
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Styles Bridges
Republican

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Styles Bridges (Incumbent) 173,521 60.35
Democratic Herbert W. Hill 114,024 39.65
Majority 59,497 20.70
Turnout 287,545
Republican hold

Bridges died less than a year into his fifth term. With New Hampshire's other Senator Norris Cotton up for re-election in 1962 and following Bridges death. Both of New Hampshire's Senate seats would be up in the 1962 midterms.

New Jersey

New Jersey election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Rep Clifford P Case.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Clifford P. Case Thorn Lord
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,483,832 1,151,385
Percentage 55.69% 43.21%

1960 United States Senate election in New Jersey results map by county.svg
County results

Case:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%

Lord:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

Clifford P. Case
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Clifford P. Case
Republican

Incumbent Republican Clifford P. Case won re-election against Democrat Thorn Lord. Case would win re-election only one more time in 1966, losing in the 1972 Republican primary.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Clifford P. Case (Incumbent) 1,483,832 55.69
Democratic Thorn Lord 1,151,385 43.21
Conservative Winifred O. Perry 13,756 0.52
Socialist Labor Albert Ronis 11,784 0.44
Socialist Workers Gladys Grauer 3,599 0.14
Majority 332,447 12.48
Turnout 2,664,356
Republican hold

New Mexico

Incumbent Democrat Clinton Anderson was re-elected to a third term in a landslide, defeating Republican William Colwes.

New Mexico election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Clinton P. Anderson - Secretary of Agriculture.jpg
Nominee Clinton Presba Anderson William Colwes
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 190,654 109,897
Percentage 63.43% 36.57%

U.S. senator before election

Clinton Presba Anderson
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Clinton Presba Anderson
Democratic

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Clinton Presba Anderson (Incumbent) 190,654 63.43
Republican William Colwes 109,897 36.57
Majority 80,757 26.86
Turnout 300,551
Democratic hold

North Carolina

North Carolina election

← 1958 (special) November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
B. Everett Jordan.jpg
No image.svg
Nominee B. Everett Jordan R. Kyle Hayes
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 793,521 497,964
Percentage 61.44% 38.56%

1960 United States Senate election in North Carolina results map by county.svg
County results
Jordan:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Hayes:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%

Senator before election

B. Everett Jordan
Democratic

Elected Senator

B. Everett Jordan
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat B. Everett Jordan was re-elected to his first full term after winning a special election in 1958. He defeated Republican Kyle Hayes by a slightly slimmer margin than he defeated his Republican challenger in 1958.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic B. Everett Jordan (Incumbent) 793,521 61.44
Republican Kyle Hayes 497,964 38.56
Majority 295,557 22.88
Turnout 1,291,485
Democratic hold

North Dakota (special)

North Dakota special election

← 1958 June 28, 1960 1964 →
 
Quentin Burdick.jpg
John E. Davis in 1969 Civil Defense film.png
Nominee Quentin Burdick John E. Davis
Party Democratic-NPL Republican
Popular vote 104,593 103,475
Percentage 49.72% 49.19%

North Dakota Special Senate Election Results by County, 1960.png
Blue denotes counties won by Burdick.
Red denotes those won by Davis.

U.S. senator before election

Norman Brunsdale
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Quentin Burdick
Democratic-NPL

A special election was held June 28, 1960, to fill the seat vacated by William Langer, who died November 8, 1959. Clarence Norman Brunsdale, a former Governor of North Dakota, was temporarily appointed to the seat on November 19 of that year until the special election was held. North Dakota Democratic-NPL Party candidate Quentin N. Burdick faced Republican John E. Davis for election to the seat. Davis had been serving as Governor of the state since 1957.[7]

North Dakota special election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic-NPL Quentin N. Burdick 104,593 49.72
Republican John E. Davis 103,475 49.19
Independent Eugene Van Der Hoeven 1,337 0.64
Independent Clarence Haggard 934 0.45
Turnout 163,311

Oklahoma

Oklahoma election
Flag of Oklahoma (1941–1988).svg

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1964 (special) →
 
Robert S. Kerr.jpg
No image.svg
Nominee Robert S. Kerr B. Hayden Crawford
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 474,116 385,646
Percentage 54.84% 44.61%

1960 United States Senate election in Oklahoma results map by county.svg
County results
Kerr:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Crawford:      50–60%      60–70%

U.S. senator before election

Robert S. Kerr
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Robert S. Kerr
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Robert Kerr won re-election to a third term, though he would die before the term was up and would be replaced by J. Democrat Howard Edmondson.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert S. Kerr (Incumbent) 474,116 54.84
Republican B. Hayden Crawford 385,646 44.61
Independent Billy E. Brown 4,713 0.55
Majority 88,470 10.23
Turnout 864,475
Democratic hold

Oregon

First-term Democrat Richard L. Neuberger had been diagnosed with testicular cancer in 1958 that became terminal by 1960 — but was kept from the public.

Oregon election (special)

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1960 →
 
Maurine Brown Neuberger.jpg
Nominee Maurine Brown Neuberger Elmo Smith
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 422,024 345,464
Percentage 54.99% 45.01%

U.S. senator before election

Hall Lusk
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Marine Brown Neuberger
Democratic

remained at home in early 1960, reportedly battling the flu. Though still publicly seeking re-election, he told his campaign chair, attorney Jack Beatty, "Remember, there's always another Neuberger," referring to his wife. The comment, combined with Neuberger's reluctance to meet in public and weak voice on the phone, led Beatty to believe that Neuberger's condition was grave, a suspicion confirmed by the Senator's physician shortly before Neuberger died at Good Samaritan Hospital on March 9, 1960.[8][9]

Democratic Oregon Supreme Court judge Hall S. Lusk was appointed March 16, 1960, to continue the term, pending a special election in which he was not a candidate.

Primaries were held May 20, 1960, in which Newberger's widow, Democrat Maurine B. Neuberger and the Republican former-Governor of Oregon Elmo Smith easily won nomination.[10][11]

Maurine Brown Neuberger was elected November 8, 1960, both to finish the term and to the next term.

Oregon (special)

Special election[1][3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Maurine B. Neuberger 422,024 54.99
Republican Elmo Smith 345,464 45.01
Majority 76,560 9.98
Turnout 767,488
Democratic hold

Oregon (regular)

General election[1][4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Maurine B. Neuberger 412,757 54.61
Republican Elmo Smith 343,009 45.38
Majority 76,560 9.23
Turnout 755,875 42.74
Democratic hold

Maurine Brown Neuberger retired at the end of the term.

Rhode Island

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Claiborne Pell 275,575 68.90
Republican Raoul Archambault Jr. 124,408 31.10
Majority 151,167 37.80
Turnout 399,983
Democratic hold

South Carolina

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Strom Thurmond (Incumbent) 330,167 99.97
None Write-Ins 102 0.03
Majority 330,065 99.94
Turnout 330,269
Democratic hold

South Dakota

South Dakota election

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
Rep. Karl Mundt, Repub., of S.D., 2-21-40 LCCN2016877155 (cropped).jpg
George McGovern bioguide.jpg
Nominee Karl E. Mundt George McGovern
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 160,181 145,261
Percentage 52.44% 47.56%

U.S. senator before election

Karl E. Mundt
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Karl E. Mundt
Republican

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Karl Mundt (Incumbent) 160,181 52.44
Democratic George McGovern 145,261 47.56
Majority 14,920 4.88
Turnout 305,442
Republican hold

Tennessee

Tennessee election

 
SenatorKefauver(D-TN).jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Estes Kefauver A. Bradley Frazier
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 594,460 234,053
Percentage 71.75% 28.25%

U.S. senator before election

Estes Kefauver
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Estes Kefauver
Democratic

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Estes Kefauver (Incumbent) 594,460 71.75
Republican A. Bradley Frazier 234,053 28.25
None Write-Ins 6 0.00
Majority 360,407 43.50
Turnout 828,519
Democratic hold

Texas

Texas election

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1961 (special) →
 
Senator Lyndon B. Johnson in 1960 (cropped).jpg
John Tower (cropped).jpg
Nominee Lyndon B. Johnson John Tower
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,306,625 926,653
Percentage 57.98% 41.12%

1960 United States Senate election in Texas results map by county.svg
County Results

Johnson:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      90–100%

Tower:      50–60%      60–70%

U.S. senator before election

Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Lyndon B. Johnson
(did not take office)
Democratic

Incumbent two-term Democrat Lyndon Johnson was easily re-elected, but he was also elected the same day as Vice President with John F. Kennedy being elected president. This was the last election in which a Democrat was selected to Texas's class 2 Senate seat.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lyndon Johnson (Incumbent) 1,306,625 57.97
Republican John Tower 926,653 41.12
Constitution Bard W. Logan 20,506 0.91
Majority 379,972 16.85
Turnout 2,253,784
Democratic hold

Johnson resigned January 3, 1961 — before the new Congress began — and former Democratic senator William A. Blakley was appointed to begin the term, pending a special election. Republican John Tower, who lost to Johnson here in 1960, would win that May 1961 special election.

Virginia

Virginia election

← 1954
1966 →
 
Absalom Willis Robertson.jpg
Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Absalom Willis Robertson Stuart D. Baker
Party Democratic Independent Democratic
Popular vote 506,169 88,718
Percentage 81.3% 14.2%

1960 United States Senate election in Virginia results map by county.svg
County and independent city results

U.S. senator before election

Absalom Willis Robertson
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Absalom Willis Robertson
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Absalom Willis Robertson was overwhelmingly re-elected with 81% of the vote, facing no Republican opposition.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic A. Willis Robertson (Incumbent) 506,169 81.27
Independent Democratic Stuart D. Baker 88,718 14.24
Social Democratic Clarke T. Robbe 26,783 4.30
None Scattering 1,150 0.18
Majority 417,451 67.03
Turnout 622,820
Democratic hold

West Virginia

West Virginia election

← 1958 (special) November 8, 1960 1966 →
 
Jennings Randolph headshot.jpg
Cecil H. Underwood.jpg
Nominee Jennings Randolph Cecil H. Underwood
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 458,355 369,935
Percentage 55.3% 44.7%

1960 United States Senate election in West Virginia results map by county.svg
County results
Randolph:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Underwood:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

U.S. senator before election

Jennings Randolph
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Jennings Randolph
Democratic

Incumbent Jennings Randolph won re-election against Cecil Underwood, the incumbent governor of West Virginia.

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jennings Randolph (Incumbent) 458,355 55.34
Republican Cecil Underwood 369,935 44.66
None Write-Ins 2 0.00
Majority 88,420 10.68
Turnout 828,292
Democratic hold

Wyoming

Wyoming election

← 1954 November 8, 1960 1962 →
 
Edwin Keith Thomson (Wyoming Congressman).jpg
Nominee Keith Thomson Raymond B. Whitaker
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 78,103 60,447
Percentage 56.37% 43.63%

U.S. senator before election

Joseph C. O'Mahoney
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John J. Hickey
Democratic

General election[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Edwin Keith Thomson 78,103 56.37
Democratic Raymond B. Whitaker 60,447 43.63
Majority 17,656 12.74
Turnout 138,550
Republican gain from Democratic

Senator-Elect Thomson died a month after his election.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Appointee elected
  2. ^ a b Edwin Keith Thomson, the Republican Senator-elect as a result of the November election, died on December 9; Democrat John J. Hickey was appointed in his place and seated at the beginning of the 87th United States Congress on January 3, 1961.[2]

References

Bibliography

This page was last edited on 14 May 2022, at 00:29
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