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1953 in baseball

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following are the baseball events of the year 1953 throughout the world.

Champions

Major League Baseball

Other champions

Winter Leagues

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Mickey Vernon WSH .337 Carl Furillo BKN .344
HR Al Rosen CLE 43 Eddie Mathews MIL 49
RBI Al Rosen CLE 145 Roy Campanella BKN 143
Wins Bob Porterfield WSH 22 Robin Roberts PHP &
Warren Spahn MIL
23
ERA Ed Lopat NYY 2.42 Warren Spahn MIL 2.10
Ks Billy Pierce CHW 186 Robin Roberts PHP 198

Major league baseball final standings

Events

January

February

March

  • March 13 – Boston Braves owner, Lou Perini, announced he was moving the team to Milwaukee, where the Braves had their top farm club, in time for the 1953 season.
  • March 28 – Jim Thorpe, famed American Indian athlete considered by many as the greatest athlete in recorded history, died in Lomita, California at the age of 64. A native of Prague, Oklahoma, Thorpe played six seasons of Major League Baseball between 1913 and 1919, mostly for the New York Giants, in addition to his Olympic gold medals in the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon competition, while playing and coaching for a long time in the National Football League.[1]

April

May

June

July

August

  • August 30 – In game one of a doubleheader, Jim Pendleton hit three home runs, as the Milwaukee Braves beat the Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field, 19–4, while tying a major league record for the most home runs in a single game with eight, held by the New York Yankees since 1939. Besides, Pendleton became only the second rookie in history to hit three home runs in one game, joining his teammate Eddie Mathews, who dit it just a year earlier.[3] In the second of the twin bill, the Braves hit four more long balls and crushed again Pittsburgh, 11–5. Moreover, the 12 homers in a doubleheader shattered the previous mark of nine. This time, Mathews belted four dingers for the day, which gave him a National League-leading 43. Matthews would finish the season with 47 home runs, 30 of them on the road, setting also a major league record.[4] Previously, only the New York Yankees had ever hit more home runs in consecutive games, or in a doubleheader. The Yankees hit eight home runs in a 23–2 victory in the first game of a doubleheader, and five homers in a 10–0 win in the second game, played on June 28, 1939 against the Philadelphia Athletics at Shibe Park.[5]

September

October

  • October 5 – The New York Yankees defeat the Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–3, in Game 6 of the World Series, to win their record-setting fifth consecutive World Championship and sixteenth overall, four games to two. Billy Martin was the star of the Series with a record-setting 12 hits, including the game-winning single in the bottom of the 9th of Game 6 to clinch the title.
  • October 7 – Bill Veeck, facing dwindling attendance and revenue, is forced to sell the St. Louis Browns to a Baltimore-based group led by attorney Clarence Miles and brewer Jerry Hoffberger. The Browns would move to Baltimore and be known as the Baltimore Orioles starting in the 1954 season.
  • October 28- After a dispute with Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley, Dodgers announcer Red Barber resigns from his position and takes a job doing radio broadcast for the rival New York Yankees. Barber was upset that he could not get a higher fee from Gillette, who sponsored the T.V. broadcast of the 1953 World Series, and that O'Malley refused to support him.

November

  • November 9 – Reaffirming its earlier position, the United States Supreme Court rules, 7–2, that baseball is a sport and not a business and therefore not subject to antitrust laws. The ruling is made in a case involving New York Yankees minor league player George Toolson, who refused to move from Triple-A to Double-A.
  • November 10 – The New York Giants end their tour of Japan. It is reported that each Giants player received just $331 of the $3,000 they were promised.
  • November 24 – The Brooklyn Dodgers sign Walter Alston to a one-year pact as their manager for 1954. Alston will manage the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers over the next 23 seasons, winning 2,040 games and four World Championships.

December

Movies

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

  • October   5 – Rags Faircloth, 61, pitcher who made two appearances for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1919.
  • October 17 – Jim Delahanty, 74, one of five Delahanty brothers to play in the majors, a fine defensive second baseman who had a 13-year career with eight teams spanning 1901–1915, while batting a solid .283/.357/.373/.730 line and 1,159 hits in 1,186 career games.

November

December

Sources

  1. ^ Jim Thorpe Is Dead On West Coast at 64. Article published at The New York Times on March 29, 1953. Retrieved on February 25, 2018.
  2. ^ Ball, Bat and Bishop: the Origin of Ball Games. Henderson. by Robert W. (2001). University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-25-206992-5.
  3. ^ Milwaukee Braves Heroes and Heartbreak. Povletich, William (2009). Wisconsin Historical Society Press. ISBN 978-0-87-020423-4
  4. ^ August 30, 1953: Milwaukee Braves set National League home run record. Article and box scores published by SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  5. ^ New York Yankees 10, Philadelphia Athletics 0 (2). Game Played on Wednesday, June 28, 1939 (D) at Shibe Park. Retrosheet box score. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  6. ^ Doc Moskiman. Article written by Bill Nowlin. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 18, 2019.
  7. ^ Ben Taylor. Negro Leagues Baseball Museum. Retrieved on June 18, 2019.
  8. ^ Ben Taylor. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved on June 18, 2019.
  9. ^ Clyde Milan. Article written by Tom Simon. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Pitchers Stealing Home. Article written by Leonard Gettelson.SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  11. ^ A thorough account of pitchers who have started both games of a doubleheader in the major leagues. Article written by J.G. Preston. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  12. ^ May 2, 1917: Fred Toney and Reds prevail 1–0 in double no-hitter against Cubs' Hippo Vaughn. Article written by Mike Lynch. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  13. ^ Fred Toney statistics and history. Retrosheet. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  14. ^ a b c d Jim Thorpe Biography. Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  15. ^ Jim Thorpe (1887–1953). IMDb. Retrieved on June 19, 2019.
  16. ^ a b c Kid Nichols Statistics and History. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  17. ^ 1892 Championship Series Boston Beaneaters over Cleveland Spiders (5–0–1). Baseball Reference. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  18. ^ a b Kid Nichols Biography. Baseball Hall of Fame Official Website. Retrieved on February 24, 2018.
  19. ^ Kid Nichols Obituary. The New York Times, Sunday, April 12th, 1953. Retrieved from The Deadball Era on February 24, 2018.
  20. ^ Roy Patterson. Article written by Terry Bohn. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 21, 2019.
  21. ^ Cot's Baseball Contracts. Baseball Prospectus. Retrieved on June 24, 2019.
  22. ^ A thorough account of pitchers who have started both games of a doubleheader in the major leagues. Article by J.G. Preston. PrestonJG website. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  23. ^ Sam Leever. Article written by Mark Armour. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  24. ^ Ray Grimes. Article written by Bill Nowlin. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  25. ^ a b c Jesse Burkette batting and fielding statistics. Retrosheet. Retrieved on June 20, 2019.
  26. ^ a b c Jesse Burkett. Article written by David Jones. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on February 25, 2018.
  27. ^ a b Year by Year Leaders for Batting Average / Batting Champions. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on February 25, 2018.
  28. ^ Arnold Rothstein and Baseball's 1919 Black Sox Scandal. Article written by David Pietrusza. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  29. ^ Jim Tabor. Article written by Maurice Bouchard. Retrieved on June 25, 2019.
  30. ^ Jack Pfiester. Article written by Stuart Schimler. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 26, 2019.
  31. ^ Buck Herzog. Article written by Gabriel Schechter. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 26, 2019.
  32. ^ Tom Dougherty. Batting and pitching statistics. Baseball Reference Retrieved on June 13, 2019.
  33. ^ Billy Maharg. Article written by Bill Lamb. SABR BiographyProject. Retrieved on June 26, 2019.
  34. ^ Ed Barrow. Article written by Daniel R. Levitt. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 27, 2019.
  35. ^ Pinch Thomas. Article written by Joanne Hulbert. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 27, 2019.
  36. ^ Patsy Donovan. Article written by David Jones. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 27, 2019.

External links

This page was last edited on 22 April 2020, at 20:55
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