To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

1949 in baseball

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/3
    Views:
    4 703
    412 401
    410
  • Yogi Berra and the Baseball Season of 1949
  • 1952 World Series, Game 7: Yankees @ Dodgers
  • Danny Gardella Sues Baseball 1949

Transcription

you made %uh an amazing comment about why joe dimaggio and others didn't like yogi berra and that was symptomatic perhaps of america at the time why don't you elaborate yeah berra was ugly berra was an ugly slightly uneducated italian from what they call the dago hill section of saint louis that is actually what the hill is called it's called dago hill and dimaggio all during his yankee career was called the big dago and then when they got crucetti he was called the little dago and then when %uh berra came he was the no neck dago but berra was an ugly ballplayer he had no neck in fact when he was scouted by the saint louis cardinals his home team they gave garagiola joe garagiola a five hundred dollar bonus and berra sad how come i don't get the five hundred dollar bonus all my records are better than garagiola's and the scout said to him you're ugly you don't look like a ball player and berra never forgot that but when he came up what they didn't realize is that the short armed no necked five-foot eight five-foot nine-inch ballplayer with tremendous contact capacity was gonna revolutionize the position he was a terrible catcher there are no publicity pictures of berra in forty eight and forty nine with a catcher's mitt on they were convinced they had to make him into an outfielder but when stengel came and weiss met with stengel they said the only way this team is going to go anywhere is if berra turns into a catcher so they brought bill dickey in and then my three pitchers put together something called the project and that project was we'll call the games and teach you how to call a game so they didn't berra didn't give a signal for perhaps the first sixty games of the nineteen forty nine season 0:02:01.160,0:02:05.460 0:02:05.460,0:02:07.530

Contents

Champions

Major League Baseball

Caribbean leagues

Caribbean World Series

Other champions

Winter Leagues

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

American League National League
AVG George Kell DET .343 Jackie Robinson BKN .342
HR Ted Williams BSR 43 Ralph Kiner PIT 54
RBI Ted Williams BSR &
Vern Stephens BSR
159 Ralph Kiner PIT 127
Wins Mel Parnell BSR 25 Warren Spahn BSB 21
ERA Mike Garcia CLE 2.36 Dave Koslo NYG 2.50
Ks Virgil Trucks DET 153 Warren Spahn BSB 151

Major league baseball final standings

American League final standings

American League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st New York Yankees 97   57 .630    --
2nd Boston Red Sox 96   58 .623   1.0
3rd Cleveland Indians 89   65 .578   8.0
4th Detroit Tigers 87   67 .565 10.0
5th Philadelphia Athletics 81   73 .526 16.0
6th Chicago White Sox 63   91 .409 34.0
7th St. Louis Browns 53 101 .344 44.0
8th Washington Senators 50 104 .325 47.0

National League final standings

National League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st Brooklyn Dodgers 97   57 .630    --
2nd St. Louis Cardinals 96   58 .623   1.0
3rd Philadelphia Phillies 81   73 .526 16.0
4th Boston Braves 75   79 .487 22.0
5th New York Giants 73   81 .474 24.0
6th Pittsburgh Pirates 71   83 .461 26.0
7th Cincinnati Reds 62   92 .403 35.0
8th Chicago Cubs 61   93 .396 36.0

Events

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Movies

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

  • January   1 – Hans Rasmussen, 53, pitcher who played for the Chicago Whales during the 1915 season.
  • January   4 – Joe Evers, 57, pinch-runner who appeared in just one game for the 1913 New York Giants.
  • January   5 – Ralph Edwards, 66, second baseman for the 1915 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • January   9 – Harry McIntire, 69, pitcher who played from 1905 through 13 for the Brooklyn Superbas, Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds, who posted a 13-9 record with a 3.07 ERA and 10 complete games in 1910, to help Chicago win the 1910 National League pennant.
  • January 21 – Russ Ennis, 51, catcher who played for the Washington Senators in the 1926 season.
  • January 23 – Walt Herrell, 69, pitcher for the 1911 Washington Senators.
  • January 26 − Hugh Bradley, 63, first baseman who played for the Boston Red Sox, Pittsburgh Rebels, Brooklyn Tip-Tops and Newark Pepper in a span of four seasons from 1910–1915, including the 1912 World Champion Red Sox.
  • January 28 – Frank Naleway, 46, shortstop who played with the Chicago White Sox in 1924.

February

  • February   4 – Pat Martin, 54, pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1920 season.
  • February   8 – John Carden, 27, pitcher for the 1946 New York Giants.
  • February 10 – Johnny Bates, 66, outfielder who played from 1906 to 1914 for the Boston Beaneaters, Boston Doves, Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs and Baltimore Terrapins, as well is a member of the select list of players who hit a home run in their first MLB at bat.
  • February 15 – Tommy Raub, 78, backup catcher who played for the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals in part of two seasons spanning 1903–1906.
  • February 18 – Marty O'Toole, 60, pitcher who played with the Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates and New York Giants in a span of five seasons from 1908 to 1914.
  • February 20 – Norm Baker, 85, who pitched for the Pittsburgh Alleghenys, Louisville Colonels and Baltimore Orioles of the National League in three seasons between 1883 and 1890.
  • February 24 – Ted Scheffler, 84, outfielder who played in 1888 with the Detroit Wolverines and for the Rochester Broncos in 1890.

March

  • March 11 – Eric McNair, 39, shortstop who played with the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, Chicago White Sox and Detroit Tigers during 14 seasons from 1929 to 1942, was a member of the 1930 World Series Champion Athletics, led the American League in doubles with 47 in 1932, and also was a member of a 1934 All-American team that toured China, Japan and the Philippines, playing against teams in those countries.[1]
  • March 15 – Bill Cissell, 45, middle infielder who played for the Chicago White Sox, Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Athletics and New York Giants during 10 seasons spanning 1928–1938.
  • March 18 – Rudy Sommers, 61, pitcher who played for the Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Tip-Tops and Boston Red Sox over four seasons between 1912 and 1927.
  • March 19 – Truck Eagan, 71, part-time infielder for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Cleveland Blues in the 1901 season.
  • March 22 – Jake Livingstone, 69, Russian pitcher who played in 1901 with the New York Giants.
  • March 25 – Jim Riley, 62, outfielder who appeared in just one game with the Boston Doves in 1910.
  • March 26 – Mike Jacobs, 72, shortstop who played five games for the Chicago Orphans in 1902.
  • March 27 – Frank Gleich, 55, backup outfielder for the 1919–1920 New York Yankees
  • March 30 – Bill Bernhard, 78, one of the first pitchers to jump from the National League to the American League, who posted a combined record of 116–82 with a 3.04 earned run average in 231 games for the Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Athletics and the Cleveland Bronchos/Naps from 1899 to 1907, including 23 wins and a 2.13 ERA for Cleveland in the 1904 season.

April

  • April   4 – George Suggs, 66, pitcher whose career spanned from 1908 through 1915, compiling a 99–91 record with a 3.11 ERA in 245 games with the Detroit Tigers, Cincinnati Reds and Baltimore Terrapins, including 20 wins in 1910 and 24 in 1914.
  • April   6 – Gene Madden,59, who appeared as a pinch-hitter in one game for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1916.
  • April 11 – Joe Buskey, 46, shortstop for the 1926 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • April 20 – John Murphy, 69, backup infielder who played from 1902 to 1903 for the St. Louis Cardinals and Detroit Tigers.
  • April 21 – Harry Morelock, 79, shortstop for the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1891 and 1892 seasons.
  • April 28 – Clay Touchstone, 46, pitcher who played for the Boston Braves and Chicago White Sox over parts of three seasons between 1928 and 1945.

May

  • May   6 – Charlie Hallstrom, 85, one of four big leaguers to have been born in Sweden. who pitched in just one game for the Providence Grays during the 1885 National League season.
  • May   6 – Speed Kelly, 64, third baseman who played for the Washington Senators in 1909.
  • May   7 – James Durham, 67, pitcher for the Chicago White Sox in 1902.
  • May   8 – Sam Breadon, 72, owner of the St. Louis Cardinals from 1920 to 1947.
  • May 14 – Mike Kahoe, 75, one of the first catchers to wear shin guards, who played for the Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Orphans, St. Louis Browns, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs and Washington Senators in 10 seasons from 1895 to 1909.
  • May 17 – Bill Swarback, 81, for the 1887 New York Giants.
  • May 24 – Joe Callahan, 32, pitcher who played for the Boston Bees in the 1939 to 1940 seasons.
  • May 27 – Jim Canavan, 82, who played some outfield and infield utility positions with the Cincinnati Kelly's Killers, Milwaukee Brewers, Chicago Colts, Cincinnati Reds and Brooklyn Bridegrooms in a span of five seasons from 1891–1897.
  • May 29 – Doc Scanlan, 68, who pitched with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Brooklyn Superbas/Dodgers during seven seasons between 1903 and 1911.

June

  • June   7 – Hi Bell, 51, pitcher who played for the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Giants in a span of eight seasons from 1924–1934, as well as a member of the Cardinals teams that won the World Series in 1926 and 1933 and the National League pennant in 1930.
  • June 12 – Oliver Marcell, 53, African American third baseman for a number of teams around the Negro Leagues from 1918 through 1931, also a top-class hitter whose defensive skills took center stage by comparison.[2]
  • June 14 – Charley Moran, 71, who gained renown as both a catcher and umpire in Major League Baseball and as a collegiate and professional American football coach, while playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, umpiring in the National League from 1918 to 1939, working in four World Series, and coaching football at several colleges.
  • June 15 – Nig Clarke, 66, Canadian catcher who played with the Detroit Tigers, Cleveland Naps, St. Louis Browns, Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates over part of nine seasons between 1905 and 1920.
  • June 15 – Jim Buchanan, pitcher for the 1905 St. Louis Browns of the American League.
  • June 16 – Jim Cook, 69, outfielder who played with the Chicago Cubs in the 1903 season.
  • June 16 – Jerry Kane, 87, backup catcher for the 1890 St. Louis Browns of the National League.
  • June 23 – John Godar, 84, outfielder for the 1892 Baltimore Orioles of the National League.
  • June 25 – Buck Freeman, 77, outfielder for the Washington Statesmen/Senators, Boston Beaneaters and Boston Americans in 10 seasons between 1891 and 1907, who led both the National League and American League in home runs, twice topped the American League in RBI, batted a .300 average four times, and was a member of the 1903 World Champion Boston Americans.[3]

July

  • July   6 – Ike Caveney, 54, shortstop who played with the Cincinnati Reds from 1922 to 1925, and later became a player-manager for the PCL San Francisco Seals from 1932–1934.
  • July 10 – Red Downey, 60, outfielder for the 1909 Brooklyn Superbas of the National League.
  • July 17 – Jack Slattery, 71, backup catcher who played for the Boston Americans, Cleveland Naps, Chicago White Sox, St. Louis Cardinals and Washington Senators in parts of four seasons from 1901–1909, and later managed the Boston Braves in 1928.
  • July 23 – John Anderson, 75, outfielder and first baseman and the first of only three big leaguers to have been born in Norway, who played for six teams in a 14 season-career between 1894 and 1908, slashing .290/.329/.405 through 1,636 games, while leading the National League with 22 triples and a .494 slugging average in 1898 and the American League with 39 stolen bases in 1906.

August

  • August 22 – Chief Zimmer, 88, catcher for 19 seasons, 13 with the Cleveland Spiders, batted .300 four times.
  • August 25 – Mule Watson, 52, who pitched from 1918 through 1924 for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates and New York Giants, as well as the last pitcher in Major League Baseball history to start both games of a doubleheader twice in the same season.[4]

September

  • September   1 – Larry McClure, 64, outfielder for the 1910 New York Highlanders.
  • September   9 – Len Madden, 59, pitcher for the 1912 Chicago Cubs.
  • September   9 – Hal Neubauer, 47, pitcher who played for the 1925 Boston Red Sox.
  • September 12 – Sherry Smith, 58, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Brooklyn Robins and Cleveland Indians in a span of 14 season from 1911–1927, who is best known as the hard-luck loser in a pitching duel against Babe Ruth of the Boston Red Sox in the longest World Series game ever played — 14 innings in 1916 — when gave up an-out, RBI-single to Del Gainer that allowed Mike McNally to score the winning run in the eventual 2-1 loss.[5]
  • September 13 – Tim Jordan, 70, first baseman for the Washington Senators, New York Highlanders and Brooklyn Superbas over parts of ten seasons from 1901–1910, who led the National League in home runs in 1906 and 1908.
  • September 14 – Billy Martin, 75, shortstop for the Boston Braves in the 1914 season.
  • September 15 – Heinie Beckendorf, 65, catcher who played with the Detroit Tigers from 1909 to 1910 and for the Washington Senators in 1910.
  • September 15 – Tiny Bonham, 36, All-Star pitcher who played for the New York Yankees and Pittsburgh Pirates during 10 seasons between 1940 and 1949, as well as a member of the Yankees teams that won World Series titles in 1941 and 1943.
  • September 18 – Roger Denzer, 77, pitcher who played with the Chicago Colts in 1897 and for the New York Giants in 1901.
  • September 18 – Charlie Malay,70, second baseman for the 1905 Brooklyn Superbas.
  • September 21 – Buck Danner, 58, shortstop who played for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1915 season.
  • September 22 – Matty Fitzgerald, 69, catcher who played from 1906 to 1907 for the New York Giants.

October

  • October   1 – Eddie Kolb, 69, pitched one game in the Majors, the last game for the Cleveland Spiders; later went on to successful ventures in semi-pro baseball and the oil business in Canada.
  • October   2 – Wildfire Schulte, 67, right fielder for the Cubs, won NL's 1911 MVP award, stole home 22 times.
  • October   3 – John Donahue, 55, right fielder for the 1923 Boston Red Sox.
  • October 19 – Bill Steele, 63, pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals 1910–1914.
  • October 20 – Dick Rudolph, 62, spitball pitcher won 121 games for Boston Braves, also first and last games of 1914 World Series.

November

December

  • December   1 – Hanson Horsey, 60, pitcher who played for the Cincinnati Reds in the 1912 season.
  • December   3 – Pete LePine, 73, Canadian outfielder and first baseman who appeared in 30 games for the Detroit Tigers in 1902.
  • December 13 – Orth Collins, 69, outfielder and pitcher who played with the New York Highlanders in the 1904 season and for the Washington Senators in 1909.
  • December 15 – Frank Hershey, 72, pitcher who appeared in just one game for the Boston Beaneaters in the 1905 season.
  • December 16 – Jack Himes, 71, outfielder who played for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1905 and 1906 seasons.
  • December 19 – Robert Gibson, 80, pitcher for the Chicago Colts and Pittsburgh Alleghenys during the 1890 National League season, who later became a federal judge.
  • December 21 – Teddy Kearns, 49, backup infielder who played with the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1920 season and for the Chicago Cubs from 1924 to 1925.
  • December 30 – Doc Watson, 64, pitcher who played with the Chicago Cubs in 1913, before joining the Chicago Chi-Feds and St. Louis Terriers clubs of the Federal League from 1914 to 1915.

Sources

  1. ^ Eric McNair regarded as key player in 1943 fortunes of Indians. The Indianapolis News. Article published on April 24, 1943. Retrieved on February 2, 2018.
  2. ^ The talent and the temper of Oliver Marcelle. Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum website. Retrieved on February 3, 2018.
  3. ^ Buck Freeman biography. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on February 3, 2018,
  4. ^ A thorough account of pitchers who have started both games of a doubleheader in the major leagues. The J.G. Preston Experience. Retrieved on February 5, 2018.
  5. ^ 1916 World Series Game 2 – Brooklyn Robins at Boston Red Sox. Box score and history. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on February 5, 2018.
This page was last edited on 3 December 2018, at 20:45
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.